Law schools back University of Texas in affirmative action case

, The National Law Journal

   | 9 Comments

The U.S. Supreme Court will grapple with affirmative action again on October 10 when it hears oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas. Fisher doesn't center on a law school, but the law school community has rallied around the university, filing amicus briefs defending affirmative action in higher education.

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What's being said

  • Roger

    "The simple, demonstrable statistical fact is that most selective law schools in this country will have almost no students of certain races unless they adopt admissions policies designed to alter that outcome." Maybe if minority undergraduate students knew that the color of their skin was not a key to the kingdom, they would elevate their efforts to gain admittance on merit . . .

  • Ken

    I agree with Jackie B. Some type of affirmative action is important to enhance diversity not just to benefit the minority students, but all students will benefit from being in a more diverse environment, more reflective of the real world they will practice in as a lawyer.

  • Roger

    "The simple, demonstrable statistical fact is that most selective law schools in this country will have almost no students of certain races unless they adopt admissions policies designed to alter that outcome." Maybe if minority undergraduate students knew that the color of their skin was not a key to the kingdom, they would elevate their efforts to gain admittance on merit . . .

  • sweetsuzee

    If I were a minority student I would be mortified by the derogatory, demeaning content in these briefs that include things such as "While an admissions plan that relies solely on students' class rank may achieve a semblance of racial diversity at some large public undergraduate universities, this success could not be replicated for law schools" and "If universities throughout the country are forced to abandon race-conscious admission programs, the number of racially diverse undergraduate students will decrease dramatically".



    How insulting; how offensive? However, in this "give-me" mentality of a society we have become, self-pride and self-worth are very hard to come by.

  • CarrieANation

    Growing up as a minority in another culture, I listened carefully to the racial/behavioral stereotypes its people, jokes and traditions saddled us gringos with.

    Then--without losing the good--I made it a project to improve my outlook and attitudes to purposely show that populace their stereotypes were not universal to all gringos.

  • Jackie B

    In 1967, my undergraduate alma mater adopted a policy of admitting students with low SAT scores and low grades on the basis of race, with the proviso that such students were required to initally enroll in and receive acceptable grades in remedial courses that would raise their skills to the same level as students coming from better school districts. It worked! Today we have many accomplished professionals from various races because they got this break! These students need a chance!

  • Brian

    I'm sorry, but such racial preference is racism. Reverse or counter-racism, perhaps, but racism, all the same. I really must question whether race or socioeconomic status is really the driving force, as well. It sounds more like rent-seeking behaviors designed to draw additional govt. funding, rather than any genuine concern for any group's, race's or individual's ultimate good. And I have to ask, what happens to the profession if schools start dumbing down their curriculum in order to maintain a status quo of diversity that is a mere invention designed to make money and grease squeaky wheels? Not to mention the many thousands of more qualified students who worked harder or are just more suited to the high-pressured legal environment who are going to get sold down the academic river, because they aren't the right color. Diversity in itself, for its own sake, is not a true driver of original or creative thinking, it's just a word that means racial preference, without the sticky racism tag. I went to a very, very diverse college for my BA, and it was a joke. It's ALL ABOUT RENT-SEEKING AND HANDOUTS. My bottom line: "don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining, even if you happen to falsely think that calling that rain diversity makes a real difference; because it doesn't."

  • Tom

    I believe the latest quote I can recall with regard to the subject is attributed to Justice Roberts. Purportedly, he said, "the way to end racial discrimination is to end racial discrimination." 'Nuff said.



  • broke small town lawyer

    of course the six figure income scum that run law schools are going to back affirmative action. After all, the civil rights laws were born of the upper class and their greed for lower cost labor and a more divided electorate.

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