National News

Courts & Litigation

Supreme Court of Nevada.

Class Analysis Not Needed in Construction-Defect Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The Nevada Supreme Court has ruled it neither arbitrary nor capricious for a trial judge to decline to perform a class-action analysis in a lawsuit filed by a homeowners’ association against a general contactor over alleged defects.

Perdue Chicken-Conditions Class Action Withdrawn

By Lisa Hoffman |

Three years of class litigation challenging Perdue Farms Inc.’s assertion that it humanely raises chickens sold under one of its brands has ended with terse statements that the poultry company will no longer make that claim.

Dollar General Settles Credit-Check Claims for $4M

By Lisa Hoffman |

Failing to notify more than 100,000 job applicants that they would be subjected to background checks will cost discount retailer Dollar General Corp. $4 million to settle a proposed class action alleging the company violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Justices Will Rule on Police Scrutiny of Hotel Registries

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether a city ordinance authorizing police to search hotel and motel guest registries violates the Fourth Amendment.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginsburg Explains Saturday Surprise on Texas Voting Law

By Tony Mauro |

"Tremendous time pressure" is the reason behind the U.S. Supreme Court's recent spate of unexplained emergency orders, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said Sunday night.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginsburg Explains Saturday Surprise on Texas Voting Law

By Tony Mauro |

"Tremendous time pressure" is the reason behind the U.S. Supreme Court's recent spate of unexplained emergency orders, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said Sunday night.

Luke Bierman.

Elon School of Law Placing Practical Training ‘On Steroids’

By Amanda Bronstad |

Elon University School of Law is launching a J.D. program next year that offers full-time residencies led by faculty and allows students to graduate in less than three years at less cost.

Iced Tea Empire Valued at $2B in Partnership Dispute

By Julie Triedman |

The co-founders of the AriZona brand wage an epic legal battle about how much the company was worth.

Civil Actions

Cases recently filed in the Washington-area district courts.

<b>COOPERATE:</b> Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in July publicly credited GE Capital Retail Bank, now known as Synchrony Bank, for self-reporting violations.

Agency Sets High Expectations
For Cooperation

By Jenna Greene |

For lawyers defending companies under scrutiny by federal agencies, the real question is whether to self-report wrongdoing.

Jeffrey Fisher.

The Never-Ending Search of Digital Data

By JaneAnne Murray |

Once the government seizes tablets or smartphones, can it use the stored information forever?

<b>CHANGE DEMANDED:</b> Demonstrators gather outside the Department of Justice in Washington during a rally in support of Michael Brown, fatally shot by a police officer on Aug. 9 in Ferguson, Mo.

DOJ Is Facing Tough Task in Ferguson Probe

By Lisa M. Noller and Daniel Werly |

The Civil Rights Division's investigation into Michael Brown's death could help improve race relations.

Justices Thomas, Ginsburg, and Scalia joined in dissent Tuesday over the court's denial to review a sentencing dispute from the D.C. Circuit.

Why Did the Supreme Court Sidestep Sentencing Dispute?

By Tony Mauro |

When the U.S. Supreme Court ­refused to add a Washington drug case to its docket, it drew wide criticism for missing an opportunity to resolve a long­running dispute over judicial discretion in ­sentencing.

<b>IN TEXAS:</b> The cleanup commenced at the apartment where the first U.S. victim lived. A Dallas nurse has retained a lawyer.

Hospitals Sweat Potential Ebola Liability

By Amanda Bronstad and Andrew Ramonas |

As public health authorities moved to calm fears about the risk from Ebola, lawyers last week urged health care and other clients to take precautions against spreading the potentially fatal disease — and to mitigate attendant lawsuits.

<b>PASSIONS FLARE:</b> Among the disputes before courts are voting restrictions in various states.

Triage at Supreme Court

By Marcia Coyle |

Whether it's a coincidence or a product of an overheated political environment, the U.S. Supreme Court has been a magnet for a remarkable string of highly charged emergency requests during the past two weeks.

Verdicts & Settlements

A summary of this week's notable cases.

Judge Unseals Evidence in Garlock Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

After a protracted fight, a federal judge has ruled on Thursday that all of the evidence that led him to find misrepresentations by plaintiffs in an asbestos-related bankruptcy must be unsealed.

Drugmakers Lose Request for Protective Order in Records Spat

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Three drugmakers facing a lawsuit from the city of Chicago alleging they illegally marketed painkillers have lost their motion for a protective order against USA Today’s Illinois Freedom of Information Act requests.

N.Y. Modeling Agency Sued Over Pay

By Lisa Hoffman |

A company that bills itself as the premiere New York City source of clothing fit models has been slapped with a proposed class and collective action that alleges it unlawfully underpays its models and operates as an unlicensed employment agency.

Judge Rules Against Federal Venue For Class Action Against Energy Co.

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A class action against a Texas-based energy supplier will proceed in New York state court, not New York federal court, after a federal judge ruled the controversy is a local one over which federal jurisdiction doesn’t apply.

Appeals Panel Scolds Lower Court Over Discovery

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The U.S. Circuit Court for the Eleventh Circuit has criticized a lower court for requiring pre-discovery case management before it has ruled on the legal sufficiency of a plaintiff’s complaint.

Actos.

Drugmaker Recovers Emails After Spoliation Ruling

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. and five other related corporations report that they have recovered 61,000 emails and attachments after a Louisiana federal judge found that the Takeda was liable for spoliation of evidence in litigation over diabetes drug Actos.

Marathon Helper Alleges Labor Violations

By Lisa Hoffman |

The for-profit company that stages Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathons and Half Marathons in scores of U.S. cities each year unlawfully exploits thousands of “volunteers,” who think they are helping charities but actually are providing Competitor Group Inc. with free labor, a proposed class action alleges.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

Accused Marathon Bomber Loses Jury, Evidence Challenges

By Sheri Qualters |

A Boston federal judge on Friday denied accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s motion to dismiss his case and suppress evidence collected during the first two months after the bombings.

Insurer Loses Fight Over Therapy Coverage

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that a health insurer can’t exclude coverage for speech, occupational and physical therapies.

Michael Millikin.

Embattled Millikin Steps Down as GM’s General Counsel

By Amanda Bronstad |

General Motors Co. general counsel Michael Millikin, who has faced criticism and congressional inquiries over his handling of an ignition-switch defect, has announced plans to retire in early 2015.

Class Certified in Alleged Plot to Fix Air Freight Prices

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge has certified a class of tens of thousands of direct purchasers of air freight shipping services suing more than two dozen airlines in an alleged global price-fixing conspiracy.

Judge: Deal Didn’t Resolve Tribe’s Claims Against Glaxo

By Sheri Qualters |

A Boston federal judge has ruled that GlaxoSmithKline PLC’s $3 billion settlement of misbranding charges involving its diabetes drug Avandia and other pharmaceuticals did not resolve claims the Cherokee Nation filed in its Oklahoma tribal court.

Class Certified in Suit Over Jeep Liberty Windows

By Lisa Hoffman |

Because a lead plaintiff sold her vehicle before joining a putative class action against Chrysler Group LLC, a California federal judge sanctioned the woman for effectively destroying evidence and refused to certify a class of Maryland Jeep Liberty owners she had intended to represent.

Dispute Narrows Over ‘Misrepresentation’ Evidence in Asbestos Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The dispute over unsealing evidence of alleged misrepresentations by plaintiffs in an asbestos-related bankruptcy has apparently narrowed.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building in Washington, D.C.

Sixth Circuit Pares Back Corporate Liability Precedent

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit has pared back its precedent allowing the knowledge of a corporate officer to be imputed to a corporation in a securities fraud case even if that officer did not issue statements that were false or misleading to investors.

Arizona Agrees to Prison Health Care Reform

By Lisa Hoffman |

The Arizona Department of Corrections has agreed to make substantial changes in the health care it provides its 33,000 prisoners, signing off on a class-action settlement that will require the state to improve treatment of the mentally ill be-hind bars and those in solitary confinement, among other reforms.

General Motors Headquarters in Detroit, Michigan.

GM Hit With Recall Class Actions for 30 Million Consumers

By Amanda Bronstad |

Plaintiffs lawyers leading the fight against General Motors Co. over its ignition-switch recalls have filed two consolidated class actions on behalf of 30 million consumers across the country.

William Jay of Goodwin Procter

Key Patent Dispute Divides Supreme Court Justices

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday appeared torn on a contentious patent litigation issue: whether a trial court's factual findings about a patent claim deserve deference from the federal court that reviews such disputes on appeal.

Kannon Shanmugam of Williams & Connolly.

Supreme Court Rejects SG's Plan for Argument Time in Securities Case

By Tony Mauro |

Parties in U.S. Supreme Court litigation usually vie to have the federal government argue on their side. But in a case set for argument next month, the petitioner asked the court not to give the solicitor general’s office any of its half hour, and the court agreed.

Oyez Project Dives Deep Into the Fourth Amendment

By Marcia Coyle |

Justice Elena Kagan has called the Fourth Amendment "a growth industry" for the the U.S. Supreme Court. Now the Oyez Project, long a purveyor of high court information, has taken a "deep dive" into how the Roberts Court has managed that "industry."

Judge Approves Home-Attendant Wage-and-Hour Class

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

More than 1,000 New York attendants who work 24-hour shifts caring for elderly and disabled clients in their homes have been approved to proceed with their wage-and-hour class action.

SLAPP Ruling Upheld in Consumer-Protection Lawsuit

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A drug company cannot seek a court-issued declaration that it did not violate California’s Consumer Legal Remedies Act by advertising its dietary supplement Amberen as a natural remedy to relieve menopausal symptoms, the California Second District Court of Appeal has ruled.

Bid Fails to Force Asbestos Insurer Into Arbitration

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A London insurer will not be compelled into arbitration to determine what coverage it might owe in the bankruptcy of one of the major suppliers of asbestos-based products, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has ruled.

Party’tizers Three Bean Dippin’ Chips.

Snack Company in Class Action Attacks Plaintiffs Attorney

By Lisa Hoffman |

A putative class action accusing a snack food company of unlawfully labeling a product as “natural” has triggered a blast by the defense at the office of plaintiffs’ lawyer Howard Rubinstein, describing him as an ethically challenged attorney who was disbarred in Texas for stealing money.

Peruvian Crash Claims Survive Key Jurisdictional Ruling

By Amanda Bronstad |

A state appeals court, hearing tort claims arising from a fatal helicopter crash in Peru, has ruled for the first time that judges in Oregon can use the doctrine of forum non conveniens to decline jurisdiction in a case.

Philippines Broadcaster Prevails in Battle With Pirate

By Sheri Qualters |

Philippines broadcaster ABS-CBN Corp. has secured a $10 million federal consent judgment against a copyright and trademark infringer as an early victory in a broader court campaign against Internet pirates.

Dentist office.  Photo: Gunay Mutlu/iStockphoto.com.

High Court Drills Dental Examiners Board

By Marcia Coyle |

In a case that could affect thousands of state licensing boards, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday wrestled with whether a panel that drove nondentists offering teeth-whitening services out of the market violated federal antitrust laws.

Republican River

Justices Wade Into Kansas-Nebraska Water Dispute

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday tried, with limited success, to untangle a long-running dispute between Kansas and Nebraska over the use—and alleged overuse—of water from the Republican River.

Judge Rejects Avis Wage-and-Hour Deal as Too Vague

By Lisa Hoffman |

A proposed class settlement between Avis Budget Car Rental LLC and its shift operations managers would allocate nearly 40 percent of the $760,000 compensation fund to plaintiffs’ attorneys, but the amount class members would receive was unclear, a Florida judge said in refusing to approve the deal.

Judge Boots Privacy Class Action Against Cartoon Network

By Lisa Hoffman |

That’s all, folks: A Georgia federal judge has booted a proposed class action against The Cartoon Network Inc. that alleged privacy violations, ruling the personal information disclosed was too general to identify individuals.

Judge Blocks Discovery in Tainted-Steroid Litigation

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A judge has stayed litigation against a pharmacy that produced contaminated steroid drugs that caused a multistate breakout of meningitis.

AstraZeneca Prevails on Nexium Claims, Wins Costs

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Consolidated federal litigation over Nexium is dead after a California federal judge entered judgment in favor of AstraZeneca Pharmacueticals L.P. and McKesson Corp.

Gender Bias Action Against Merck Moves Ahead

By Laura Castro |

A New Jersey federal judge has denied a motion by Merck & Co. Inc. to dismiss a $250 million gender bias class action by female employees of the pharmaceutical giant who claim they were frozen out of hiring and advancement opportunities.

Philadelphia City Hall.

Suit Challenges Philadelphia’s Forfeiture Procedures

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The city of Philadelphia’s asset forfeiture procedures in criminal cases are being challenged as unconstitutional in a proposed class action.

Two Cases Filed Against Nursing Home Owners

By Amanda Bronstad |

California’s Garcia, Artigliere & Medby, which specializes in elder abuse litigation, filed two class actions last week against the owners of skilled nursing facilities.

Hurricane Sandy relief efforts, NJ.

After Hearing 'Only Crickets,' Court Tosses Sandy Cases

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A New Jersey federal judge has dismissed three Hurricane Sandy cases as a sanction for the plaintiffs for failing to prosecute their claims.

Boston Scientific Headed for Trial on Mesh Liability

By Amanda Bronstad |

On the heels of losing a $73.4 million verdict in Texas state court, Boston Scientific Corp. is headed to trial next month in two federal courts over its pelvic mesh devices.

Parties Blocked from Vermont Food Labeling Case

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A federal judge has rejected a bid by Vermont Public Interest Research Group and the Center for Food Safety to intervene in a lawsuit brought by several food industry associations to stop enforcement of a state law that will require labels to identify ingredients that have been genetically engineered.

Embattled Investigations Firm Faces Class Action

By Lisa Hoffman |

Embattled government contractor U.S. Investigations Services, LLC, already under fire for its background investigations of alleged secrets-leaker Edward Snowden and Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis, is now facing a proposed class action asserting it violated federal law when it laid off 1,200 workers in Pennsylvania.

Plaintiffs in Dialysis Suits Argue for Massachusetts Law

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A group of 127 dialysis plaintiffs from Mississippi alleging injury from products made by Fresenius Medical Care North America argue that Mississippi law should not apply to their cases because they filed their lawsuits in Massachusetts.

Samuel Mullet stands in front of his Bergholz, Ohio, home, on October 10, 2011.

Feds Ask Full Sixth Circuit to Review Amish Beard-Cutting Case

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Department of Justice has asked the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit to review a divided panel decision reversing the convictions of 16 members of the Ohio Amish community who engaged in a series of hair-shearing and beard-cutting assaults against followers of the faith three years ago.

<b>ABORTION:</b>  The Supreme Court was asked to intervene in a dispute over restrictions on abortion clinics in Texas.

Term Off to a Rollicking Start

By Tony Mauro and Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court's opening week was like no other, a roller coaster of buried big news, mishaps and oral arguments that touched on the length of beards and the meaning of work.

A nurse delivers a whooping cough vaccination to a student.

Vaccine Cases Fill This Court's Docket

By Jenna Greene |

As the antivaccination movement grows—and with it, outbreaks of diseases such as whooping cough, mumps and measles—the eight special masters at the so-called vaccine court within the U.S. Court of Federal Claims are under increasing pressure.

Civil Actions

The following cases were recently filed in the local district courts. This information is provided by the district courts’ official online bulletin boards.

DC Circuit

D.C. Circuit Readies For NSA Case

By Zoe Tillman |

When the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit convenes Nov. 4 to hear a challenge to government surveillance, lawyers will make their case to one judge — Senior Judge David Sentelle — who has grappled in recent years with the intersection of individual privacy rights and technology.

<b>DANGER:</b> Graffiti marks a neighborhood controlled by the Mara-18 gang in Ilopango, El Salvador. One of the pro bono program’s clients fled north after the gang menaced her and her 7-year-old son.

Adult Asylum-Seekers Need Lawyers, Too

By Katelyn Polantz |

Since last summer, four times as many families have crossed the border than during the previous fiscal year. Akin Gump and other large firms have stepped in to help.

Huntsville Unit in Texas.

Panel Declines to Combine Suits Targeting Texas Prisons

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal panel has refused to coordinate lawsuits filed on behalf of inmates in Texas state prisons who died or suffered heat strokes from soaring temperatures during the summers of 2011 and 2012.

Minn. Judge Blocks Deal Between Target, Pharmacies

By Lisa Hoffman |

A proposed $183,000 class action settlement between Target Corp. and hundreds of pharmacies over alleged robo-texts has been blocked by a Minnesota federal judge who said the deal could result in much of the award reverting to the company.

Exotic Dancers Reach Deal in Suit Over Wages

By Lisa Hoffman |

Exotic dancers at two New York City “gentlemen’s clubs” will get a cut of a proposed $4.3 million settlement of their class action claims that they were unlawfully underpaid and forced to share their tips with DJs and others.

Reflective glare that obscures driver's vision as a result of melting dashboard in Mazda vehicles.

Mazda Sued Over Allegedly Defective Dashboards

By Lisa Hoffman |

Dashboards in some models of Mazda Motor of America, Inc., sedans and hatchbacks are allegedly so defective they melt in the sun, ooze a gooey substance, give off a noxious chemical odor and become so light-reflective that they make it dangerously difficult to see out the windshield, a proposed class action alleges.

Stan Lee.

Circuit Dubious About Claim to Stan Lee's Characters

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal appeals panel dealt a powerful punch on Thursday to a lawyer whose client, a company founded by comic book legend Stan Lee, claimed to own the rights to his iconic characters.

Supporters of an abortion bill cheer during an anti-abortion rally at the Texas Capitol, Monday, July 8, 2013, in this file photo.

Full Fifth Circuit Won’t Hear Texas Abortion Case

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit decided Thursday that it won’t give full court review to an appeals panel’s decision last week that allowed restrictions on Texas abortion clinics to take effect.

Alex Trebek.

Feds Fine Company That Hired Trebek for Ad Campaign

By Jenna Greene |

A San Diego company that hired "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek to tout its educational products settled Federal Trade Commission charges of deceptive advertising and telemarketing violations on Thursday.

Mark Neubauer.

Court Orders State to Intervene in ‘Unacceptable’ School

By Amanda Bronstad |

A California judge has ordered state officials to do something about “unprecedented and unacceptable” conditions at a Los Angeles high school where students are still waiting for their course assignments two months into the school year.

Kansas Court: FedEx Drivers Are Employees, Not Contractors

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

FedEx Ground Package System, Inc. drivers are employees, not contractors, under Kansas’ wage law, that state’s high court has ruled in a class action.

Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010.

Affiliates Split With National Chamber on BP Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

Gulf Coast chambers of commerce told the U.S. Supreme Court this week that their mothership, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, does not represent them in its support of BP PLC's challenge to the class action settlement stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010.

Affiliates Split With National Chamber on BP Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

Gulf Coast chambers of commerce told the U.S. Supreme Court this week that their mothership, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, does not represent them in its support of BP PLC's challenge to the class action settlement stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

News Outlet Objects to Sealing Push in Bankruptcy Litigation

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A business-oriented news outlet is objecting to motions by plaintiffs—who claim that exposure to Garlock Sealing Technologies LLC’s products caused their asbestos-related illnesses—to seal information about their settlements in the manufacturer’s pending bankruptcy.

$15M Settlement Reached in Debit Card Class Action

By Lisa Hoffman |

A final $15 million settlement has been reached in a consolidated class action alleging Higher One engaged in predatory practices in issuing debit cards to college students, often without their permission, and charging exorbitant fees.

High Court Not Eager to Invade Jury Process

By Marcia Coyle |

Fearful that jury verdicts would come under new attacks, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed reluctant to allow evidence that a juror lied during questioning before trial to be admitted following the trial.

Supreme Court of Nevada.

Nev. Justices Remand Class Action Over Medical Liens

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

A proposed class action over medical liens asserted by a Nevada hospital is going back to a lower court because the health care provider was not given the opportunity to defend against two issues of summary judgment decided against it.

An Amazon.com employee grabs boxes off the conveyor belt to load in a truck at their Fernley, Nev., warehouse.

Justices Split on Pay for Security Screening of Amazon Workers

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday appeared uncertain whether workers at an Amazon warehouse in Nevada should be paid for the time it takes for them to go through anti-theft security screenings at the end of the workday.

Plaintiffs: Tainted-Steroids Defendants Stall Discovery

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The plaintiffs steering committee in litigation over a multistate breakout of meningitis from tainted steroids is seeking to compel disclosure of insurance coverage for a group of Nashville health care pro-viders that allegedly administered the steroids to patients.

NVIDIA Prevails in Securities Class Action Over Defects

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

NVIDIA Corp. beat a securities fraud class action after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that the plaintiffs did not adequately plead that the company acted, at a minimum, with deliberate recklessness to mislead investors about defects in its semiconductor chips.

Health, safety and environment (HSE) workers contracted by BP clean up oil on a beach in Port Fourchon, La., May 23, 2010.

Freeh Demands Return of Cash BP Paid to Alabama Shrimper

By Amanda Bronstad |

A special master overseeing potential fraud in the BP PLC claims process has asked a federal judge to order the return of nearly $240,000 paid to an Alabama boat captain he accused of reporting fake losses in shrimping revenue caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Federal Suit Reiterates Complaint Against Tito’s Vodka

By Lisa Hoffman |

Another legal shot has been taken at Tito’s Handmade Vodka, as a second proposed class action alleges its manufacturer falsely advertise it as made in “an old-fashioned pot” when it actually is mass produced by machines.

Hebrew National beef hot dogs.

Judge Defers Hot-Dog Dispute to a “Higher Authority”

By Lisa Hoffman |

Tossing the case like a hot potato because of its intersection with religion, a Minnesota state judge has dismissed a putative class action alleging that Hebrew National’s hot dogs are not wholly kosher.

AT&T to Pay $105M to Settle Cramming Charges

By Jenna Greene |

AT&T Mobility LLC agreed Wednesday to pay $105 million to settle charges by the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications Commission and attorneys general from 50 states and the District of Columbia that it placed unauthorized charges on mobile phone bills.

The Turtles.

Copyright Ruling Alarms Broadcasters, Streaming Services

By Sheri Qualters |

A California federal judge’s copyright ruling against satellite radio company Sirius XM Holdings Inc. has sent shockwaves through the copyright bar.

David Bateman.

Pro Bono Help Arrives for Victims of Revenge Porn

By Amanda Bronstad |

Last month, K&L Gates launched the Cyber Civil Rights Legal Project, a first-of-its kind pro bono initiative to represent victims of revenge porn.

Gregory Holt

Justices Appear Supportive of Muslim Inmate's Plea to Grow Beard

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court seemed ready on Tuesday to allow a Muslim prisoner in Arkansas to wear a half-inch beard for religious reasons, even though a lawyer for the state said the prison’s "security objectives are undermined" by beards.

William Consovoy, right, and Thomas McCarthy, left, formerly of Wiley Rein, now with their own firm, Consovoy McCarthy.

Ex-Wiley Rein Lawyers Form Appellate Boutique

By Tony Mauro |

Two Wiley Rein partners from the Washington office have left the firm—and they are taking a Supreme Court legal clinic and parts of some high-profile litigation with them.

Plaintiffs Allege Comcast Failed to Preserve Work Records

By Lisa Hoffman |

Plaintiffs in a proposed collective action alleging Comcast Corp. failed to pay overtime to certain employees have asked a Maryland federal judge to sanction the company for willful failure to keep rec-ords that would show how many hours the employees spent on the job.

Hawaiian Makahiki celebration.

Native Hawaiian Inmates Win Class Certification

By Lisa Hoffman |

Hawaiian prisoners incarcerated in Arizona have won certification for their class action alleging they are unconstitutionally prohibited from practicing their native religion.

Appeals Court Restricts Mandatory Immigration Detention

By Mike Scarcella |

Two immigrants who were taken into federal custody years after their release on state charges are not subject to a mandatory-detention provision of federal law, a federal appeals court said Monday. The unanimous decision restricts the power of the government to hold certain aliens without bond.

Motions Debate Access to Asbestos Plaintiffs’ Files

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

Garlock Sealing Technologies LLC and two other related defendants are opposing motions to keep sealed the names of asbestos plaintiffs and the amounts of settlements they have reached with those plaintiffs.

Japanese Tractor Manufacturer Absolved in Accident

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The Alabama Supreme Court has reversed a $900,000 products-liability verdict in favor of an Alabama man injured in a tractor rollover accident.

Dow Chemical corporate headquarters in Midland, Michigan.

Tenth Circuit Upholds $1B Dow Polyurethane Judgment

By Amaris Elliott-Engel |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit has upheld a $1 billion antitrust class action judgment against Dow Chemical Co. involving a conspiracy to fix prices for polyurethane products.

Mark Neubauer.

California Judge Asked to Intercede in School Schedule

By Amanda Bronstad |

A California judge is weighing whether to order state officials to intervene at a Los Angeles high school where students allege that administrative chaos has deprived them of “meaningful instruction time.”

Jonathan Adler of Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

Eyes on Sixth Circuit for Next Move on Same-Sex Marriage

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to sweep same-sex marriage cases off its docket Monday is intensifying the spotlight on six marriage cases pending before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Supreme Court's Silence on Marriage Rights Speaks Volumes

By Marcia Coyle |

By declining to take up any of the same-sex marriage cases pending before it on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court defied the conventional wisdom that it finally would resolve the debate over the constitutionality of state bans on those marriages.

Supreme Court's Silence on Marriage Rights Speaks Volumes

By Marcia Coyle |

By declining to take up any of the same-sex marriage cases pending before it on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court defied the conventional wisdom that it finally would resolve the debate over the constitutionality of state bans on those marriages.

Bancroft's Paul Clement

Docket Chat: Clement's Milestone and a Jones Day Associate's Debut

By Tony Mauro |

Amid the anticipation surrounding the U.S. Supreme Court's handling of the same-sex marriage issue, the court is proceeding with its usual docket of important, if less headline-grabbing, cases in the next two weeks.

Empty-Handed: Federal agents lead human-trafficking victims out of a Farmingville, N.Y., bar in 2009. A new yearlong study found restitution orders “are the exception, not the rule” in such cases.

Human Trafficking Cases Rarely Result in Restitution, Study Says

By Katelyn Polantz |

Even though federal law mandates human traffickers compensate the people they force into slavery or prostitution, prosecutors and courts too rarely enforce the law, according to a report released last week by a pro bono legal team.