ABA seeks help monitoring law graduate employment statistics

, The National Law Journal

   | 3 Comments

The American Bar Association's Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar has put out a request for proposals for a process by which it can better police the postgraduate employment data that law schools release.

This content has been archived. It is available exclusively through our partner LexisNexis®.

To view this content, please continue to Lexis Advance®.

Continue to Lexis Advance®

Not a Lexis Advance® Subscriber? Subscribe Now

Why am I seeing this?

LexisNexis® is now the exclusive third party online distributor of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® customers will be able to access and use ALM's content by subscribing to the LexisNexis® services via Lexis Advance®. This includes content from the National Law Journal®, The American Lawyer®, Law Technology News®, The New York Law Journal® and Corporate Counsel®, as well as ALM's other newspapers, directories, legal treatises, published and unpublished court opinions, and other sources of legal information.

ALM's content plays a significant role in your work and research, and now through this alliance LexisNexis® will bring you access to an even more comprehensive collection of legal content.

For questions call 1-877-256-2472 or contact us at customercare@alm.com

What's being said

  • Jennypops

    I worked in a law school career services office for five years and it was always difficult to track down the data from a certain percentage of our graduates. Some felt that it was none of our business, some were frustrated with the school and thougth that witholding information was a way to flip us the bird, some felt that we had been of no assistance and a fair number just never got around to responding. Our public interest students were often frustrated because their job search tended to last longer than the private sector folks', and they felt that their stats didn't matter. Particularly for students who are not inclined to share their employment information, the law school's only argument is that it may 'help in the rankings' if the graduates report - and many of them could care less.

    I don't understand why the ABA and other organizations expect the law schools to bear sole responsibility for data collection, as if it's simply a lack of will that prevents law school administrators from collecting complete and accurate information. Perhaps a centralized reporting system makes more sense, and perhaps making the reporting part of a bar requirement or getting the ABA to collect the data would lead to better results.

  • jurisdebtor

    "Unlike admissions data, there is no centralized source of law graduate jobs data—which the schools themselves sometimes struggle to compile. So the ABA is seeking guidance from experts. The organization last year adopted more detailed postgraduate jobs reporting requirements, which has complicated the reporting process for law schools and made oversight tougher."

    Fine, I will concede that point, but why is it that we are in 2013, and the ABA is just now looking into correcting this problem? For an organization that has rules about how many hours a law student can work during the summer, one would assume that it would have set up some system to record, track, and possibly investigate employment data--a/k/a, the biggest selling point for law schools.

  • exposing the law school scam

    THE ABA IS CONTROLLED BY THE LAW SCHOOLS. DO NOT FALL FOR THIS PROPAGANDA. THEY ARE AFTER YOUR STUDENT LOANS. THEY WILL RUIN YOUR LIFE IF YOU FALL FOR THIS PROPAGANDA. I KNOW--THEY RUINED MINE.

Comments are not moderated. To report offensive comments, click here.

Preparing comment abuse report for Article #1202589105681

Thank you!

This article's comments will be reviewed.