Scant improvement for women's representation on bench

, The National Law Journal

   | 6 Comments

The percentage of women state court judges inched up this year, according to data reported by the Center for Women in Government & Civil Society at the State University of New York-Albany.

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What's being said

  • PMS alert

    Reasonable women are good to have on the bench. But what about those who are inclined to have moodswings, especially those related to PMS or cramps? I've seen them make rulings that have no resemblance to what the law actually requires. If voters agree, whose fault is that?

  • PMS alert

    Reasonable women are good to have on the bench. But what about those who are inclined to have moodswings, especially those related to PMS or cramps? I've seen them make rulings that have no resemblance to what the law actually requires. If voters agree, whose fault is that?

  • PMS alert

    Reasonable women are good to have on the bench. But what about those who are inclined to have moodswings, especially those related to PMS or cramps? I've seen them make rulings that have no resemblance to what the law actually requires. If voters agree, whose fault is that?

  • PMS alert

    Reasonable women are good to have on the bench. But what about those who are inclined to have moodswings, especially those related to PMS or cramps? I've seen them make rulings that have no resemblance to what the law actually requires. If voters agree, whose fault is that?

  • PMS alert

    Reasonable women are good to have on the bench. But what about those who are inclined to have moodswings, especially those related to PMS or cramps? I've seen them make rulings that have no resemblance to what the law actually requires. If voters agree, whose fault is that?

  • lawgeek

    The only explanation possible is that evil men are conspiring to keep women off the bench.Yawn.As a former civil rights investigator theres alot more to it than looking at numbers.However doing your homework and writing a decent truthful article doesnt support your agenda of using numbers to lobby Conress to pass more laws to control people and forward your political agenda Next its money then next its any other issue you decide needs controlled.Sad that law school is now more about brainwashing students into liberal policies of control and indoctrination than the law.

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