OPINION

Patriotism, Profanity and Principles

Can the FCC really announce a new rule on fleeting expletives via Twitter?

, The National Law Journal

   | 1 Comments

Can the FCC really announce a new rule on fleeting expletives via Twitter?

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Originally appeared in print as Patriotism, Profanity Principles

What's being said

  • Avon

    The professors-authors are right that regulation by "excited utterance" is no solution to the problem of controlling "fleeting expletives." Two wrongs make a whopper of an injustice.

    But let's try to get the story straight. Carlin's monologue was not "Filthy Words" but "Seven Dirty Words (you can't say on television)." The content of the tweet deserves to be somewhere in the first half of the story, or we have no idea what the story is til the end. And isn't it relevant enough to mention that Genachoswki's term ends any minute now anyway, or his track record of prudent judgment as an editor at the Harvard Law Review and a Supreme Court clerk?

    There's more to this story than an imbalanced "high federal official" being in power.

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