D.C. Circuit Weighs Ban On High Court Protests

The U.S. Supreme Court returns to the bench Oct. 6 for a new term that may generate protests outside its iconic building on issues ranging from same-sex marriage to the Affordable Care Act. But it is almost certain that those demonstrations will be confined, as usual, to the public sidewalk in front of the court.

Practice

  • Orrick Hires Five Former Supreme Court Clerks

    By Marcia Coyle

    Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe has lured three U.S. Supreme Court clerks fresh out of the marble palace and two more veteran high court clerks to a swiftly growing Supreme Court and appellate practice.

  • NAACP LDF Hires Sidley Lawyer for Supreme Court Advocacy

    By Tony Mauro

    John Paul Schnapper-Casteras remembers hearing talk at the dinner table about the U.S. Supreme Court when he was growing up in Seattle. Now 31, Schnapper-Casteras has taken on a position in Washington where the court will be a major part of his workday conversation.

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Briefs & Arguments

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Rulings

  • Feds Ordered to Pay Costs in Landmark EPA Case

    By Tony Mauro

    Debate continues over which side really won the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling on greenhouse gases issued on June 23. But court clerk Scott Harris has made his own judgment, of sorts; it was a half-win for each side.

  • 'Alice Corp.' Is Already Making its Mark on Patent Law

    By Tony Mauro

    Less than a month after the Supreme Court issued its much-debated Alice Corp. ruling on patent eligibility for abstract ideas, the decision is already making a mark on patent litigation and claims.

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Courtside

  • Roberts on Brief-Writing: 'Be Concise'

    By Tony Mauro

    A warning to lawyers who are drafting U.S. Supreme Court briefs this fall: Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. would like you to take a red pencil and lop off 15 pages of verbiage.

  • Countering Scalia on Interpreting Laws, Katzmann's Book Packs Punch

    By Tony Mauro

    Federal appeals judge Robert Katzmann’s new book, a counter-punch to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s views on how to interpret statutes, has attracted the attention of at least some of Scalia’s colleagues on the high court.

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