Eric Holder: No Apologies for Return to Big Law

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. said Friday "I am not ashamed" to have returned to private practice after resigning last year, asserting he will continue to advance the justice reform issues he espoused in office as a private attorney. "You can be a public interest lawyer wherever you are," Holder told students at Georgetown University Law Center at a public discussion with National Public Radio's Michel Martin. "I hope you will be a public interest lawyer wherever you are."

Special Reports

Chief Judge Merrick Garland, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, enters the Rose Garden, moments before President Barack Obama announces his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. March 16, 2016.
Supreme Court Showdown: The Nomination of Merrick Garland

Legal Times

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  • Eric Holder: No Apologies for Return to Big Law

    By Tony Mauro

    Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. said Friday "I am not ashamed" to have returned to private practice after resigning last year, asserting he will continue to advance the justice reform issues he espoused in office as a private attorney. "You can be a public interest lawyer wherever you are," Holder told students at Georgetown University Law Center at a public discussion with National Public Radio's Michel Martin. "I hope you will be a public interest lawyer wherever you are."

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Regulation

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Litigation

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