ABA backs off making law schools report graduates' salaries

, The National Law Journal

   | 4 Comments

The ABA's Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar on March 17 gave preliminary approval to a new accreditation standard that would require law schools to report additional details about the jobs that their graduates land — but not salary information.

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What's being said

  • Becky

    In my mind, law school is about a lot more than how much money you make as a graduate. It is also about how it prepares you as a leader on legal policy issues and as an attorney for people of all income levels. Unless I am missing the details of how salaties would be accounted for, it seems that salary data would only deter schools from encouraging students to pursue public interest careers. I would hope that the most elite schools would be encouraging students to use their education for the public good.

  • Becky

    In my mind, law school is about a lot more than how much money you make as a graduate. It is also about how it prepares you as a leader on legal policy issues and as an attorney for people of all income levels. Unless I am missing the details of how salaties would be accounted for, it seems that salary data would only deter schools from encouraging students to pursue public interest careers. I would hope that the most elite schools would be encouraging students to use their education for the public good.

  • GRS

    I hope they stick to their decision on this. It is the right one. Accurate salary information is difficult to get. It is not all about what prospective students want. There are issues of privacy and autonomy involved. The state-based salary information, combined with all the other things that schools will now be required to report, is enough to allow a reasonable person to make a decision about whether to go to law school, or to a particular law school. McEntee is being utterly disingenuous. He knows full well that schools that report salaries based upon a small number-- let alone the figure of 10 or more respondents that he suggested-- will be roundly criticized as misleading prospective students-- if not more than just criticized. It is clear that prospective students are being encouraged to view this consumer information as a kind of promise of what their future lives as lawyers will be like. Any information that is likely to be misleading, or misunderstood, or misused, should not be included.

  • Robert A.

    I hate to say this, but when did figuring out future employment prospects become the responsibility of the school. Why does the legal profession feel as though they ought to be afforded some unnamed right to be given data relevant to their own future. Education is what you make it, if you went to law school thinking that you would make millions, somewhere you might have forgotten that first, you need to represent people and then maybe you might have a chance at some real money. School is to prepare you for a entry level profession, not promise you a job. To be quite honest I have a number of friends that pursued medical careers and after many years working for very little and now have the opportunity to earn more. This whole argument is contrary to the position of education and I think prospective counselors need to do their research just like any other career choice and to stop blaming others for their lack of research and success ayalatax.com

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