Blind Law School Applicant Loses High Court Case, But Vows Continued Fight

, Supreme Court Brief

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a legally blind man's challenge to what he claims is the discriminatory logic-games portion of the Law School Admission Test. His lawyer said the legal fight will continue.

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  • imaealiman

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  • Dawn

    Yale no longer requires the dumb LSAT, which tests test-taking skills and propensity to think like the group, a test which any real genius would greatly struggle through since it tests political instinct more than it tests logic and, because it has no component for testing neutrality, objectivity, or problem- solving, it is a terrible way to narrow the pool of potential judges. Blind people would arguably, on average, make much better judges than ones selected through the judicial/ political process of selecting only from political-type lawyer/advocates. He should apply to Yale.

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