Opinion

Design: The New Frontier of Intellectual Property

We must move beyond the traditional silos of patents, trademarks and copyrights to a dialogue about how the system as a whole can champion design in the 21st Century.

, The National Law Journal

   | 1 Comments

We must move beyond the traditional silos of patents, trademarks and copyrights to a dialogue about how the system as a whole can champion design in the 21st Century.

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What's being said

  • Charles L Mauro CHFP

    Mr. Kappos:

    Your comments on the increasing importance of design are well directed and correct. Your point that "Design" (capital D) deals with the larger issue of how design impacts the overall success of products is becoming well understood. Support for this point of view comes not only from the field of industrial design but also from recent developments in cognitive science which shows that how things appear is a critical aspect of how such things are categorized and associated with a source of manufacture. The visual Design of products also turns out to communicate a great deal about how they function in real terms.

    The second interesting support for your POV is that recent Apple v. Samsung case which shows that Design, in the larger context, has real asset value for those who wish to protect it. The case also indicates that the current IP protection system probably does not do a great job protecting the overall user experience (UX) of interactive products, as the current system bifurcates form (visual design) from function. In this regard below is a link to an analysis of the impact that the Apple v. Samsung case will have on product design and software development in the future. The piece is written from the point of view of a design professional/design expert and not from the view of an attorney.

    http://www.mauronewmedia.com/blog/apple-v-samsung-implications-for-product-design-user-interface-ux-design-software-development-and-the-future-of-high-technology-consumer-products/

    Charles L Mauro CHFP
    President
    MauroNewMedia
    New York

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