Courts & Litigation

House of Representatives v. Burwell: Government's Reply

The House of Representatives lacks standing to sue the Obama administration over the health care law, the U.S. Department of Justice said on Tuesday night in a new court filing in Washington federal district court.

Vessels equipped with water cannons try to fight the devastating Deepwater Horizon fire.

BP Says Subsidiary Will Go Broke if Spill Fine Tops $2.3B

By Amanda Bronstad |

BP PLC for the first time has identified in court papers the amount its subsidiary should pay in civil fines for its role in the Deepwater Horizon spill, claiming that anything more than $2.3 billion could result in insolvency.

Wilmer's D.C. offices at 1875 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.

Wilmer Partners Beat a Path to Supreme Court Lectern

By Tony Mauro |

When former solicitor general Seth Waxman finished his argument before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, he did not leave the chamber. Instead, the partner at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr moved to another chair near the lectern so he could watch firm partner Thomas Saunders argue the next case.

Precedent Snares Justices in Spider-Man Toy Royalty Dispute

By Tony Mauro |

During an intense U.S. Supreme Court debate on Tuesday over the patent for a toy related to Spider-Man, the name of the masked superhero was never uttered.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

High Court Shuts Door on Suits Over Medicaid Rates

By Marcia Coyle |

Health care providers cannot sue states over Medicaid reimbursement rates that they contend are too low to ensure delivery of services under the federal-state program for poor and low-income individuals, a divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Amicus Brief: Former DEA Administrators Fired Up Over Colorado Marijuana

All nine former administrators of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration—Republicans and Democrats&mdash:have filed an extraordinary brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a challenge by Nebraska and Oklahoma against Colorado's legalization of marijuana.

Douglas Hallward-Driemeier of Ropes & Gray and Mary Bonauto of Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders will argue for gay marriage on April 28 in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Supreme Court Veteran, First-Time Advocate to Argue for Gay Marriage

By Marcia Coyle |

Veteran U.S. Supreme Court practitioners and lawyers making their debuts before the justices will make the landmark arguments over same-sex marriage before the high court on April 28.

TopVerdicts2014bug

Top Verdicts of 2014: Tobacco Is Back

Six of the nation's largest verdicts last year came from Florida juries to smokers and their families. But one topped them all.

Justices: GPS Monitoring of Sex Offenders Raises Fourth Amendment Concerns

By Tony Mauro |

Requiring a convicted North Carolina sex offender to wear a GPS device on his ankle for the rest of his life amounts to a search that raises Fourth Amendment concerns, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court John Roberts Jr.

Court Struggles With Procedure for Showing Mental Disability

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struggled with whether state courts violate the Constitution when they decide a death row inmate is intellectually disabled based solely on evidence produced during the sentencing phase of the inmate's trial.

Chart: Top 100 Verdicts of 2014

The National Law Journal’s VerdictSearch affiliate scoured the nation’s court records in search of 2014’s biggest verdicts.

Eleventh Circuit: Carlos Zelaya v. United States

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit on Monday said the United States is shielded from liability for the alleged negligence of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over its handling of R. Allen Stanford's multibillion-dollar Ponzi scheme.

Wisconsin Agrees to Largest Same-Sex Marriage Payout: $1M

By Zoe Tillman |

Wisconsin will pay more than $1 million in legal fees—the largest single payout by a state so far in federal court—after unsuccessfully defending the state’s same-sex marriage ban.

Sally Yates, during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to be Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice. March 24, 2015.

INADMISSIBLE: Sally Yates is Mum on Immigration Policy

The constitutionality of the Obama administration's executive action on immigration is "an issue on which reasonable people can disagree," Sally Quillian Yates, the White House nominee for deputy attorney general, told the Senate Judiciary Committee on March 24. Plus more in this week's column.

<b>STACKED:</b> A Judicial Conference committee on April 1 will take up a proposal to pare down appellate briefs. Most attorney-commenters oppose the plan. Some federal appeals judges support it.

A 12,500-Word Limit is Too Brief For Some Appellate Lawyers

By Zoe Tillman |

Lawyers often push for as much time as they can get to argue an appeal. When the red light flashes, signaling time is up, some lawyers keep going — until a judge tells them to stop. So it's probably no surprise that a proposal to cut the number of words that lawyers get to make their case in court briefs drew strong reactions.

Verdicts & Settlements

A summary of this week's notable decisions.

<b>JOE RE:</b> The Knobbe Martens partner won a $466.8 million verdict for Masimo Corp. over infringement of patents related to blood-oxygen monitoring technology

Was 2014 The Twilight of the Patent Trolls?

By Sheri Qualters |

The litigation ground shifted as contests between business competitors produced large verdicts.

Yellow Cab that crashed in downtown Chicago in 2005, in which Marc Jacobs, a former real estate partner at Barrack Ferranzzano Kirschbaum & Nabelberg, was a passenger, when he sustained brain injuries.

Cab Ride Cuts Short A Career

By Amanda Bronstad |

Marc Jacobs, a real estate partner at Barack Ferrazzano Kirschbaum & Nagelberg, suffered massive brain injuries when the taxicab he was taking home crashed into a concrete wall. A jury awarded $25.9 million to Jacobs and his wife.

<b>WILLIE GARY:</b> “The Giant Killer” bested R.J. Reynolds in Florida court.

Tobacco Verdicts Dominated 2014

By Amanda Bronstad |

Tobacco is back. Six of the nation's largest verdicts last year came from Florida juries to smokers and their families in cases against Big Tobacco. But one topped them all.

Methodology

Germanwings Crash Puts Spotlight on Pilot Screening

By Amanda Bronstad |

The crash of a Germanwings Flight 9525 at the hands of a pilot who may have deliberately downed the plane raises questions about the effectiveness of pilot screening for mental illness and the liability that airlines may face.

Demonstrators against same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation. March 26, 2013.

States Tell Justices to Leave Marriage Decision to Them

By Marcia Coyle |

The four states defending their bans on same-sex marriage in the U.S. Supreme Court told the justices on Friday to leave the decision where the Constitution places it—in the hands of the states.

Lawyers for Foley & Lardner partner Howard Shipley on Thursday responded to the U.S. Supreme Court’s threat to sanction him for a petition he filed in a patent case.

A Tip From The Justices on Writing: Keep it Simple

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court rarely offers practice pointers to the advocates who appear before it. But it did just that on March 23, when it admonished members of the Supreme Court bar to use "plain terms" when they write briefs.

Council Challenges Proposed LSAT Disability Accommodations

An expert panel’s proposals for liberalizing disability accommodations for the Law School Admission Test would undermine the exam’s integrity, the organization that administers the test has argued in court papers.

In Upset, An Overtime Win for Car Repair 'Advisers'

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal appeals court has found that "service advisers"—those people at the car dealership who give repair estimates—are entitled to overtime pay under federal labor law.

Rescue workers work on debris of the Germanwings jet at the crash site near Seyne-les-Alpes, France, Thursday, March 26, 2015.

Crash Leaves Lufthansa Wide Open to U.S. Litigation

By Sheri Qualters |

Lufthansa could face wrongful death claims in the United States by the families of the three Americans reported killed in the Germanwings jetliner crash in the French Alps on Tuesday, according to aviation attorneys tracking developments.

USA v. Blankenship: Media Companies Oppose Seal Request

The Wall Street Journal, the Associated Press, Charleston Gazette and NPR on Thursday filed their opposition to former Massey Energy Company CEO Donald Blankenship's motion to seal information in the government's criminal case against him in West Virginia federal district court.

United States v. FedEx

Lawyers for FedEx on Wednesday asked a California federal district judge to dismiss the government's drug conspiracy indictment.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer

Court Sides With Challenge to Alabama's 'Racial Gerrymander'

By Marcia Coyle |

A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, citing a federal district court's multiple legal errors, directed that court to reconsider its decision upholding Alabama's redistricting plan after it was challenged as an unconstitutional "racial gerrymander."

Yellow Cab that crashed in downtown Chicago in 2005, in which Marc Jacobs, a former real estate partner at Barrack Ferranzzano Kirschbaum & Nabelberg, was a passenger, when he sustained brain injuries.

Lawyer's Tragic Crash Leads to $26 Million Verdict

By Amanda Bronstad |

Marc Jacobs had just finished a late dinner in downtown Chicago when he hailed a cab to his suburban Hinsdale, Illinois, home. Jacobs, a real estate partner at Barack Ferrazzano Kirschbaum & Nagelberg, had been meeting with an executive from Wells Fargo Bank, one of his clients. But on the way home to his wife and two sons, ages 12 and 8, the cab suddenly veered off Interstate 294, slamming into a concrete wall at 70 miles per hour, according to a lawsuit Jacobs filed. Jacobs, 44, suffered massive brain injuries.

Justices Debate Costs and Benefits of EPA Pollution Rules

By Tony Mauro |

The Obama administration's ambitious effort to reduce power plant pollution underwent tough scrutiny Wednesday as the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether the Environment Protection Agency should have given more consideration to the costs involved in writing its regulations.

Peggy Young, a Virginia woman who lost her UPS job because she became pregnant, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014.

High Court Raises Burden for Employers on Pregnancy Bias

By Marcia Coyle |

Employers are not required to give pregnant workers the same accommodations that they offer workers with other disabilities, but need to establish a legitimate, nondiscriminatory reason for any difference to avoid liability for pregnancy discrimination, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

In this Friday, Nov. 29, 2008, file photo, carts full of merchandise ordered online are rolled to the main packing area for shipping at the Overstock.com warehouse, in Salt Lake City.

'Trolls Never Actually Go Away,' Overstock.com GC Tells Congress

By Jenna Greene |

"We would rather pay real dollars in high defense costs than give a dime to abusive patent trolls," Overstock general counsel Mark Griffin told members of a House subcommittee. "In the short run, it is cheaper and less risky to pay the troll to go away. But the trolls never actually go away."

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan

Supreme Court Restricts Securities Suits that Challenge Company 'Opinions'

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday limited, but did not erase, the liability that companies face when they offer opinions or predictions in securities filings that turn out to be wrong.

Justices Confront Rubble of Housing Market Collapse

By Marcia Coyle |

Fallout from the 2008 collapse of the nation's housing bubble played out in the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday as the justices struggled over whether homeowners could wipe out a completely underwater mortgage in bankruptcy.

Charlie Baker of Tampa, FL.

Amicus Brief Reveals History of Government Anti-Gay Bias

By Tony Mauro |

As a young clerk in the U.S. Bureau of Standards in 1971, Charles Baker received a letter from the Civil Service Commission accusing him of "immoral, infamous, scandalous and notoriously disgraceful conduct," namely homosexual acts. Five months later he was fired.

Daily Document: United States Telecom Association v. FCC

By Jenna Greene |

United States Telecom Association on Monday asked a federal appeals court in Washington to review the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules.

Sally Yates, during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to be Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice.  March 24, 2015.

Sally Yates Mum on Obama Immigration Policy

By Mike Sacks |

The constitutionality of the Obama administration's executive action on immigration is "an issue on which reasonable people can disagree," Sally Quillian Yates, the White House nominee for deputy attorney general, told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday.

Judge Hears Copyright Fight Over 'Happy Birthday To You'

By Amanda Bronstad |

In a court battle involving perhaps the only song more popular than "Blurred Lines," a federal judge is set to decide whether a Los Angeles-based music publisher has unlawfully been collecting licensing fees for the copyright to "Happy Birthday to You."

North Carolina Asks Supreme Court to Rule on Fetal Ultrasound Law

By Marcia Coyle |

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a federal appellate ruling striking down the state's law requiring women who seek an abortion to view a narrated ultrasound image prior to the procedure.

Proposed Sons of Confederate Veterans license plate. Photo: Texas Department of Motor Vehicles.

Justices Struggle Over Confederate Flag License Plates

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court seemed eager on Monday to find a way to let Texas keep the Confederate flag off its specialty license plates, as the justices heard lively oral arguments in a knotty First Amendment dispute.

Teresa Sheehan in 2013.

High Court Debates How Police Treat Mentally Ill Suspects

By Marcia Coyle |

In a case closely watched by law enforcement and mental health advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday searched for a test to guide police when the law requires them to take special steps in arresting an armed and violent mentally ill person.

Bumper Crop of Bankruptcy Cases at High Court

By Tony Mauro |

A third of the cases set for argument at the U.S. Supreme Court in the next two weeks involve bankruptcy law, the latest sign of a continuing docket trend that rarely makes headlines.

U.S. Supreme Court (March 2015)

Justices Won't Hear Wisconsin Voter ID Law Challenge

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge to Wisconsin's voter ID law, permitting the law to remain in place. The unsuccessful challengers are asking a federal appeals court to delay the law until after a state general election next month.

Verdicts & Settlements

A summary of this week's notable decisions.

<b>AS SEEN ON TV:</b> Euro-Pro says its Shark Rotator beats Dyson’s product.

Testy Litigants in Vacuum Dustup

By Amanda Bronstad |

Two leading manufacturers of vacuum cleaners named Animal and Shark are battling it out in court over whose product sucks more.

<b>OHIO:</b> Couples, seen here in August, await the outcome of the gay-marriage ruling.

Marriage-Rights Advocates at Odds Over Who Will Argue Cases

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

As with other potentially landmark challenges in the U.S. Supreme Court, lawyer egos, client wishes and historic high stakes in the same-sex marriage cases have become a classic recipe for a difficult, sometimes tense discussion about who will argue before the justices.

<b>OHIO:</b> Couples, seen here in August, await the outcome of the gay-marriage ruling.

Marriage-Rights Advocates at Odds Over Who Will Argue Cases

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

As with other potentially landmark challenges in the U.S. Supreme Court, lawyer egos, client wishes and historic high stakes in the same-sex marriage cases have become a classic recipe for a difficult, sometimes tense discussion about who will argue before the justices.

Civil Actions

Cases recently filed in the Washington-area district courts.

Company 'Wellness' Programs Get Check Up From EEOC

By Jenna Greene |

Under fire for a series of suits that challenge company wellness programs, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Friday voted to move forward with regulations that would clarify how such programs can comply with both the Affordable Care Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act.

Brief of the Day: Justice Dept. Defends ATF Stash-House Sting

The U.S. Department of Justice this week asked a federal appeals court to revive charges rooted in a federal sting over a fictitious drug stash house. A California district court dismissed the indictment for outrageous government conduct.

You Don’t Have to Take Your Mini to a Dealer for Service, FTC Says

By Jenna Greene |

The Federal Trade Commission put the brakes on a bid by BMW of North America to force Mini owners to take their cars to the dealer for work or lose warranty coverage.

Demonstrators in support of same-sex marriage, outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Religion and Marriage: The Elephant in the Courtroom

By Marcia Coyle |

None of the same sex marriage cases the U.S. Supreme Court will decide this term squarely raises religious liberty as an issue. But many groups involved in the litigation see that as the elephant behind the courtroom’s red velvet curtain.

Daily Document: Boyd Green v. Scott Chitwood

Marine veteran Boyd Green is suing over his arrest for using the phrases "sorry damn asshole" and "damn bullshit" as he registered a complaint with a 911 operator about a police officer.

Proposed Sons of Confederate Veterans license plate. Photo: Texas Department of Motor Vehicles.

Brief of the Week: Defending Offensive Speech

By Jamie Schuman |

Amicus briefs filed with the U.S. Supreme Court usually don’t cite comedians like Chris Rock and Richard Pryor. But a coalition of self-proclaimed "boorish and crass" individuals did just that—and made barbs of its own—in a brief that reminds the justices that offensive speech is constitutional.

R. James George, Jr. of George Brothers Kincaid & Horton.

Docket Chat: Former Marshall Clerk to Argue for Pro-Confederate Group

By Tony Mauro |

The lawyer who will argue before the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of the Sons of Confederate Veterans on March 23 is R. James George Jr., a former law clerk to the late Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Daily Document: Cecil Clayton v. State of Missouri

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to stop the execution of Missouri prisoner Cecil Clayton, convicted for the November 1996 shooting death of a police officer. Clayton's lawyers said he is incompetent based on a brain injury he suffered decades ago.

Shark Rotator Professional Lift-Away advertisement.

Litigants Get Testy in Vacuum-Cleaner Dustup

By Amanda Bronstad |

Two leading manufacturers of vacuum cleaners named Animal and Shark are battling it out in court over whose product sucks more.

Demonstrations for and against same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court.

Who Will Argue Historic Gay Marriage Cases?

By Marcia Coyle |

Who will get to argue the historic same-sex marriages cases in the U.S. Supreme Court next month will remain a mystery for a little longer. The lawyers representing the same-sex couples in the four cases slotted for arguments on April 28 asked the justices on Tuesday to divide the arguments on their side in the two questions posed by the high court.

A group of immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are stopped in Granjeno, Texas, on June 25, 2014. On Tuesday, July 8, 2014, President Barack Obama asked Congress for $3.7 billion to cope with a tide of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border.

Jesuit Law Schools Address Immigration Flood

By Karen Sloan |

Thirteen law schools housed at Jesuit universities will collaborate to help unaccompanied children and immigrant families from Central America seek refuge in the United States.

Securities Class Actions Targeting Life-Sciences Sector

By Sheri Qualters |

Securities class actions against life-sciences companies more than doubled last year, to 39 cases compared with 19 during 2013, according to a survey by Dechert.

Herbal Supplements Class Actions Piling Up

By Amanda Bronstad |

The plaintiffs bar has filed more than 50 class actions in the past month that accuse retailers like Target Corp. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. of widespread fraud through the sale of herbal supplements.

<b>CRIME SCENE:</b> Judge Terrence Berg was shot outside his Detroit home on March 5. (AP Photo/The Flint Journal-MLive.com, Tanya Moutzalias)

Safeguarding Judges

By Zoe Tillman |

Attacks on federal judges are rare. When there is violence, it usually occurs away from the heavy security of courthouses. But the attention and money dedicated to judicial security has grown more robust over the past decade.

<b>INVALID:</b> CaptionCall was ordered to pay $44 million for infringing patents later invalidated.

Patent Panel Hits One Major Hitch

By Jenna Greene |

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board is supposed to be a new, efficient alternative that streamlines patent disputes — and it can be. But that depends on district court judges' willingness to place parallel litigation on hold while the board ­determines whether the patents at issue are valid.

<b>HOW MUCH?:</b> A hit song written for Jason DeRulo, above, generated only about $3,150 in royalties for three writers, said Matthew Pincus, their representative, who testified last week on Capitol Hill.

Who Pays The Piper? How Much?

By Mike Sacks |

For just over two hours last week, songwriters and those who profess their best interests had an audience at the Senate, but their messages were hardly harmonious.

<b>ANGELI RIOS:</b> She decried a “cumbersome” disability screening process.

Next Round in LSAT Disability Fight

By Karen Sloan |

If an aspiring law student passed an earlier standardized test with an accommodation for a disability, does that merit similar treatment for the Law School Admission Test? Or must he prove again that he needs extra time or a separate testing room?

Gawker Media LLC v. U.S. Department of State

Gawker Media LLC filed a Freedom of Information Act suit on Friday against the U.S. Department of State over access to email records.

Top Sysco Lawyer Can't See Confidential Docs, Court Rules

By Jenna Greene |

The chief legal officer for Sysco Corp. can't review sensitive documents from competitors related to his company's contested merger, a district court judge ruled Thursday. But it's nothing personal.

Bart Peterson, left, and Pete McNamara are married by Marion County Clerk Beth White in Indianapolis after a federal judge struck down a state ban on same-sex marriage. June 25, 2014.

Indiana Pays $650K in Legal Fees to Marriage-Law Challengers

By Zoe Tillman and Mike Scarcella |

Indiana has agreed to pay $650,000 in legal fees to the lawyers who successfully challenged the state's same-sex marriage ban. State officials negotiated an award of $325,000 to Kirkland & Ellis and $325,000 to Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund.

Circuit Sustains Default, Contempt Orders Totaling $235M

By Sheri Qualters |

A federal appeals court has upheld a $75 million default judgment and $160 million in sanctions for contempt against Biolitec A.G. and chief executive officer Wolfgang Neuberger for “severe” misconduct in a contract dispute.

Outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day the Court issued its decisions in key cases regarding the Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California's same-sex marriage ban Proposition 8.  June 26, 2013.

Law Students Tell Justices How Same-Sex Marriage Bans Harm Careers

By Marcia Coyle |

Ten LGBT student organizations, including six from law schools at Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Columbia, UCLA and New York University, tell the Supreme Court that same-sex marriage nonrecognition laws impose special harms on their members as they try to begin new careers in a highly mobile nation.

Q&A: Akin Gump Partner Secures Justice for Somalis

By Amanda Bronstad |

The U.S. Supreme Court on March 9 declined to review the appeal of Somalia’s former prime minister, Mohamed Ali Samantar. The decision ended an 11-year case brought by victims and their families over torture and killings that occurred in the 1980s. Steven Schulman, head of the pro bono practice and a partner in the Washington office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, teamed with the Center for Justice and Accountability on the case.

Daily Document: DOJ Emergency Motion to Stay Immigration Ruling

The U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday urged a federal appeals court to stay a Texas judge's preliminary injunction against the Obama administration's immigration policies.

Beryl Howell.

Despite 'Egregious' Errors, FDA Can Take Back Generic Nexium Approval

By Jenna Greene |

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration committed "egregious errors" when it tentatively approved two generic drug applications, but the agency has the power to fix its mistakes by revoking the approvals, a Washington federal judge ruled Wednesday.

Professors Issue Conflicting Views of Patent Reform

By Sheri Qualters |

Dozens of academics have signed letters to Congress outlining contrasting concerns about pending patent reform legislation.

Sedgwick Settles $210 Million Legal Malpractice Case

By Amanda Bronstad |

Sedgwick has reached a tentative settlement to resolve a lawsuit over its role in a $1 billion Ponzi scheme in California. A spokesman for the San Francisco law firm, which put off a March 3 trial to begin settlement discussions, confirmed that an agreement had been reached. Details of the settlement were not disclosed.

University of Iowa College of Law.

Justices OK Retrial for Law Prof's Political Bias Case

By Karen Sloan |

A part-time legal writing instructor at the University of Iowa College of Law who alleges she was passed over for a faculty position because of her conservative political views will get a second chance to prove her case.

DirecTV Duped Consumers Over Monthly Costs, FTC Says in Suit

By Jenna Greene |

Seeking refunds for millions of consumers, the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued DirecTV for false advertising, alleging that the satellite television provider misrepresented the true cost of its service.

LEGO Friends.

Lego Sues to Block Imports in Patent Fight Over Toy Dolls

By Jenna Greene |

The International Trade Commission on Wednesday gave a green light to toymaker Lego A/S to bring a patent and copyright infringement case against three competitors that are seeking to appeal more to girls. Lego says its rivals copied its "Friends" line.

Daily Document: Associated Press v. U.S. Department of State

The Associated Press on Wednesday sued the Department of State over access to Hillary Clinton's emails during her service as secretary of state.

Richard Cordray.

Consumer Agency Confronts Mandatory Arbitration Agreements

By Jenna Greene |

For years, businesses have argued that mandatory arbitration is good for consumers, that it’s faster and cheaper and the outcome is as good or better than going to court. A new study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau contradicts many of those claims.

Yet Another Trial for POM Wonderful in the Works

By Amanda Bronstad |

With a boost from last year’s U.S. Supreme Court victory, POM Wonderful LLC is maneuvering for a trial against The Coca-Cola Co. over the labeling of its competing juice.

Allyson Ho, co-chair of the U.S. Supreme Court and appellate litigation practice at Morgan Lewis and Bockius LLP in Dallas, after her first argument before the high court in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association on Nov. 10, 2014.

A Supreme Court Win for the Administrative State

By Tony Mauro |

In a significant victory for regulators over the wishes of the regulated, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Monday that federal agencies do not need to seek public comment when they change their interpretation of their own rules.

New Hires Join U.S. Supreme Court Community

By Tony Mauro |

Two personnel moves of interest to those who practice before or write about the U.S. Supreme Court: Mara Silver is the court’s new emergency applications clerk, and Kate Shaw will help ABC News cover the court and legal issues.

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, March 25, 2014, during arguments in <i>Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.</i>

Justices Revive Birth-Control Insurance Challenge

By Marcia Coyle |

The University of Notre Dame will get another chance to challenge the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive insurance requirement because of action by the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.

Vin Testa, of D.C., outside the U.S. Supreme Court during the week when three of the biggest decisions of the term are to be issued, including Proposition 8/DOMA, Voting Rights Act, and Affirmative Action.  June 24, 2013.

Attorney Marshals Business Support for Marriage Equality

By Marcia Coyle |

In just four weeks, Susan Baker Manning of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius persuaded 379 businesses to sign an amicus brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court supporting same-sex marriage.

Scene outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day the Court issued its decisions in key cases regarding the Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California's same-sex marriage ban Proposition 8.  June 26, 2013.

Brief Filed in Marriage Case Boasts Record Number of Signers

By Tony Mauro |

One of the dozens of amicus curiae briefs filed March 6 in the same-sex marriage cases before the U.S. Supreme Court was signed by 207,551 people, a record number, according to the Human Rights Campaign, which organized the effort.

<b>ARLENE'S:</b> Business refused to cater to a same-sex couple’s wedding ceremony.

Gay Rights Bloom in Thorny War of Roses

By Amanda Bronstad |

When the American Civil Liberties Union contacted Michael Scott in 2013 about bringing a pro bono case for a newly engaged gay couple, he knew national attention would follow.

A protester holds a flag as she joins other gay marriage supporters in Linn Park, at the Jefferson County courthouse, Monday, Feb. 9, 2015, in Birmingham, Ala.

A Rebellion in Alabama

By Zoe Tillman |

State judges across the ­country remained largely silent as ­federal courts knocked down dozens of same-sex marriage bans during the past two years. The Alabama Supreme Court is alone in setting up a rare showdown between the state and federal judiciary.

Health Reform, the Personal-Injury Lawyer's Friend

By Jesse Coleman and Christopher Conatser |

Theoretically, the Affordable Care Act could help to hold down judgments for medical expenses.

Orrin Hatch

Arguments Extend to Capitol Hill

By Mike Sacks |

Oral arguments on a key challenge to the President Barack Obama's health care law had barely ended on March 4 before congressional Democrats rallied to praise U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli's defense of the law and Republicans vowed to replace the program should the U.S. Supreme Court find in favor of the challengers.

<b>THE SCENE:</b> Demonstrators offered their own arguments outside the Supreme Court. Later, health care stocks soared based on a perception the court would sustain the Affordable Care Act.

All Eyes on Roberts, Kennedy As Court Weighs Health Reform

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

The fate of the Affordable Care Act, and the ability of 8 million Americans to afford health insurance, may depend on two U.S. Supreme Court justices: John Roberts Jr. and Anthony Kennedy.

<b>ALLOWED:</b> The rules on private email accounts were tightened 21 months after Clinton left office.

Clinton Legal Liability Small In Email Mess

By Jenna Greene |

For Hillary Clinton, the public reaction to revelations that she exclusively used a personal email account while serving as secretary of state has been scathing. But any legal consequences are likely to prove negligible, legal experts said.

Are the 'Trolls' Coming for Life Sciences Patents?

By Edward Reines and Derek Walter |

Biotechnology companies need to avoid defenses that would fundamentally weaken their IP rights.

Craft Beer Maker's First Amendment Suit Over 'Raging Bitch' Label is Revived

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal appeals court on Thursday revived a craft beer maker's claims that Michigan liquor officials violated the First Amendment by blocking the sale of the company's "Raging Bitch" brew in the state.

Johnson & Johnson headquarters in New Brunswick, N.J.

$5.7M Verdict Against Pelvic Mesh Maker in Test Case

By Amanda Bronstad |

Johnson & Johnson lost a $5.7 million verdict on Thursday in the first test case over one of its newest pelvic mesh slings, which is among dozens of similar devices named in thousands of lawsuits across the country.

Daily Document: Appeals Court Strikes Gag Order in Case Against Coal Executive

A federal appeals court strikes down gag and sealing orders that restricted public access to information in the criminal case against former coal executive Donald Blankenship.

Daily Document: Federal Judge Shields Docs in WikiLeaks Investigation

FBI and DOJ Criminal Division records related to the ongoing WikiLeaks investigation were properly shielded from the public, a federal district judge ruled on Wednesday. The Electronic Privacy Information Center sued for the records.

Sidney Kanazawa.

Law Firms Fight Over Barbri Fees at the Ninth Circuit

By Amanda Bronstad |

Eight years after reaching a $49 million settlement in a closely watched antitrust case over the Barbri bar-review course, McGuireWoods was in court again on Wednesday in a spat over legal fees in the case.

Orrin Hatch

Health Reform Arguments Spill Over On to Capitol Hill

By Mike Sacks |

Oral arguments on a key challenge to the President Obama's health care law had barely ended on Wednesday before congressional Democrats rallied to praise U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli's defense of the law and Republicans vowed to replace the program should the Supreme Court find in favor of the challengers.