Just Breathe

Law schools seek the cure for stressed-out students.

The National Law Journal

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Research suggests that by the 3L year, 40 percent of law students show signs of depression. Fortunately, educators are responding with programs intended to promote student 'wellness.' In our latest report, we look at the trend and also preview three newly opened law schools, and prominent attorneys offer budding law students the benefit of their experience.

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What's being said

  • noel99m

    This reads more like an opinion than an authoritative article. Author please cite the research source. Is this a synopsis of the article?

  • research suggests this statement is 40% bunk

    Wow - this has all the earmarks of a bloviated statistic. First question, when you say

    "research suggests", what research? Second, when you say show "signs of depression", what signs?



    Is it too much to ask that the writer provide some evidence to support this statistic? A reference, a citation, anything? Because this is the kind of garbage knowledge that gets into the conversation. Similar to the well known fact that 40% of all writers make poor use of statistics in their writing.

  • NJEthicsAttorney

    As an adjunct at an Eastern law school since 2006, I have seen the general demeanor of the student body change from one of eagerness about joining the fray to one of trepidation, lack of enthusiasm and increased anxiety about the future. I suspect that many cases of depression would resolve with a brighter employment picture.
    My colleagues tell me about students' attitudes that range from ultra-competitiveness to apparent apathy. I believe the same anxiety which results in depression for students can later drive them to ethics violations as attorneys. Fortunately, the class I teach, (Persuasion and Advocacy), is based on a cooperative, not competitive, model, so I get to see these students at the (rare in law school) moments when they rejoice in their classmates' successes. Still, there is a palpably more somber feeling in our hallowed halls with each passing semester. It is easy to empathize with this generation of students.
    Perhaps this chilling period in the law school scene will help winnow the students who want to be lawyers from the ones who really want to work as lawyers.

  • NJEthicsAttorney

    As an adjunct at an Eastern law school since 2006, I have seen the general demeanor of the student body change from one of eagerness about joining the fray to one of trepidation, lack of enthusiasm and increased anxiety about the future. I suspect that many cases of depression would resolve with a brighter employment picture.
    My colleagues tell me about students' attitudes that range from ultra-competitiveness to apparent apathy. I believe the same anxiety which results in depression for the student, can later drive them to ethics violations as attorneys. Fortunately, my class (Persuasion and Advocacy), is based on a cooperative, not competitive model, so I get to see these students at the (rare in law school) moments when they rejoice in their classmates' success. Still, there is a palpably more somber feeling in our hallowed halls. It is easy to empathize with this generation of students.
    Perhaps this chilling period in the law school scene will help winnow the students who want to be lawyers from the ones who want to work as lawyers.

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