OPINION

Common ground on affirmative action

Asian-Americans, like students of other races, benefit from the kind of diversity that enriches their education and prepares them for careers in the global workplace.

, The National Law Journal

   | 2 Comments

Asian-Americans, like students of other races, benefit from the kind of diversity that enriches their education and prepares them for careers in the global workplace.

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What's being said

  • ohareedw

    Going back a number of years, colleges always had a "diversity" aspect to their admissions policy. With the introduction of Affirmative Action, there was a hard and fast "club" to have a specific type of diversity. Unfortunately, the classifications are way too broad. "Black" can mean lots of things: individuals who are Haitian American, Jamaican American, etc. or African American (greater than second generation). And that sub-category has lots of possibilities as background. The specific conversation here is "Asian" (presumably Asian American). However, that background could be Chinese, Japanese, Korean and a myriad of other countries of original origin - all with different cultural perspectives. To put all of these backgrounds into a single bucket does everyone a disservice. I am all for giving the truly disadvantaged a "leg up," but I would want to see true attempts at success prior to the admission rather than just a category.

  • RogerClegg

    1. I see: So it's okay to discriminate against Asians in favor of African Americans and Latinos, but it's not okay to discriminate against Asians in favor of whites. Very principled.

    2. Re: "First, it is imperative that all discrimination against Asian-Americans in educational admissions be eliminated." If African Americans and Latinos are getting racial preferences (as it is admitted they are and as the writers support), then other groups (whites and Asians) ARE being discriminated against. Re: "Second, colleges and universities should take into account the tremendous ethnic ... diversity among Asian-Americans." Wouldn't it be better to ignore the ethnicity of all applicants, Asian and non-Asian alike?

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