Judge skeptical about graduates' claim that Brooklyn Law School committed fraud

, The National Law Journal

   | 6 Comments

The fraud class action brought by graduates of Brooklyn Law School against their alma mater appears to be turning into an uphill battle. Attorneys for both sides spent three hours before Kings County, N.Y., Supreme Court Justice David Schmidt on August 21 debating the law school's motion to dismiss.

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What's being said

  • Runshyt

    The post below misses the central issue here. The schools' practice of false advertising is not new. Even when the economy was strong the schools were falsely advertising their employment stats and misleading their applicants. Moreover, the fact that law school applicants are primarily motivated by the prospects of obtaining good-paying legal jobs (or at least having access to them, i.e. "interviews" for them) is not mutually exclusive of their stated altruistic desires to help improve the legal field or provide access for less fortunate citizens (as professed in their personal statements). Even students seeking biglaw employment often have altruistic reasons for pursuing the law as a career; the fact that their personal statements do not mention their desires for good-paying jobs do not undermine their stated altruism. The schools are committing fraud by every definition. The plaintiffs have an uphill battle because they're essentially asking judges to turn on their bretheren. These lawsuits are a job for Congress and the USDOJ. Let's see how much bs they spit when those entities come after them - and they will.

  • Oirene

    A review of some of the personal statements on law school applications would reveal the real reasons for wanting to get a law degree. Did any of them say they wanted to attend their particular law school because of the statistics or because they wanted to learn the law and that happened to be the school to which they were admitted based on LSAT scores.

    As others have said, these graduates need to take responsibility for their financial situation. Would they be complaining about the statistics, if they had found jobs right out of law school.They are in this situation because the economy has tanked. There are others to blame for this situation.

  • Oirene

    A review of some of the personal statements on law school applications would reveal the real reasons for wanting to get a law degree. Did any of them say they wanted to attend that particular law school because of the statistics or because they wanted to learn the law.

    As others have said, these graduates need to take responsibility for their financial situation. Would they be complaining abou the statistics if they had found jobs right out of law school. It's the economy that tanked, not the law schools.

  • Deb

    The real beef is against the company asking for and disseminating the data. Brooklyn and Albany did not choose not to disclose certain data. The entity gathering the data either failed to ask the right questions or did not disclose the information they received. Not everyone who goes to law school intends to practice law. Law school training equips you for a host of professions. Logical reasoning, analytic skills ad the ability to communicate form a solid foundation for success. These kids should stop whining and find work. Stop blaming others for the failure to turn your degree into dollars.

  • Lulaine

    The reasoning of the law schools has a flaw in some huge ways. The first being the school's word is what most students take as the highest regard. The fact that students actually took the school's word for it instead of other sources should not be held against them. The law schools know these cases are potential bell weather cases. If even one of these gets validated then there is going to be a massive push to settle and avoid what is going to be enforced lawsuits.

    http://www.legalfunding.com/

  • Old timer

    The employment statistics provided by the law schools doubtless were deceptive, and most likely intentionally so. That said, any individual with the thought of perusing a career in the law, might reasonably be expected not to rely exclusively on such self-serving school-provided information in determining whether to enroll in the particular institution. A more thorough inquiry by way of satisfying one 's due diligence obligation would have readily detected the deception. In the circumstances, I have little sympathy for the plaintiffs' cause.

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