, Legal Times

On Capitol Hill, Polarized Reaction to Campaign Contribution Ruling

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Reaction to Wednesday's U.S. Supreme Court decision on campaign contributions was swift and polarized, with Republicans praising the ruling as a victory and Democrats decrying it as a blow to fair elections.

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What's being said

  • Why shouldn‘t successful Americans have more influence over poltics than less successful people? No one who works hard for themselves and their families to get ahead would ever want to live in a country that values the political preferences of, for example, pimps and prostitutes, unwed baby mommas and daddies, or chronically unemployed losers exactly as much as it does those of entrepreneurs, professionals and responsibly married parents.

    If successful, responsible folks -- anywhere along the poltical spectrum -- have the financial capacity to influence our politics more than less successful, irresponsible folks, that‘s a good thing we should all embrace. And for every Charles Koch, there‘s a George Soros. So money in politics is not a problem. Let‘s move on, dot org.

  • Why shouldn‘t successful Americans have more influence over poltics than less successful people? No one who works hard for themselves and their families to get ahead would ever want to live in a country that values the political preferences of, for example, crack whores, unwed mothers or chronically unemployed losers exactly as much as it does those of entrepreneurs, professionals and responsibly married parents.

    If successful, responsible folks -- anywhere along the poltical spectrum -- have the financial capacity to influence our politics more than less successful, irresponsible folks, that‘s a good thing we should all embrace. And for every Charles Koch there‘s a George Soros. So money in politics is not a problem. Let‘s move on.

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