Restaurateur, suppliers sue to overturn California's foie gras ban

, The National Law Journal


Two food distributors and a restaurant owner in the Los Angeles area have sued the state of California to overturn its new ban on the feeding practices used in the production of foie gras.

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What's being said

  • Chance

    I don't see how the State of California has an interest in the cruel treatment of ducks. My sense is the plaintiffs should have thrown a First Amendment claim in their lawsuit as the feeding of ducks could be symbolic speech. The due process and the commerce clause claims seem weak. Any taking of property seems indirect. And the clause is a restriction on the federal government's authority, not California's government. But then I only took one Con Law class in law school.

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