Courts & Litigation

U.S. Federal Trade Commission building

Asset Seizures Gone Wrong

By Jenna Greene |

In 2014, the FTC won asset freezes coupled with temporary restraining orders in 29 cases naming 145 companies and 82 individuals, a 45 percent increase from 2013, according to an analysis by The National Law Journal.

U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

Government Asks Court to Toss Chrysler Dealerships Suit

By Lalita Clozel |

The U.S. government has moved to dismiss a suit from 18 former Chrysler dealerships that lost their contracts with the automaker during its bankruptcy proceeding in 2009.

Verdicts & Settlements

A summary of this week's notable cases.

Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Another Win for Business

By Marcia Coyle |

Out-of-state defendants in class actions and other lawsuits do not have to provide evidence supporting their efforts to remove their cases from state court to federal court, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Dec. 15 in a key victory for the business community.

Civil Actions

Cases recently filed in the Washington-area district courts.

Target.

Judge Refuses to Dismiss Target Data-Breach Class Action

By Amanda Bronstad |

In its attempt to toss out a sweeping class action filed over last holiday season’s massive data breach, Target Corp. didn’t get exactly what it wanted.

Women with posters of the Cuban Five celebrate their release, in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.

Judge Dismisses Cases of Freed Members of Cuban Five

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Florida on Thursday closed the federal criminal and civil cases involving the three members of the "Cuban Five" released in a prisoner swap earlier this week.

Executions Continue Decades-Long Decline, With Exceptions

By Marcia Coyle |

The number of death sentences and executions continued to decline in 2014, with a small handful of states bucking the decades-long trend.

Jon Fitch at the UFC 111 weigh-ins.  March 26, 2010.

‘Ultimate Fighting Championship’ Hit With Antitrust Class Action

By Lalita Clozel |

The Ultimate Fighting Championship, a dominant promoter of mixed martial arts, has been slapped with a putative antitrust class action.

Okla. Supreme Court Vacates $7M Legal Fee Award

By Lisa Hoffman |

The Supreme Court of Oklahoma has ruled a trial court judge abused his discretion when he awarded $7 million to plaintiffs’ lawyers when the total settlement award was only $46,000 total for Volkswagen owners in a class action over an alleged body defect.

Mary Barra.

Michigan Judge May Defer to Delaware Court in GM Action

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge in Michigan is considering whether to stay a consolidated shareholder derivative case against General Motors Co. over its ignition-switch recalls pending another judge’s ruling in a similar action in Delaware, according to a lawyer in the case.

A Nativity scene is on display on the lawn of the Franklin County Courthouse in Brookville. The ACLU of Indiana has filed a lawsuit alleging the display is a violation of the First Amendment.

O Little Town of Litigation: A Holiday Lawsuit Roundup

By Zoe Tillman |

'Tis the season to get litigious. The National Law Journal unwraps holiday-related legal action across the country.

Macy’s, Jeans Maker Fight Suit Over ‘Made in USA’ Labels

By Lalita Clozel |

Macy’s Inc. and jeans maker Citizens of Humanity LLC struck back in a putative class action over allegedly misleading “Made in the U.S.A.” labels.

Defense Lawyers Move to Consolidate Baby Wipes Class Actions

By Lisa Hoffman |

Defense attorneys are asking the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation to consolidate and trans-fer to a New York federal court six putative federal class actions aimed at the manufacturer and sellers of allegedly contaminated baby wipes.

Chick-Fil-A, Cherry Company Sued By Consumer in Texas

By Laura Castro |

A woman who claims she suffered a heart attack as a result of biting a cherry atop a Chick-Fil-A milkshake is suing the fast-food chain and a cherries manufacturer in Texas state court.

NJOY E-Cig Maker Moves to Dismiss Suit Over Ads

By Lisa Hoffman |

Electronic cigarette maker NJOY has moved to dismiss a putative class action’s claims that the company’s ads are deceptive, calling the allegations hot air and defending its choice of words as nothing more than puffery.

100% Pure Caffeine Anhydrous USP Powder sold by NutriVitaShop.

Pressure Mounts to Control Powdered Caffeine Sales

By Laura Castro |

The Center for Science in the Public Interest has formally petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban retail sales of pure, powdered or liquid caffeine as a dietary supplement, saying it has caused illness and deaths.

Special Master Seeks Return of Additional BP Claims Money

By Amanda Bronstad |

A special master responsible for identifying fraudulent claims against BP PLC’s $9.2 billion settlement over its 2010 oil spill is asking for the return of $580,000 paid to three commercial fishermen who submitted allegedly false tax returns.

Criminal Charges in Tainted Steroids Deaths, Infections

By Sheri Qualters |

Federal prosecutors have indicted 14 individuals connected to New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc.’s tainted steroids, which were implicated in at least 64 deaths and 751 infections from fungal meningitis starting in 2012.

False Safety-Ratings Claims Survive Against GM

By Lalita Clozel |

A federal judge has refused to dismiss a putative class action against General Motors Co. over allegedly misleading car safety ratings stickers.

Plaintiffs Appeal Rejection of P.F. Chang Data Claims

By Lisa Hoffman |

Plaintiffs in a proposed class action over a data security breach at P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Inc. swiftly appealed an Illinois federal judge’s dismissal of their suit on the ground they had not shown they had suffered actual harm.

Michelle Kosilek.

Court Rejects Sex Reassignment Surgery for Prison Inmate

By Sheri Qualters |

A divided federal appeals court on Tuesday overruled a Boston federal judge who ordered taxpayer-funded sex reassignment surgery for a convicted murder suffering from gender identity disorder.

Congressman Blake Farenthold talks with Corpus Chrisiti Army Depot employee, Ross Gonzales, during a meet and greet at Boardwalk Café in Coprus Christi, Texas on NAS Drive Thursday, August 8, 2013.

Fired Hill Aide Sues Over Gender Discrimination, Hostile Workplace

By Mike Sacks |

A former staffer in the office of Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Tex., is suing her old workplace alleging she was illegally fired in a sexually-charged environment after she complained about mistreatment.

General Motors Headquarters in Detroit, Michigan.

Plaintiffs Culled, but Defect Claims Advance Against GM

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge in New York has allowed a consolidated consumer class action to go forward against General Motors Co. over its ignition switch recalls—although on a limited basis.

Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law.

SMU Law Prof's Comments Prompt Harassment Policy Review

By Karen Sloan |

A complaint by a student at the Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law that her professor in 2010 referred to her as a “bitch” and “hired bimbo” spurred a federal investigation into the university’s handling of complaints involving sexual harassment, sexual violence and other Title IX violations.

La. Court: Diagnosis Doesn’t Merit Reopening Toxic Lawsuit

By Lalita Clozel |

The Louisiana Supreme Court reversed a grant of exemplary damages to a man who had revisited a chemical exposure suit against Exxon Mobil Corp. after learning he had contracted prostate cancer.

Judge Rules Safeway Breached Online Shopping Contract

By Lisa Hoffman |

A California federal judge has sided with online customers of Safeway Inc., who alleged in a class action that the store breached its contract by charging them more for groceries they ordered on the Internet than had they made the purchases in a store.

Targets Revises Junk-Fax Settlement to Please Judge

By Lisa Hoffman |

Target Corp. has suggested changes to make a proposed class-action settlement more palatable to a Minnesota federal judge, who had blocked a deal in the robotext litigation for, among other things, permitting much of the award to revert to the company.

Complaint: SeaWorld Overcharged for Annual Passes

By Lisa Hoffman |

Already battling animal-rights and securities litigation involving its treatment of killer whales, SeaWorld Entertainment Inc., now faces a proposed class action alleging the company is breaching its contract with annual pass holders.

Ray Boucher.

New L.A. Plaintiffs Firm Focused on ‘Social Justice’

By Amanda Bronstad |

Prominent California plaintiffs attorney Raymond Boucher has set up his own shop to establish a practice focused on “social justice.”

Ninth Circuit OKs Enforcement of Condom Mandate in Porn

By Amanda Bronstad |

The pornography business struck out again on Monday in its constitutional challenge to a 2012 California ballot initiative that requires adult film stars to wear condoms.

Judge Sets Stage for Boston Tobacco Trial Next Spring

By Sheri Qualters |

A Boston federal judge has narrowed an eight-year-old class action filed by smokers who want cigarette maker Philip Morris to pay for early-stage lung cancer detection.

Justices Ease Class Actions Removal to Federal Court

By Marcia Coyle |

Out-of-state defendants in class actions and other lawsuits do not have to provide evidence supporting their efforts to remove their cases from state court to federal court, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday in a key victory for the business community.

Lawsuit Claims Hep C Drugmaker is Price-Gouging

By Lisa Hoffman |

A drug company allegedly is gouging patients and insurers by charging $84,000 for a course of treatment with its new Hepatitis C drug, which successfully treats as much as 90 percent of those infected, according to a proposed class action filed by a Pennsylvania state agency.

Court Upholds Dismissal of Drivers' Suit Over Alcohol Tester

By Lalita Clozel |

Two New Jersey residents who had been charged with drunk driving have lost their putative class action suit against the maker of device that measures alcohol levels in drivers.

MDL Panel Issues Orders on Home Depot and Other Cases

By Amanda Bronstad |

The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has issued its first orders following this month’s hearing. On Dec. 11, the panel ordered more than 30 consumer class actions filed over a data breach at The Home Depot Inc. be coordinated in Georgia, where the home improvement retailer is based in Atlanta.

Suit Filed over Supplement's 'Brain Power' Claims

By Laura Castro |

Bayer Healthcare LLC has been hit with a putative class action in California federal court by a consumer alleging the health care giant is deceiving the public with marketing claims that its Flintstones gummies dietary supplement supports and boosts brain power.

High Court Sides With N.C. Police Officer Who Misunderstood Law

By Marcia Coyle |

Police officers who base searches and seizures on a mistaken understanding of the law do not automatically run afoul of the Fourth Amendment, according to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Monday in a case involving a faulty brake light.

A statue representing women's empowerment stands in front of a Planned Parenthood facility in Tucson, Ariz.

Court Lets Stand Injunction Against Arizona Abortion Limits

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to step into the legal battle over Arizona's law regulating drug-induced abortions.

<b>DANGEROUS HARVEST:</b> Chiquita acknowledged that its former Colombian subsidiary paid protection money to paramilitary groups. Victims of those groups seek documents that describe the details.

Chiquita Asks Court to Shield Records of Pay to Paramilitary

By Jenna Greene |

In a case that tests ­confidentiality provisions at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Chiquita Brands International Inc. last week squared off against the agency in a potentially ground-breaking Freedom of Information Act suit before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)

CIA Tactics Questioned

By Mike Sacks and Zoe Tillman |

The release last week of a redacted version of the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on the CIA's post-Sept. 11, 2001, intelligence gathering cast fresh light upon the role attorneys played in the agency's "cruel, inhuman, and degrading" interrogation methods.

<b>BENJAMIN CRUMP:</b> Florida lawyer represents the Texas plaintiff and Michael Brown’s family.

Ruling Could Bolster Lawsuits Against Police

By Tony Mauro |

A little-noticed U.S. Supreme Court ruling from May could give an unexpected boost to alleged victims of excessive force by police in their efforts to hold law enforcement officers accountable.

Mount Everest North Face as seen from the path to the base camp, Tibet.

NLRB Divides Over ‘Mount Everest’ of Union Regulations

By Jenna Greene |

A divided National Labor Relations Board on Friday adopted a new rule that speeds up and simplifies the process for holding union elections, prompting a sharp dissent from the two Republican members.

General Mills Settles Four Suits Over ‘Nature Valley’ Granola Bars

By Laura Castro |

General Mills Inc. has settled four proposed class actions alleging the company use of the term “100% Natural” on its Nature Valley products was deceptive and misleading because they contain genetically modified organisms and other synthetic ingredients.

Conn. Judge Dismisses Suit Over Medicare Claims

By Lalita Clozel |

A federal judge has quashed a putative class action against the Secretary of Health and Human Services over the Medicare denial-of-claim review process.

MLB Faces Another Suit Over Minor Leaguers’ Pay, Contracts

By Lisa Hoffman |

Major League Baseball is now facing the third proposed class action this year that drills the sport’s governing body and 30 teams for allegedly exploiting minor league players with pay and contract practices.

Suit Alleges Maker’s Mark Distillery Deceives Consumers

By Lisa Hoffman |

Maker’s Mark has become the third prominent distillery this year to face a proposed class action over alleged false advertising—in this case for marketing its bourbon as “handmade” from an “old antique roller mill.” The suit contends Maker’s Mark is mass produced with modern equipment.

Is UVA Rape Story Actionable?

By Zoe Tillman |

As criticism of Rolling Stone mounts over the magazine’s sensational story of sexual assault at the University of Virginia, a UVA associate dean, a student featured in the article and others associated with the controversy are lawyering up.

Ruling Near on Dismissal Motion in Target Data Breach

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge in Minnesota is set to decide whether to dismiss lawsuits filed by Target Corp.’s customers over its massive data breach last year.

Suit: ACA Insurer Delayed Surgery for Injured Claimant

By Amanda Bronstad |

A sports videographer enrolled in a medical plan under the Affordable Care Act has sued Health Net of California Inc. for failing to treat an injured hand that has rendered him unable to do his job.

Texas Court Says Judge Erred in Granting New Trial in Products Case

By Laura Castro |

The Fifth Court of Appeals in Texas has ruled a trial court erred when it decided medical company Zimmer Inc. must retry a metal implant suit because of alleged juror misconduct.

Fla. Judge Refuses to Dismiss Class Action in Truckers’ Case

By Lalita Clozel |

A Florida federal judge refused to dismiss a putative class action when a transportation company offered the named plaintiffs—two former truck drivers—twice their claimed damages.

Fraud Claims Lodged Against Comcast Wi-Fi Network

By Lisa Hoffman |

Comcast Corp. allegedly has built a secondary Wi-Fi network on the routers of residential customers without informing them or getting permission, according to a proposed class action that also alleges the piggybacked network will raise consumers’ electric bills and compromise their Internet security.

Judge Refuses to Approve Whirlpool Pollution Settlement

By Lisa Hoffman |

Questioning whether prospective class members were well represented, an Arkansas federal judge has refused to certify a class action against Whirlpool Corp., and thus torpedoed a $2.9 million preliminary settlement between the company and property owners who claim pollution from Whirlpool’s former plant has hurt property values.

The Kalamazoo River.

Settlement Reached After Oil Leak in Kalamazoo River

By Lalita Clozel |

Enbridge has agreed to a settlement with residents and businesses whose properties were damaged or devalued by a July 2010 oil leak into the Kalamazoo River.

Aetna Slammed Over Outside Attorney ‘Eyes-Only’ Discovery

By Sheri Qualters |

A Colorado federal judge has sanctioned Aetna Inc. and two of its subsidiaries in a patent case because defense lawyers designated more than 90 percent of documents they produced as viewable only by the plaintiffs’ outside lawyers.

Bill Cosby performing at the Maxwell C. King Center for the Performing Arts, in Melbourne, Florida, on November 21, 2014.

Another Lawsuit Accuses Bill Cosby of Sexual Assault

By Amanda Bronstad |

A second lawsuit involving sexual assault accusations against comedian Bill Cosby has been filed—this time, on behalf of an attorney in California.

Garlock Asbestos Plaintiffs Suffer Another Setback

By Lalita Clozel |

A federal judge has sided again with gasket maker Garlock in an asbestos bankruptcy case, declining plaintiffs’ motion to reopen an estimation hearing that they said had lacked key evidence.

Joshua Rosenkranz of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe

Court Weighs Time Limits on Claims Against Government

By Marcia Coyle |

Waging legal battle against Uncle Sam is always difficult, but could become more so if the U.S. Supreme Court agrees with arguments the Obama administration offered on Wednesday that certain tort claims against the government are barred forever.

New FDA Rule Controls Drug Warnings for Pregnant Women

By Laura Castro |

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has published a final rule that changes the way consumer information is presented on prescription drugs and biological products used during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Starbucks Lawsuit Survives Against Ham Suppliers

By Laura Castro |

A federal judge has ruled Starbucks Corp. can continue its $4.8 million lawsuit against meat suppliers for allegedly supplying poor quality and potentially unsafe ham for breakfast and lunch sandwiches sold at Starbuck stores across the United States and Canada.

Suit Challenging Verizon’s Discarded Policy Rejected

By Lalita Clozel |

An appeals court sided with Verizon Wireless LLC in a putative class action over the company’s former policy of allowing debt collectors to record individuals without their consent.

Paul Hughes of Mayer Brown

Mayer Brown Associate Makes Supreme Court Debut

By Tony Mauro |

Most 31-year-old associates don’t get to argue at the U.S. Supreme Court, especially when they work at a firm full of veteran advocates who could pull rank and take on the assignment. But Paul Hughes of Mayer Brown did just that on Dec. 3, appearing in a tricky trademark tacking case.

Second U.S. Circuit Judge Jon O. Newman

When Supreme Court Mondays Brought a Torrent of Decisions

By Tony Mauro |

The first opinions of the current term began trickling out of the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. A former high court law clerk recently recalled the days, nearly 60 years ago, when decisions came out in a torrent.

Action Accuses Insurer of Stinting on Mental Health Care

By Lisa Hoffman |

Motivated by its own cost-saving interests, United Behavioral Health regularly denies claims for outpatient treatment of mental health disorders in seriously ill patients in violation of its fiduciary duties under federal law, according to a proposed class action.

John Yoo, left, and Jay Bybee, right.

CIA Misled Justice Dept. Lawyers, Senate Report Says

By Zoe Tillman and Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Department of Justice did not do an independent analysis to verify information it received from the CIA about interrogation tactics, a Senate Intelligence Committee report, published on Tuesday, concluded.

Federal Suit Challenges Mass. Law Against Campaign Lies

By Sheri Qualters |

A Massachusetts political action committee has asked a Boston federal judge to block a lawsuit seeking prosecution of one of its officials under a state law that criminalizes allegedly false statements made during political campaigns.

In this Nov. 13, 2002 photo, an Amazon employee packages an order to be shipped from its Coffeyville, Kan., warehouse.

Supreme Court Backs Amazon on No Overtime for Security Screenings

By Tony Mauro |

Companies that require employees to go through security screenings at the end of their workday are not required to pay overtime, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Court: Juror's Voir Dire Lie No Basis to Challenge Verdict

By Marcia Coyle |

Evidence that a juror lied during questioning by lawyers before trial can not be used to support a motion for a new trial, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Court: Juror's Voir Dire Lie No Basis to Challenge Verdict

By Marcia Coyle |

Evidence that a juror lied during questioning by lawyers before trial can not be used to support a motion for a new trial, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Philip J. Hirschkop of Hirschkop & Associates in his office.

'Loving' Litigator Says He's 'Not Done Yet'

By Marcia Coyle |

A conversation with Philip Hirschkop, who argued and won a landmark ruling in Loving v. Virginia.

Magistrate To Rule on Revamped Occupy Oakland Settlement

By Lisa Hoffman |

A second million-dollar class action settlement stemming from mass arrests during Occupy Oakland demonstrations will head to federal court on Dec. 17, when a magistrate will assess the deal that could provide close to $3,000 for each of 360 protesters rounded up by police.

Parham Williams.

Duncan School of Law Wins Provisional ABA Accreditation

By Karen Sloan |

Three years and one lawsuit later, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law has won provisional accreditation from the American Bar Association.

Remington Model 700 rifle.

Remington Settles Rifle Trigger Class Action

By Lisa Hoffman |

Remington Arms Co. has agreed to replace the trigger mechanism in as many as 8 million of its iconic Model 700 bolt-action rifles, according to the terms of a settlement in a putative class action that alleged a defect allowed the rifle to fire even when the trigger is not pulled.

Plaintiffs Booted from Toxic Gas Case

By Lalita Clozel |

Plaintiffs’ case in a suit against Chalmette Refining LLC, a Louisiana plant that released toxic gases into the air in October 2011, suffered a setback on Dec. 2.

DISH Network Sued for Month-Long Blackout

By Lalita Clozel |

DISH Network LLC faces a potential class action over its month-long blackout of several major channels earlier this year.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration main campus building.

FDA Warns Against Use of Fibroid Morcellators

By Laura Castro |

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning against the use of laparoscopic power morcellators in the removal of the uterus or fibroids in women.

Herbalife to Settle Case Claiming Pyramid Scheme

By Lalita Clozel |

A judge has granted preliminary approval of a $15 million settlement between Herbalife, Ltd. and several former distributors accusing the dietary supplement of running a "pyramid scheme."

Justices Gingerly Join Debate Over Internet Sales Taxes

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday scratched the surface of the looming battle over state taxation of Internet retailers and seemed troubled by what it saw.

The U.S. Supreme Court justices in 2010. Top row (left to right): Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito, and Associate Justice Elena Kagan. Bottom row (left to right): Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy, and Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

What the Justices Say About the High Court Bar

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court justices acknowledge and generally embrace the dominance of veteran advocates in the work of the court, according to a series of stories published by Reuters Monday.

Joseph F. Rice of Motley Rice

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Appeal of Oil Spill Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday eliminated what could have been a major roadblock in the multibillion-dollar settlement reached in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill four years ago.

Joseph F. Rice of Motley Rice

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Appeal of Oil Spill Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday eliminated what could have been a major roadblock in the multibillion-dollar settlement reached in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill four years ago.

Betsy Benjaminson.

Judge Mulls Sanctions Over Docs

By Amanda Bronstad |

When Toyota Motor Corp.'s attorneys learned this year that a former translator was posting thousands of internal documents related to its sudden-acceleration recalls on her blog, they rushed to court hoping a federal judge would intervene.

Protest at Harvard Law School in support of Michael Brown, the black teenager that was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.  December 1, 2014.

Law Students Call For Justice

By Karen Sloan |

Law students across the country have mobilized in the wake of Brown's murder and subsequent police killings of minorities. They have called for the federal government to prosecute police officer Darren Wilson — a possibility that Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. alluded to during a Dec. 1 speech at Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Civil Actions

Cases recently filed in the Washington-area district courts.

Travis Lenkner of Gerchen Keller Capital.

Third-Party Litigation Funding Hitting Its Stride

By Sheri Qualters |

The industry is growing and the practice is more accepted, but critics want transparency when it's used.

<b>SPEECH:</b> The high court said Edward Lane’s sworn testimony was constitutionally protected.

Retaliation Lawsuit Heading to Trial

By Marcia Coyle |

In the U.S. Supreme Court, sometimes you win the battle only to lose the war, and sometimes you survive to fight another day. Edward Lane has experienced it all.

Verdicts & Settlements

A summary of this week's notable cases.

Michael Mann, professor of meteorology and geosciences at Pennsylvania State University.

Speech Test In Scientist's Lawsuit

By Zoe Tillman |

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals is poised to issue novel rulings on First Amendment law in a prominent scientist's defamation lawsuit against ­climate change skeptics.

Suit Faults Collection Agency’s Use of DA Letterhead

By Lisa Hoffman |

Debt collector CorrectiveSolutions uses official-looking letterhead it “rents” for $20 each from California district attorneys to allegedly mislead debtors into thinking they’ll face prosecution if they don’t make good on what they owe, according to a proposed class action.

Ugandan gays and their supporters attending a conference to promote homosexuals rights in Uganda. February 14, 2014.

Ugandan Gay Advocates' Suit Proceeds Against Lawyer

By Sheri Qualters |

A federal appellate court has rejected lawyer and minister Scott Lively's unusual bid to throw out a case against him that claims he promoted the repression of homosexuals in Uganda.

Ex-Employee Sues over Faulty Background Check

By Lisa Hoffman |

A Kansas man, who allegedly lost his job after a background check mistakenly showed two felonies and three misdemeanors on his record, has filed a proposed class action against the largest staffing company in the nation for alleged violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

Rick Wagoner.

Judge Orders GM to Produce Employee Performance Evaluations

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge has ordered General Motors Co. to produce performance evaluations of 32 current and former employees, including many in the legal department who were highlighted in an internal report for failing to alert senior executives about a dangerous ignition-switch defect.

Bankruptcy Plan Would Give $135M to Meningitis Victims

By Sheri Qualters |

Victims of a meningitis outbreak from tainted drugs would get at least $135 million in the proposed bankruptcy plan for the now defunct pharmaceutical company that made the steroid drugs.

Arm & Hammer Essentials Unscented deodorant

Lawsuit Claims Unscented Deodorants Smell

By Laura Castro |

A consumer has filed a proposed class action against Revlon Inc., The Procter & Gamble Co. Inc. and other companies in New Jersey federal court, alleging they make, market and sell "unscented" deodorant products that fail the smell test.

Appeals Court Revives Suit Over Pizza Chain’s Texts

By Lalita Clozel |

An Eleventh Circuit judge revived a putative class action against Pizza Hut on Dec. 1, following a similar ruling in a suit against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers football team.

Kevin Johnson.

California Campuses To Aid Undocumented Students

By Karen Sloan |

Undocumented students at six of the University of California’s 10 campuses will soon have access to free legal help under a new program spearheaded by the University of California, Davis School of Law.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Court Reverses Order Dismissing Case Against Tampa Bay Bucs

By Lalita Clozel |

An appellate court ruled in Stein, D.D.S.; M.S.D.; P.A. et al v. Buccaneers Limited Partnership that an offer of full relief to named plaintiffs could not moot a class action.

Cargill to Settle Suit Over Truvia Marketing

By Lisa Hoffman |

Cargill will pay $6.1 million to settle a class action targeting its marketing of Truvia sweeteners as “natural,” but the company will still be permitted to use that adjective on labels and advertising to describe the products.

Fantasy Sports Site Sued Over Alleged Deceptive Marketing

By Lisa Hoffman |

FanDuel Inc., a major actor in the popular online fantasy sports realm, is facing a proposed class action that alleges the site lures daily players with false and deceptive marketing that promises to match their initial deposits required to play, but never does.