Rulings

Cat Lamps and Van Gogh’s Shoes Make Cameo Appearance in SCOTUS Ruling

By Tony Mauro |

In its ruling Wednesday in Star Athletica v. Varsity Brands, an important copyright dispute over the design of cheerleader outfits, the U.S. Supreme Court decided words were not enough.

National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C.

Justices' Ruling on 'Acting' Officials Is Silent on Past Labor Decisions

By Tony Mauro |

A National Labor Relations Board dispute has once again become the crucible for a U.S. Supreme Court ruling about the rules for filling vacancies in executive branch positions. By a 6-2 vote, the high court ruled Tuesday that someone serving in an acting capacity in a position subject to Senate approval cannot continue in that position after being nominated by the president to the same job on a permanent basis.

U.S. Supreme Court to Revisit Death Penalty Issues in Texas Cases

The intersection of intellectual disability and race with capital punishment lies at the heart of two appeals that the court on Monday agreed to review next term.

U.S. Supreme Court building.

Supreme Court, Even Without Scalia, Still Favors Property Owners in Environmental Case

By Tony Mauro |

Even without the late Justice Antonin Scalia leading the charge, the U.S. Supreme Court showed on Tuesday it can rein in the administrative state and give property owners new pathways to challenge regulators in court.

Anti-death penalty buttons outside the Supreme Court. June 29, 2015.

John Roberts Knocks Down Prosecution Bias Excuses One by One

By Tony Mauro |

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. on Monday sent a strong message to state courts and prosecutors that racial bias in jury selection is unacceptable.

Paul Smith of Jenner & Block.

Did the Justices Send a Message to the EEOC in a Legal-Fee Case?

By Tony Mauro |

By ruling in favor of awarding legal fees to a company that the government accused of widespread sexual harassment, the U.S. Supreme Court may have been sending a broader message that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission needs to clean up its act.

Pom Wonderful bottles

POM Wonderful Loses Long Fight With FTC Over Deceptive Ads

By Tony Mauro |

The Federal Trade Commission has finally prevailed in a long-running dispute with POM Wonderful over allegedly misleading claims about the health benefits of the company’s pomegranate products.

The crowd chants  during A massive rally in favor of immigration law reform held at the Mall in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 10, 2006.

The Potential 4-4 Split with the Biggest Punch

By Marcia Coyle |

The final high-stakes argument of the U.S. Supreme Court term may have the greatest impact if the court, hobbled by an empty ninth chair, divides 4-4.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

An Unusual Divide Hands Victory to Criminal Defense Bar

By Marcia Coyle |

Prosecutors are barred from freezing criminal defendants’ assets unconnected to their alleged crimes and needed to hire defense counsel of choice, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday in a decision that crossed its liberal-conservative divide.

Scalia's chair and the bench were draped in black after his death on Feb. 13.

The First Post-Scalia Tie is a Win for a Missouri Bank

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday issued the first of what may be several 4-4 tied decisions triggered by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last month.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Alito and Thomas Take Fire at Guns and Grass Decisions

By Marcia Coyle |

Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito Jr. on Monday joined together in criticizing the U.S. Supreme Court’s disposal of two hot-button issues: marijuana and guns.

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justices Samuel Alito, right, and Antonin Scalia, left, after a panel discussion on

Thomas and Alito Follow Scalia's Lead on Juvenile Sentencing Cases

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito Jr. on Monday picked up the mantle of the late Justice Antonin Scalia in advising lower courts on how to cope with a January decision in which all three justices dissented.

The Liberty Mutual Insurance world headquarters building, located in Boston, MA.

High Court Deals Blow to States' Collection of Health Care Data

By Marcia Coyle |

Justice Clarence Thomas has never been shy about questioning settled and not-so-settled areas of the law. On Tuesday, he challenged Congress’ authority to pre-empt—or block—a “wide array” of state laws under the federal law governing employee retirement and benefit plans.

Lesa Curtis of Westchester, N.Y., right, who is pro agency fees and a former president of her union, rallies outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, Jan. 11, 2016, as the court heard arguments in the 'Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association' case.

How 4-4 Splits Will Complicate the Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

Terry Pell knows exactly what he will do if the now eight-member U.S. Supreme Court disposes of his challenge to labor union fees with a 4-4 tie vote.

Energy Agency Hits 'Sweet Spot' in Electricity Regs, High Court Says

By Tony Mauro |

The Obama administration’s regulatory effort to reduce electricity use during times of peak demand won broad support from the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.

John Roberts Jr., left, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, right.

Supreme Court Rules For Class Action Plaintiffs

By Tony Mauro |

So far, so good for the plaintiffs’ bar in the latest batch of class action cases the U.S. Supreme Court is considering this term.

Service members search through rubble on Oct. 23, 1983 after a suicide truck bomb attack on the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon. The blast, the single deadliest attack on U.S. forces abroad since World War II, claimed the lives of 241 American service members.

Congress Can't Tell Courts How to Rule, Roberts Says in Iran Case

By Tony Mauro |

As chief justice, John Roberts Jr. champions the independence of the federal judiciary in speeches and annual reports. On Wednesday, he delivered his "don't mess with the courts" message loud and clear from the bench.

ABA Urges High Court to Take on Seven-Year Work-Product Fight

By Marcia Coyle |

A pharmaceutical company is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to step into a seven-year fight with the Federal Trade Commission over documents related to an antitrust investigation. And the American Bar Association urges the justices to do just that in order to prevent "serious undermining" of lawyers' work-product protection.

Eighth and Sixth Amendments Loom Over Justices' Struggles with Sentencing

By Marcia Coyle |

In a lethal-injection dissent last term, Justice Stephen Breyer's call for reconsideration of the death penalty's constitutionality captured headlines and re-fired the debate, but he sowed the seeds of that June dissent more than a decade ago in a case at the heart of Tuesday's arguments in a challenge to Florida's capital-punishment system.

Will the Justices' Barriers to Class Actions Fall?

By Marcia Coyle |

The Roberts Court’s dislike of class actions and its loyalty—sometimes divided—to arbitration have levied knock-out blows to consumers and small businesses. But a counterpunch may be on the way.

U.S. Supreme Court

Back to Basics on Supreme Court Opening Day—For Now

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

There were no missing pages in the 76-page "orders" list as there were a year ago. There was no rapid hunt through those pages by reporters scanning for a long-anticipated, high-profile issue of the year as there was with same-sex marriage. What a difference a year can make in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ronald Brock, of TruthTruckUsa.com, demonstrating outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the court's final day of the 2014-15 term.

The Quest to Be Seen and Heard Outside the U.S. Supreme Court

By Marcia Coyle |

More than 30 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the First Amend­ment rights of those who sought to demonstrate on the sidewalks around the high court. Could the justices soon confront a First Amendment challenge to the prohibition on demonstrations on their marble plaza?

Study: How Supreme Court Decisions Move Markets

By Tony Mauro |

When the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its first ruling on the Affordable Care Act in 2012, some news outlets reported incorrectly that the law had been struck down.

Court's Career-Criminal Ruling Triggers Sentencing Litigation

By Marcia Coyle |

Immediately after Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. summarized from the bench his dissent in June's same-sex marriage decision, he announced that Justice Antonin Scalia had the court's opinion in the final case of that day—likely the most ignored one of that week.

Rudy Telscher

Attorney Fee Awards Surge After High Court Patent Decision

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court has been arming district court judges with the law they need to weed out bad patent lawsuits, patent litigator Rudy Telscher believes. And one recently won weapon—attorney fee awards—is the result of Telscher's own high court victory.

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. March 4, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

What the Supreme Court’s 2014 Term Means for Business

By Steffen N. Johnson |

June 29 marked the end of a blockbuster term for the U.S. Supreme Court. The court's October 2014 term will long be remembered for high-profile decisions on health care and same-sex marriage. But 2014-15 also brought decisions on a host of vital issues affecting business. Winston & Strawn's Steffen N. Johnson looks at some of the court's "greatest hits" for business in 2014-15—ten cases expected to have a significant effect on the legal environment in which those who do business in the United States operate.

Anti-death penalty activists hold a four day liquid-only fast and vigil to mark the anniversaries of the 1972 <i>Furman</i> and 1976 <i>Gregg</i> Supreme Court decisions involving the death penalty. The vigil, organized by the Abolitionist Action Committee, coincided with court's last public session of the current term when the opinion in <i>Glossip v. Gross</i> was expected to be announced. June 29, 2015.

Positions Harden on High Court over Capital Punishment

By Marcia Coyle |

Twenty-five years have passed since two justices who were unalterably opposed to the death penalty sat on the U.S. Supreme Court together. On Monday, Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg indicated they were ready to step into the shoes of the late William Brennan Jr. and Thurgood Marshall in a controversy over a lethal-injection drug.

Supreme Court Tells EPA To Consider Costs of Pollution Regulations

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has fared well before the U.S. Supreme Court in recent Clean Air Act cases. But the streak ended Monday when the justices ruled that the EPA must consider the cost to industry in regulating mercury emissions from factories and coal plants.

Waiting outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 22, 2015.

Why the Supreme Court Doesn’t Give Advance Notice About Decisions

By Tony Mauro |

When the U.S. Supreme Court returns to the bench Monday, June 29, it will be the last sitting before its summer recess—and the only day of the term when the public can be relatively sure which rulings will be announced.

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments before the court announced its opinion in the same-sex marriage case <i>Obergefell v Hodges</i>.

Marriage Ruling Historic, But Not Final Word on Gay Rights

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's historic decision recognizing same-sex couples' fundamental right to marriage was a major leap, but not the final legal step in ending discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people, legal scholars and other observers said.

Demonstrators in favor of the Obama Administration's Affordable Care Act celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments after the court announced its opinion in the subsidies case King v. Burwell, ruling in favor of the government.

Roberts Leads Court Through Second ACA Storm; More Ahead

By Marcia Coyle |

Twice in the past three years, Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. has steered the high court through the highly political maelstrom surrounding the federal health care law without its rulings being labeled partisan. But new challenges to the law and the court lie ahead.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Justice Kennedy’s Vote Rescues Fair Housing Act

By Tony Mauro |

Civil rights advocates and the Obama administration on Thursday celebrated U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's embrace of the Fair Housing Act in a 5-4 ruling that endorsed the use of "disparate impact" claims in discrimination cases.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Kennedy Joins Liberals in Two Rulings Against Law Enforcement Officials

By Tony Mauro |

With liberal justices in the majority, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled against law enforcement officials in a pair of 5-4 decisions that involved police searches of motel registries and excessive force against jail inmates.

Supreme Court's Spider-Man Ruling Snares 'Garage Inventors'

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling Monday cutting off royalties for the developer of a Spider-Man toy may be a boon to the patent bar, but a blow to "garage inventors" who don't know the intricacies of patent licensing agreements.

Raisins drying on a late summer day in September, in Tulare County, California.

Court: Compensation Due When U.S. Takes Personal Property

By Marcia Coyle |

In a decision favoring a raison grower's claim that the government took his personal property—raisins—without just compensation, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday may have planted the seed of a bigger headache for local governments, environmentalists and others.

Thomas Spars With Kennedy Over Solitary Confinement

By By Marcia Coyle |

An unusual concurrence by Justice Anthony Kennedy in a death penalty habeas decision Thursday triggered an unusually blunt and unsympathetic reply by Justice Clarence Thomas on an issue that was not even part of the case before them: solitary confinement.

Good News Community Church sign.  Photo courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom.

First Amendment Rulings Stir Debate Over License Plates, Signs

By By Tony Mauro |

Befitting the First Amendment, the U.S. Supreme Court's two major free speech decisions issued on Thursday prompted strong and conflicting reaction on both sides in both cases.

Fauzia Din and her husband Kanishka Berashk.

Court: US Owes No Explanation for Denial of Husband's Visa

By By Marcia Coyle |

A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a U.S. citizen's claim that she had a constitutional due process right to know why the government denied a visa to her Afghan husband.

Darius Clark. Credit: Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's Office.

Court: Convicted Abuser Had No Right to Cross-Examine Child

By By Marcia Coyle |

Statements by very young children or to persons other than law enforcement officials will rarely trigger a criminal defendant's right to confront his accuser at trial, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Thomas Spars With Kennedy Over Solitary Confinement

By By Marcia Coyle |

An unusual concurrence by Justice Anthony Kennedy in a death penalty habeas decision Thursday triggered an unusually blunt and unsympathetic reply by Justice Clarence Thomas on an issue that was not even part of the case before them: solitary confinement.

Maryland's 2011 congressional redistricting plan underlies a challenge to the meaning of the 100-year-old Three-Judge Court Act.

Justices Add Class Actions, Redistricting to Docket; Decline Gun Case

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear next fall significant challenges to how workers prove class action damages and how three-judge courts are formed to consider redistricting lawsuits.

Samantha Elauf, center, her mother Majda Elauf, left, and P. David Lopez, General Counsel of the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), leave the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Justices Expand Protections for Religion in Hiring

By Marcia Coyle |

Employers violate the nation's major job-bias law if the need for a religious accommodation was a motivating factor in their refusal to hire someone, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Narrow Facebook Ruling Riles Supreme Court Dissenters

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's long-awaited ruling Monday on the prosecution of Facebook threats turned out to be one of those narrow decisions that Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. has touted as the way to achieve greater unanimity.

High Court Broadens Bankruptcy Judges' Authority

By Marcia Coyle |

Bankruptcy judges may decide controversies in a bankruptcy proceeding that ordinarily would be handled by federal district judges, if the parties consent, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

KBR's headquarters in downtown Houston.

Justices Give Companies Partial Win in Whistleblower Suits

By Marcia Coyle |

Companies doing business with the federal government scored a partial victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in their efforts to defend against whistleblower claims.

Supreme Court Allows Convicted Felons to Sell Their Firearms

By Tony Mauro |

Convicted felons who are barred from possessing firearms under federal law may still sell the guns they already own on the open market, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Attorney John Burris, center, representing Teresa Sheehan, accompanied by fellow attorneys Ben Nisenbaum, right, and Leonard J. Feldman, speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, March 23, 2015, after the court heard arguments in San Francisco v. Sheehan case.

S.F. Police Immune in Arrest, Shooting of Mentally Ill Woman

By Zoe Tillman |

Police officers who shot a mentally ill woman armed with a knife are immune against claims that they failed to accommodate her health issues, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Debtors Can't Appeal Actions on Proposed Repayment Plans

By Marcia Coyle |

A debtor in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding may not immediately appeal the rejection of his proposed repayment plan, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

(l-r) Deepak Gupta of Gupta Beck and Mayer Brown's Andrew Pincus

Justices Take Class Action Over Publication of Personal Information

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday said it would decide next term whether consumers may sue websites and firms that publish inaccurate personal information even if they suffer no injuries.

Coal export terminal.

Employers Win Limited Review of EEOC Settlement Efforts

By Tony Mauro and Marcia Coyle |

In a limited win for employers, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that federal judges can review efforts made by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to conciliate disputes before they go to court.

Bert Brandenburg.

Supreme Court's 'Yulee' Decision: A Turning Point on Judicial Elections?

By Tony Mauro |

Wednesday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding a Florida ban on personal solicitation of campaign money by judicial candidates could bring a sea change to judicial elections—and even a move toward returning to merit selection.

A Supreme Court Win for Plaintiffs Suing the United States

By Tony Mauro |

By loosening the deadlines for litigation against the federal government, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday delivered a significant 5-4 win to plaintiffs including veterans and their families who bring tort claims against the United States.

Court Sets Limits on Dog Sniffs During Traffic Stops

By Marcia Coyle |

Police violate the Fourth Amendment if they extend a lawful traffic stop to conduct a dog sniff for drugs without reasonable suspicion that drugs are present, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

High Court Rejects Human Rights Claims Against Chiquita

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday put an end to litigation against Chiquita Brands International that sought damages for its role in funding a U.S.-designated terrorist group accused of killing more than 4,000 people in Colombia.

Equal Justice Center founder and executive director Bryan Stevenson

Justices Refuse to Examine Overrides of Jury Sentences in Death Cases

By Marcia Coyle |

For the second time in less than two years, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to examine Alabama’s practice of allowing trial judges in capital murder cases to override jury verdicts of life without parole and instead impose death sentences.

2014 Election voting poll in Baltimore, MD.

Court Won't Review N.C. Vote Restrictions, But More to Come

By Marcia Coyle |

For the second time in two weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear arguments over a voter ID law. But no one expects those denials to be the justices' final word on the controversial laws.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

High Court Shuts Door on Suits Over Medicaid Rates

By Marcia Coyle |

Health care providers cannot sue states over Medicaid reimbursement rates that they contend are too low to ensure delivery of services under the federal-state program for poor and low-income individuals, a divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Justices: GPS Monitoring of Sex Offenders Raises Fourth Amendment Concerns

By Tony Mauro |

Requiring a convicted North Carolina sex offender to wear a GPS device on his ankle for the rest of his life amounts to a search that raises Fourth Amendment concerns, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Peggy Young, a Virginia woman who lost her UPS job because she became pregnant, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014.

High Court Raises Burden for Employers on Pregnancy Bias

By Marcia Coyle |

Employers are not required to give pregnant workers the same accommodations that they offer workers with other disabilities, but need to establish a legitimate, nondiscriminatory reason for any difference to avoid liability for pregnancy discrimination, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer

Court Sides With Challenge to Alabama's 'Racial Gerrymander'

By Marcia Coyle |

A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, citing a federal district court's multiple legal errors, directed that court to reconsider its decision upholding Alabama's redistricting plan after it was challenged as an unconstitutional "racial gerrymander."

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan

Supreme Court Restricts Securities Suits that Challenge Company 'Opinions'

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday limited, but did not erase, the liability that companies face when they offer opinions or predictions in securities filings that turn out to be wrong.

Allyson Ho, co-chair of the U.S. Supreme Court and appellate litigation practice at Morgan Lewis and Bockius LLP in Dallas, after her first argument before the high court in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association on Nov. 10, 2014.

A Supreme Court Win for the Administrative State

By Tony Mauro |

In a significant victory for regulators over the wishes of the regulated, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Monday that federal agencies do not need to seek public comment when they change their interpretation of their own rules.

A Supreme Court Victory for Internet Retailers

By Tony Mauro |

With hints of future battles over state taxation of Internet sales, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday handed a technical victory to retailers trying to stave off the tax collector.

Samuel Alito, left, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, right.

Justices Sink Fraud Case Against Fisherman

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling against the federal prosecution of a Florida fisherman under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was hailed Wednesday as a blow against overcriminalization and zealous federal prosecutions.

The French Quarter in New Orleans, La.

Court Passes Up Circuit Split Over Tour Guide Licensing

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court justices say they look for clear splits between federal appeals courts before they grant review of petitions before them. But on Monday, in a case involving New Orleans tour guides, the justices passed up just such a split.

Juvenile Murderers Must Wait for Answer on Sentencing

By Marcia Coyle |

Sentenced to life in prison without parole as a teenager, George Toca was freed from a Louisiana prison on Jan. 29 after nearly 31 years under a special plea deal with prosecutors. His good news was bad news for hundreds of other inmates who were juveniles when given the same sentence.

Oct. 3, 2007 - Rancho Santa Margarita, California, U.S. - Former air marshal RobertT Maclean was fired for blowing the whistle on a TSA cost cutting plan to cut air marshals on the type of long distance flights targeted on 9/11.

High Court Bolsters Whistleblower Protection

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday strengthened legal protections for government whistleblowers in a decision involving a fired federal air marshal.

Death Row Prisoner May Fire Lawyers Who Missed Deadline

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that lower federal courts were wrong to deny a Missouri death row inmate's request for new lawyers after his court-appointed lawyers missed a critical filing deadline.

'Clean Sweep' for Bearded Muslim Inmate Before Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

A Muslim prison inmate from Arkansas on Tuesday won a unanimous victory at the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that a prison regulation barring him from wearing a half-inch beard for religious reasons violated federal law.

Cellphone Companies Score High Court Win on Towers

By Marcia Coyle |

The federal Telecommunications Act requires local governments that deny applications for construction of cellphone towers to give companies written reasons at the same time as notice of the decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

Cellphone Companies Score High Court Win on Towers

By Marcia Coyle |

The federal Telecommunications Act requires local governments that deny applications for construction of cellphone towers to give companies written reasons at the same time as notice of the decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

A Win at the Supreme Court for Consumers in Home Mortgage Case

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of consumers Tuesday, interpreting a federal law to allow homeowners up to three years to give notice to their banks that they want to rescind their mortgage loans.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

A Win at the Supreme Court for Consumers in Home Mortgage Case

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of consumers Tuesday, interpreting a federal law to allow homeowners up to three years to give notice to their banks that they want to rescind their mortgage loans.

Court Coy on Marriage; Rebuffs Political Money Appeals

By Marcia Coyle |

Following a monthlong holiday break, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday added no new cases to the term's argument docket and continued the suspense as to whether it will take up the constitutional question of same-sex marriages.

Court Coy on Marriage; Rebuffs Political Money Appeals

By Marcia Coyle |

Following a monthlong holiday break, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday added no new cases to the term's argument docket and continued the suspense as to whether it will take up the constitutional question of same-sex marriages.

High Court Sides With N.C. Police Officer Who Misunderstood Law

By Marcia Coyle |

Police officers who base searches and seizures on a mistaken understanding of the law do not automatically run afoul of the Fourth Amendment, according to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Monday in a case involving a faulty brake light.

A statue representing women's empowerment stands in front of a Planned Parenthood facility in Tucson, Ariz.

Court Lets Stand Injunction Against Arizona Abortion Limits

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to step into the legal battle over Arizona's law regulating drug-induced abortions.

Justices Ease Class Actions Removal to Federal Court

By Marcia Coyle |

Out-of-state defendants in class actions and other lawsuits do not have to provide evidence supporting their efforts to remove their cases from state court to federal court, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday in a key victory for the business community.

In this Nov. 13, 2002 photo, an Amazon employee packages an order to be shipped from its Coffeyville, Kan., warehouse.

Supreme Court Backs Amazon on No Overtime for Security Screenings

By Tony Mauro |

Companies that require employees to go through security screenings at the end of their workday are not required to pay overtime, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Court: Juror's Voir Dire Lie No Basis to Challenge Verdict

By Marcia Coyle |

Evidence that a juror lied during questioning by lawyers before trial can not be used to support a motion for a new trial, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Court: Juror's Voir Dire Lie No Basis to Challenge Verdict

By Marcia Coyle |

Evidence that a juror lied during questioning by lawyers before trial can not be used to support a motion for a new trial, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Joseph F. Rice of Motley Rice

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Appeal of Oil Spill Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday eliminated what could have been a major roadblock in the multibillion-dollar settlement reached in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill four years ago.

Joseph F. Rice of Motley Rice

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Appeal of Oil Spill Settlement

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday eliminated what could have been a major roadblock in the multibillion-dollar settlement reached in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill four years ago.

Court: Limit on Closing Argument Didn’t Require New Trial

By Marcia Coyle |

A federal appellate court was wrong to conclude that a trial judge's improper restriction of a criminal defense lawyer's closing arguments requires automatic reversal of a conviction, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Trial exhibits of the Carmans' house that were included in the Third Circuit's ruling in Carman v. Carroll.

No Rule Bars Police Knock on Back Door, High Court Says

By Marcia Coyle |

There is no constitutional rule requiring that, when police knock and announce their presence at a residence, they must begin at the front door, the U.S. Supreme Court held on Monday.

Trial exhibits of the Carmans' house that were included in the Third Circuit's ruling in Carman v. Carroll.

No Rule Bars Police Knock on Back Door, High Court Says

By Marcia Coyle |

There is no constitutional rule requiring that, when police knock and announce their presence at a residence, they must begin at the front door, the U.S. Supreme Court held on Monday.

Kannon Shanmugam of Williams & Connolly.

Supreme Court Rejects SG's Plan for Argument Time in Securities Case

By Tony Mauro |

Parties in U.S. Supreme Court litigation usually vie to have the federal government argue on their side. But in a case set for argument next month, the petitioner asked the court not to give the solicitor general’s office any of its half hour, and the court agreed.

Supreme Court's Silence on Marriage Rights Speaks Volumes

By Marcia Coyle |

By declining to take up any of the same-sex marriage cases pending before it on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court defied the conventional wisdom that it finally would resolve the debate over the constitutionality of state bans on those marriages.

Supreme Court's Silence on Marriage Rights Speaks Volumes

By Marcia Coyle |

By declining to take up any of the same-sex marriage cases pending before it on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court defied the conventional wisdom that it finally would resolve the debate over the constitutionality of state bans on those marriages.

Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City hears oral argument in ACLU v. Clapper.

Column: Supreme Court Goes Highbrow to Oppose Broadcasting Hearings

By Gabe Roth |

Returning to work this week, high court justices should take a page from the Second Circuit and televise.

Jonathan Adler of Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

Eyes on Sixth Circuit for Next Move on Same-Sex Marriage

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to sweep same-sex marriage cases off its docket Monday is intensifying the spotlight on six marriage cases pending before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Voters wait hours in long lines to cast their early vote at the Summit County Board of Elections on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Akron, Ohio.

Vote-Restriction Laws Line Up for Supreme Court Review

By Marcia Coyle |

When a divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday allowed Ohio to curtail early voting, the case represented the first of several that the justices likely will face this year in what advocates call the greatest national struggle over voting rights in decades.

Occupy protesters gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court on January 20, 2012. The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday heard argument over the constitutionality of a law that restricts certain expressive activity outside the high court.

D.C. Circuit Weighs Ban On High Court Protests

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court returns to the bench Oct. 6 for a new term that may generate protests outside its iconic building on issues ranging from same-sex marriage to the Affordable Care Act. But it is almost certain that those demonstrations will be confined, as usual, to the public sidewalk in front of the court.

Feds Ordered to Pay Costs in Landmark EPA Case

By Tony Mauro |

Debate continues over which side really won the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling on greenhouse gases issued on June 23. But court clerk Scott Harris has made his own judgment, of sorts; it was a half-win for each side.

Stanford Law School's Mark Lemley

'Alice Corp.' Is Already Making its Mark on Patent Law

By Tony Mauro |

Less than a month after the Supreme Court issued its much-debated Alice Corp. ruling on patent eligibility for abstract ideas, the decision is already making a mark on patent litigation and claims.

Stanford Law School's Mark Lemley

'Alice Corp.' Is Already Making its Mark on Patent Law

By Tony Mauro |

Less than a month after the Supreme Court issued its much-debated Alice Corp. ruling on patent eligibility for abstract ideas, the decision is already making a mark on patent litigation and claims.

Greenhouse Gas Ruling Gives EPA Leeway to Regulate

By Marcia Coyle |

Five years ago, environmentalists endured their worst term in decades, suffering a stunning 0-5 outcome in the U.S. Supreme Court. This term, they are 2-1 and victorious on the most pressing of their issues: greenhouse gas pollutants.

Greenhouse Gas Ruling Gives EPA Leeway to Regulate

By Marcia Coyle |

Five years ago, environmentalists endured their worst term in decades, suffering a stunning 0-5 outcome in the U.S. Supreme Court. This term, they are 2-1 and victorious on the most pressing of their issues: greenhouse gas pollutants.

Mark Perry of Gibson Dunn

Patent Ruling's Effect on 'Trolls' Debated

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's much anticipated ruling Thursday in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International may prove to be a turning point in the corporate world's battle against patent trolls.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito

Supreme Court Limits, But Doesn't End Union Fees

By Tony Mauro |

The ability of public employee unions to charge non-members for their share of the costs of collective bargaining remains intact after a U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday that labor leaders feared would be a "kill shot" for their movement.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito

Supreme Court Limits, But Doesn't End Union Fees

By Tony Mauro |

The ability of public employee unions to charge non-members for their share of the costs of collective bargaining remains intact after a U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday that labor leaders feared would be a "kill shot" for their movement.

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court, on the day the Court issued its decision in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby case

Hobby Lobby Prevails in Challenge to Contraception Mandate

By Marcia Coyle |

In ruling Monday on corporations' religious freedom and the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive insurance requirement, a narrow U.S. Supreme Court majority insisted its decision was limited to closely held corporations.

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court, on the day the Court issued its decision in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby case

Hobby Lobby Prevails in Challenge to Contraception Mandate

By Marcia Coyle |

In ruling Monday on corporations' religious freedom and the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive insurance requirement, a narrow U.S. Supreme Court majority insisted its decision was limited to closely held corporations.

Alan Butler of Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)

Google Rebuffed in Challenge Over Wiretap Class Action

By Jimmy Hoover |

Google on Monday lost its bid to convince the U.S. Supreme Court to review a ruling that permits wiretap claims against the company to move forward.

Abortion Buffer Zone Ruling Leaves Key Precedent Intact

By Marcia Coyle |

Dissenting Supreme Court justices often say they write for the future. For three justices who bitterly dissented 14 years ago in a decision upholding a Colorado abortion clinic buffer zone, the future arrived almost, but not quite, on Thursday.

Abortion Buffer Zone Ruling Leaves Key Precedent Intact

By Marcia Coyle |

Dissenting Supreme Court justices often say they write for the future. For three justices who bitterly dissented 14 years ago in a decision upholding a Colorado abortion clinic buffer zone, the future arrived almost, but not quite, on Thursday.

President Barack Obama

High Court Limits Presidential Power, Triggers Turmoil at NLRB

By Tony Mauro |

A major separation-of-powers decision by the U.S. Supreme Court may prevent President Barack Obama from making recess appointments for the rest of his tenure, and will trigger uncertainty for months or years to come at the National Labor Relations Board.

President Barack Obama

High Court Limits Presidential Power, Triggers Turmoil at NLRB

By Tony Mauro |

A major separation-of-powers decision by the U.S. Supreme Court may prevent President Barack Obama from making recess appointments for the rest of his tenure, and will trigger uncertainty for months or years to come at the National Labor Relations Board.

Supreme Court Tells Police 'Get A Warrant' For Phone Searches

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision protecting cellphone privacy sent a strong signal on Wednesday that the admittedly low-tech justices grasp the profound changes that the Information Age has wrought.

Supreme Court Tells Police 'Get A Warrant' For Phone Searches

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision protecting cellphone privacy sent a strong signal on Wednesday that the admittedly low-tech justices grasp the profound changes that the Information Age has wrought.

Aereo television streaming

Reach of Supreme Court's 'Aereo' Ruling Seen as Limited

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision on Wednesday handing a major copyright victory to network broadcast companies over the upstart Aereo streaming service was widely seen as narrow and unlikely to stifle new technologies.

Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court John Roberts Jr.

Halliburton Ruling Aids Both Sides in Securities Litigation

By Tony Mauro |

The battlefield of securities class actions shifted on Monday, with the U.S. Supreme Court giving both plaintiffs and defendants weapons to deploy in what may be an even more intense and costly level of warfare in the future.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Justices: Foreign Nation's Assets Subject to Discovery

By Marcia Coyle |

Federal courts can order foreign sovereigns, such as Argentina, to produce information about their worldwide assets so that creditors can collect on court-ordered judgments, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Justices Side With Worker Fired for Exposing Corruption

By Marcia Coyle |

Eight years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court created a legal minefield for public employees seeking First Amendment protection from employer retaliation for their speech. This week, the justices cleared some of the debris, but still left millions — from police to academics — wondering whether they are protected.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Justices Side With Worker Fired for Exposing Corruption

By Marcia Coyle |

Eight years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court created a legal minefield for public employees seeking First Amendment protection from employer retaliation for their speech. This week, the justices cleared some of the debris, but still left millions — from police to academics — wondering whether they are protected.

Supreme Court Closes Safe Harbor in False-Advertising Wars

By Marcia Coyle |

Food and beverage companies and others would be wise to take a long, hard look at their product labels in light of a U.S. Supreme Court decision clearing the way for competitors to allege those labels are false or misleading.

Supreme Court Closes Safe Harbor in False-Advertising Wars

By Marcia Coyle |

Food and beverage companies and others would be wise to take a long, hard look at their product labels in light of a U.S. Supreme Court decision clearing the way for competitors to allege those labels are false or misleading.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan

Kagan's 'Unique' Writing Style on Display in Visa Case

By Tony Mauro |

Elena Kagan the U.S. Supreme Court justice donned her hat as Kagan the law teacher Monday as she sorted out the meaning of one of the densest statutory schemes the court has had to rule on in years.

Sidley Austin's Peter Keisler

In Air Pollution Class Action, Justices Decline Industry Push For Review

By Tony Mauro |

Despite an urgent plea from a united front of business advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court last week declined to review a case that could have put an end to state common-law litigation against companies for excess air pollution.

U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts Jr.

Justices: Chemicals Treaty Doesn't Reach Avenging Wife

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, sidestepping a major constitutional test of Congress' treaty powers, ruled unanimously Monday that a vengeful act by a woman whose husband impregnated her best friend did not violate a federal law implementing a chemical-weapons treaty.

U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts Jr.

Justices: Chemicals Treaty Doesn't Reach Avenging Wife

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, sidestepping a major constitutional test of Congress' treaty powers, ruled unanimously Monday that a vengeful act by a woman whose husband impregnated her best friend did not violate a federal law implementing a chemical-weapons treaty.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Federal Circuit Reversed—Yet Again—In Patent Cases

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday unanimously slapped down the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, rejecting two of its patent rulings just over a month after hearing oral arguments in both cases.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Federal Circuit Reversed—Yet Again—In Patent Cases

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday unanimously slapped down the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, rejecting two of its patent rulings just over a month after hearing oral arguments in both cases.

Protesters in Jacksonville, Oregon, where President George W. Bush was scheduled to spend the night in 2004 while campaigning for a second term.

Court Shields Agents Against Constitutional Claims

By Tony Mauro |

In a pair of rulings issued on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court gave wide leeway to law enforcement officials whose actions trigger lawsuits claiming violations of someone’s constitutional rights.

Protesters in Jacksonville, Oregon, where President George W. Bush was scheduled to spend the night in 2004 while campaigning for a second term.

Court Shields Agents Against Constitutional Claims

By Tony Mauro |

In a pair of rulings issued on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court gave wide leeway to law enforcement officials whose actions trigger lawsuits claiming violations of someone’s constitutional rights.

Florida Supreme Court.

Justices Reject Florida's IQ Test for Death Penalty

By Marcia Coyle |

States violate the U.S. Constitution if they use only an IQ score as a bright-line test to determine who is ineligible for the death penalty on ground of intellectually disability, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Florida Supreme Court.

Justices Reject Florida's IQ Test for Death Penalty

By Marcia Coyle |

States violate the U.S. Constitution if they use only an IQ score as a bright-line test to determine who is ineligible for the death penalty on ground of intellectually disability, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Robert DeNiro and Jake LaMotta

Supreme Court Sends 'Raging Bull' Back in the Ring

By Marcia Coyle |

Authors and other creators of copyrighted works scored a major victory Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court eliminated a significant barrier to recovering damages for copyright infringement.

Robert DeNiro and Jake LaMotta

Supreme Court Sends 'Raging Bull' Back in the Ring

By Marcia Coyle |

Authors and other creators of copyrighted works scored a major victory Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court eliminated a significant barrier to recovering damages for copyright infringement.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Divided Court Blesses Prayer At Public Meetings

By Marcia Coyle |

Local governments struggling with whether their common practice of opening meetings with prayer crosses a constitutional line should breathe much easier following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Monday.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Divided Court Blesses Prayer At Public Meetings

By Marcia Coyle |

Local governments struggling with whether their common practice of opening meetings with prayer crosses a constitutional line should breathe much easier following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Monday.

Justices Decline to Rule on Carrying Concealed Guns in Public

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Monday to pass up a case testing the right to bear arms outside the home was yet another sign the justices are done interpreting the Second Amendment for awhile.

Justices Decline to Rule on Carrying Concealed Guns in Public

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Monday to pass up a case testing the right to bear arms outside the home was yet another sign the justices are done interpreting the Second Amendment for awhile.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Justices Make it Easier to Recover Patent Defense Fees

By Marcia Coyle |

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court, in a warning shot to those who bring frivolous patent infringement suits, on Tuesday eased the standard for awarding attorney fees in patent cases.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Justices Make it Easier to Recover Patent Defense Fees

By Marcia Coyle |

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court, in a warning shot to those who bring frivolous patent infringement suits, on Tuesday eased the standard for awarding attorney fees in patent cases.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Supreme Court Upholds EPA's Interstate Pollution Controls

By Marcia Coyle |

Despite bitter opposition from some state and local governments and industry and labor groups, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's plan for dealing with power plant air pollution that drifts from upwind states to downwind states, causing harm and thwarting their ability to meet air quality standards.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Supreme Court Upholds EPA's Interstate Pollution Controls

By Marcia Coyle |

Despite bitter opposition from some state and local governments and industry and labor groups, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's plan for dealing with power plant air pollution that drifts from upwind states to downwind states, causing harm and thwarting their ability to meet air quality standards.

Roy Englert of Robbins, Russell, Englert, Orseck, Untereiner & Sauber

Opinion: There's a Time for Appeals to Moral Vision With Justices

By Roy T. Englert, Jr. |

Borrowing his lyrics from the Book of Ecclesiastes, Pete Seeger wrote a song during the 1950s saying that "to every thing there is a season." That is no less true of U.S. Supreme Court advocacy than of any other subject. There is a time to moralize. But at times it’s better to do something else.

Roy Englert of Robbins, Russell, Englert, Orseck, Untereiner & Sauber

Opinion: There's a Time for Appeals to Moral Vision With Justices

By Roy T. Englert, Jr. |

Borrowing his lyrics from the Book of Ecclesiastes, Pete Seeger wrote a song during the 1950s saying that "to every thing there is a season." That is no less true of U.S. Supreme Court advocacy than of any other subject. There is a time to moralize. But at times it’s better to do something else.

John Roberts Jr., Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

Justices Limit Restitution for Child Pornography Victims

By Marcia Coyle |

A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday limited the amount of restitution due to child pornography victims whose images are viewed by thousands over the Internet.

John Roberts Jr., Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

Justices Limit Restitution for Child Pornography Victims

By Marcia Coyle |

A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday limited the amount of restitution due to child pornography victims whose images are viewed by thousands over the Internet.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Court Upholds Voter-Approved Affirmative Action Ban

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, delivering its second major blow in less than a year to civil rights organizations, on Tuesday upheld Michigan’s voter-approved ban on the use of race preferences in admissions at the state's public universities.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Court Upholds Voter-Approved Affirmative Action Ban

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, delivering its second major blow in less than a year to civil rights organizations, on Tuesday upheld Michigan’s voter-approved ban on the use of race preferences in admissions at the state's public universities.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Divided Court Strikes Total Limits on Campaign Contributions

By Marcia Coyle |

In another major blow to the regulation of money in elections, a sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down federal limits on the total amounts individuals may contribute to candidates and political committees.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Divided Court Strikes Total Limits on Campaign Contributions

By Marcia Coyle |

In another major blow to the regulation of money in elections, a sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down federal limits on the total amounts individuals may contribute to candidates and political committees.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Campaign Reform Advocates, Opponents Clash After McCutcheon Ruling

By Tony Mauro |

Campaign reform advocates reacted angrily Wednesday to the U.S. Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision, attacking the justices for coming close to dismantling the long-standing legal structure for limiting the influence of money in political campaigns.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Campaign Reform Advocates, Opponents Clash After McCutcheon Ruling

By Tony Mauro |

Campaign reform advocates reacted angrily Wednesday to the U.S. Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision, attacking the justices for coming close to dismantling the long-standing legal structure for limiting the influence of money in political campaigns.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Divided Court Strikes Total Limits on Campaign Contributions

By Marcia Coyle |

In another major blow to the regulation of money in elections, a sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down federal limits on the total amounts that individuals may contribute to candidates and political committees.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in response to the court's ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC

Divided Court Strikes Total Limits on Campaign Contributions

By Marcia Coyle |

In another major blow to the regulation of money in elections, a sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down federal limits on the total amounts that individuals may contribute to candidates and political committees.

American Freedom Law Center's Robert Muise

Justices Demur From Religious Groups' Challenge to ACA

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to leap ahead of a lower appellate court in two challenges by religious nonprofit organizations to the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive coverage requirement.

American Freedom Law Center's Robert Muise

Justices Demur From Religious Groups' Challenge to ACA

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to leap ahead of a lower appellate court in two challenges by religious nonprofit organizations to the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive coverage requirement.

Jonathan Lowy, director of the Legal Action Project at the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence.

Court: Domestic Violence Offenders Lose Gun Rights

By Marcia Coyle |

Domestic violence organizations and law enforcement scored a significant victory on Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court, in one of two closely-watched gun regulation cases this term, broadly interpreted the meaning of "physical force" to bar gun possession by those committing acts of domestic violence.

Jonathan Lowy, director of the Legal Action Project at the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence.

Court: Domestic Violence Offenders Lose Gun Rights

By Marcia Coyle |

Domestic violence organizations and law enforcement scored a significant victory on Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court, in one of two closely-watched gun regulation cases this term, broadly interpreted the meaning of "physical force" to bar gun possession by those committing acts of domestic violence.

Lexmark T644 laser printer

Court Opens Lanham Claims to Non-Direct Competitors

By Tony Mauro |

Businesses can invoke the Lanham Act in suing other companies for false advertising, even if they are not direct competitors, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Tuesday.

Lexmark T644 laser printer

Court Opens Lanham Claims to Non-Direct Competitors

By Tony Mauro |

Businesses can invoke the Lanham Act in suing other companies for false advertising, even if they are not direct competitors, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Tuesday.

Ruling Could Drive Stake Through Heart of Rails-to-Trails

By Marcia Coyle |

In a potentially costly setback to the federal government's rails-to-trails program, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that under an 1875 law, abandoned railroad rights of way belong, not to the government, but to the private parties that acquired the underlying lands.

Ruling Could Drive Stake Through Heart of Rails-to-Trails

By Marcia Coyle |

In a potentially costly setback to the federal government's rails-to-trails program, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that under an 1875 law, abandoned railroad rights of way belong, not to the government, but to the private parties that acquired the underlying lands.

George Washington University Law School associate dean Alan Morrison

The Door to Specific Jurisdiction Narrows Again

By Alan B. Morrison |

On Feb. 25, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded its trilogy of cases this term in which the defendant argued that the plaintiff had sued in the wrong forum. The combined result of these cases is that plaintiffs will have fewer choices of where to sue, mainly because it became harder to sue where the plaintiffs live.

George Washington University Law School associate dean Alan Morrison

The Door to Specific Jurisdiction Narrows Again

By Alan B. Morrison |

On Feb. 25, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded its trilogy of cases this term in which the defendant argued that the plaintiff had sued in the wrong forum. The combined result of these cases is that plaintiffs will have fewer choices of where to sue, mainly because it became harder to sue where the plaintiffs live.

Goldstein & Russell's Thomas Goldstein

Justices OK Suits Against Law Firms in Ponzi Scheme

By Marcia Coyle |

Private investors burned in Allen Stanford's $7 billion Ponzi scheme can move ahead with their state-law class actions against two prominent law firms and insurance brokers, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

Goldstein & Russell's Thomas Goldstein

Justices OK Suits Against Law Firms in Ponzi Scheme

By Marcia Coyle |

Private investors burned in Allen Stanford's $7 billion Ponzi scheme can move ahead with their state-law class actions against two prominent law firms and insurance brokers, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

Kohn, Kohn & Colapinto's Stephen Kohn

Justices Expand Corporate Whistleblower Protection

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday significantly expanded legal protection for corporate whistleblowers, making it clear for the first time that thousands of workers in the mutual-fund industry and other private companies are protected from retaliation for reporting fraud.

Kohn, Kohn & Colapinto's Stephen Kohn

Justices Expand Corporate Whistleblower Protection

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday significantly expanded legal protection for corporate whistleblowers, making it clear for the first time that thousands of workers in the mutual-fund industry and other private companies are protected from retaliation for reporting fraud.

Cravath, Swaine & Moore's Lauren Moskowitz

Court Sides With Abducting Parent on Child's Return

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, increasingly drawn into disputes over international child abductions, ruled on Wednesday that a treaty's one-year period to demand return of a child cannot be extended because the abducting parent concealed the child's location.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan

Justices Say No Challenges to Grand Juries on Frozen Assets

By Marcia Coyle |

An indicted criminal defendant has no constitutional right to challenge the government's pretrial freezing of assets needed to hire a lawyer, a divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan

Justices Say No Challenges to Grand Juries on Frozen Assets

By Marcia Coyle |

An indicted criminal defendant has no constitutional right to challenge the government's pretrial freezing of assets needed to hire a lawyer, a divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Stanford law professor Jeffrey Fisher

Warrantless Police Search Permitted Over Tenant's Objection, High Court Says

By Tony Mauro |

Police may search an apartment without a warrant when one tenant gives the OK, even if another tenant who is on the premises objects, but then is arrested and removed, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Stanford law professor Jeffrey Fisher

Warrantless Police Search Permitted Over Tenant's Objection, High Court Says

By Tony Mauro |

Police may search an apartment without a warrant when one tenant gives the OK, even if another tenant who is on the premises objects, but then is arrested and removed, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

The U.S. Supreme Court building

Justices: Trial Lawyer, Judge Didn't Research Key Legal Point

By Marcia Coyle |

A man on Alabama's death row for 28 years won a new opportunity to show that his trial lawyer was ineffective on Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that both the lawyer and the trial judge misunderstood a point of law fundamental to his case.

The U.S. Supreme Court building

Justices: Trial Lawyer, Judge Didn't Research Key Legal Point

By Marcia Coyle |

A man on Alabama's death row for 28 years won a new opportunity to show that his trial lawyer was ineffective on Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that both the lawyer and the trial judge misunderstood a point of law fundamental to his case.

guns

Supreme Court Spurns NRA, Lets Gun Restrictions Stand

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to re-enter Second Amendment gun controversies when it turned away two challenges brought by the National Rifle Association.

guns

Supreme Court Spurns NRA, Lets Gun Restrictions Stand

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to re-enter Second Amendment gun controversies when it turned away two challenges brought by the National Rifle Association.

U.S. Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia

Justices Deliver Major Rulings in Drug, Workplace Cases

By Tony Mauro |

Before heading off for a long winter recess, the Supreme Court on Monday issued a major decision that could affect prosecutions when a crime victim dies of multiple causes.

U.S. Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia

Justices Deliver Major Rulings in Drug, Workplace Cases

By Tony Mauro |

Before heading off for a long winter recess, the Supreme Court on Monday issued a major decision that could affect prosecutions when a crime victim dies of multiple causes.

air wisconsin

Court: Airlines Enjoy Broad Immunity for Threat Reports

By Marcia Coyle |

Federal law gives airlines and their employees broad immunity from civil lawsuits when they alert transportation authorities to potential threats, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday as it reversed a $1.4 million defamation verdict against an airline that reported a pilot was "mentally unstable."

air wisconsin

Court: Airlines Enjoy Broad Immunity for Threat Reports

By Marcia Coyle |

Federal law gives airlines and their employees broad immunity from civil lawsuits when they alert transportation authorities to potential threats, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday as it reversed a $1.4 million defamation verdict against an airline that reported a pilot was "mentally unstable."

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr's Seth Waxman

Justices Lift 'Burden of Proof' From Medical Device Company

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled unanimously in favor of the medical device company Medtronic Inc. in a patent dispute over who has the burden of proof in certain infringement lawsuits.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

State AGs Win Right to Sue Corporations in State Court

By Marcia Coyle |

State attorneys general who have been aggressively pursuing companies for alleged violations of their antitrust and consumer protection laws scored a major victory on Tuesday when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that their lawsuits belong in state, not federal, courts.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

State AGs Win Right to Sue Corporations in State Court

By Marcia Coyle |

State attorneys general who have been aggressively pursuing companies for alleged violations of their antitrust and consumer protection laws scored a major victory on Tuesday when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that their lawsuits belong in state, not federal, courts.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justices Shield Multinational Companies in Dirty War Case

By Marcia Coyle |

In a case arising out of Argentina's "Dirty War," the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday significantly limited the general jurisdiction of federal courts over injured victims' lawsuits against corporations doing business in the United States.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justices Shield Multinational Companies in Dirty War Case

By Marcia Coyle |

In a case arising out of Argentina's "Dirty War," the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday significantly limited the general jurisdiction of federal courts over injured victims' lawsuits against corporations doing business in the United States.

Anti-abortion rally organized on the 35th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

Justices Decline to Hear Arizona Abortion Law

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a hotly disputed Arizona law restricting abortions, signaling that the justices may not be in a hurry to scrutinize the latest wave of state laws limiting the medical procedure.

Anti-abortion rally organized on the 35th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

Justices Decline to Hear Arizona Abortion Law

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a hotly disputed Arizona law restricting abortions, signaling that the justices may not be in a hurry to scrutinize the latest wave of state laws limiting the medical procedure.

High Court Sidesteps Final Decision in Union Challenge

By Marcia Coyle |

A major challenge involving neutrality agreements between employers and unions fizzled in the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

High Court Sidesteps Final Decision in Union Challenge

By Marcia Coyle |

A major challenge involving neutrality agreements between employers and unions fizzled in the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Fireworks Expected at High Court

By Marcia Coyle |

As the U.S. Supreme Court begins a monthlong holiday recess, court watchers await the unwrapping of decisions in some of the term's hot-button cases.

Fireworks Expected at High Court

By Marcia Coyle |

As the U.S. Supreme Court begins a monthlong holiday recess, court watchers await the unwrapping of decisions in some of the term's hot-button cases.

Use of Race in Peremptory Challenges Before Justices

By Marcia Coyle |

In the 102 cases during the past 20 years in which the California Supreme Court reviewed a claim that prosecutors struck prospective jurors on the basis of their race, that court found error only once—and that was 12 years ago. That "improbable record," California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu has observed, was attributable, at least in part, to his court's "erroneous legal framework" for evaluating so-called Batson claims.

Use of Race in Peremptory Challenges Before Justices

By Marcia Coyle |

In the 102 cases during the past 20 years in which the California Supreme Court reviewed a claim that prosecutors struck prospective jurors on the basis of their race, that court found error only once—and that was 12 years ago. That "improbable record," California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu has observed, was attributable, at least in part, to his court's "erroneous legal framework" for evaluating so-called Batson claims.

Case Tests Limits of Child-Abduction Treaty

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday waded into the emotionally weighted arena of international child abductions in a battle between Columbian parents of a little girl now living in the United States.

Case Tests Limits of Child-Abduction Treaty

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday waded into the emotionally weighted arena of international child abductions in a battle between Columbian parents of a little girl now living in the United States.

Justices Give Prosecutors Win in Kansas Death Case

By Tony Mauro |

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that prosecutors may use evidence from a court-ordered mental evaluation against a capital defendant to rebut the defendant's own psychiatric testimony.

Justices Give Prosecutors Win in Kansas Death Case

By Tony Mauro |

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that prosecutors may use evidence from a court-ordered mental evaluation against a capital defendant to rebut the defendant's own psychiatric testimony.

After Supreme Court Win, Voting Rights Act Challengers Seek Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Following a bitter legal battle before the U.S. Supreme Court over the scope of the Voting Rights Act, the challengers are again fighting the federal government — this time over legal fees.

After Supreme Court Win, Voting Rights Act Challengers Seek Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Following a bitter legal battle before the U.S. Supreme Court over the scope of the Voting Rights Act, the challengers are again fighting the federal government — this time over legal fees.

Aereo Asks Justices to Settle Fight With Broadcasters

By Tony Mauro |

In an unusual move that raised the stakes in a major copyright battle between broadcast television networks and the upstart Aereo service, Aereo Inc. on Thursday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve the dispute, even though it won in the court below.