ABA Releases Details of Law Schools Enrollment Declines

, The National Law Journal

   | 5 Comments

Thirteen law schools saw 1L enrollment drop by 30 percent or more, according to data released by the American Bar Association.

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What's being said

  • not available

    The quote from Dean Agrawal should be followed by "she wrote" rather than "he wrote." I am proud of her work at my alma mater on this and other matters.

  • not available

    Law schools are scrambling to keep themselves in existence. They just want to protect incoming tuition money and law professor jobs where they work 3-6 hours a week. Dean O‘Brien and New England Law is a prime example. The law school is bottom ranked, low admission criteria, poor job prospects, and yet Dean O‘Brien was paid $867,000---the highest in the nation reportedly.

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    There is the additional fact, left unexamined, that applicants want to attend schools in growing legal markets, i.e., thriving cities, especially considering they‘ve been told they won‘t have any geographic mobility if they go to a school outside the top 10 or 15. No one wants to try to get an attorney position in Lexington, KY; Iowa City; Cleveland; Long Island; College Station, TX; etc. That‘s professional suicide.

    Read more: http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202645247048/ABA-Releases-Details-of-Law-Schools-Enrollment-Declines

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    There is the additional fact, left unexamined, that applicants want to attend schools in growing legal markets, i.e., thriving cities, especially considering they‘ve been told they want have any geographic mobility if they go to a school outside the top 10 or 15. No one wants to try to get an attorney position in Lexington, KY; Iowa City; Cleveland; Long Island; College Station, TX; etc. That‘s professional suicide.

  • not available

    Let this rationalization continuea pace for years to come. America needs more lawyers like it needs a hole in the head.

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