Justices' Summer Travels So Far Without Fanfare

With the latest U.S. Supreme Court term receding into history, the nine justices have scattered across the globe—but they are flying under the radar, so far.

Practice

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Briefs & Arguments

  • Illinois Informs Justices They Ruled in a Moot Case

    By Marcia Coyle

    Few lawyers beat the high odds against the grant of a petition for rehearing by the U.S. Supreme Court. But the state of Illinois, the losing party in a decision last May, is asking the high court to throw out that ruling in a rare and classic case of, well, oops.

  • Attorney Sees Fatal Flaw in Tax Court's Authority

    By Marcia Coyle

    The U.S. Tax Court has existed in various forms since 1924. But its most recent incarnation, now more than 40 years old, contains a serious constitutional flaw that causes its judges to be biased against taxpayers, some taxpayers and tax scholars contend.

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Rulings

  • 'Alice Corp.' Is Already Making its Mark on Patent Law

    By Tony Mauro

    Less than a month after the Supreme Court issued its much-debated Alice Corp. ruling on patent eligibility for abstract ideas, the decision is already making a mark on patent litigation and claims.

  • Supreme Court Limits, But Doesn't End Union Fees

    By Tony Mauro

    The ability of public employee unions to charge non-members for their share of the costs of collective bargaining remains intact after a U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday that labor leaders feared would be a "kill shot" for their movement.

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Courtside

  • Did You Hear the One About the Appellate Lawyer?

    By Marcia Coyle

    With a full plate of problems in its 2013 term, the U.S. Supreme Court still found some humor in its pursuit of solutions, and sometimes at the expense of the lawyers appearing before it. Here are some lighter moments that provoked outright or nervous laughter—moments that some lawyers may prefer to forget.

  • Column: Clear and Simple Rules Are The Best, Except When They're Not

    By Alan B. Morrison

    In three cases this term, tradeoffs were made—and not made—between clear, simple rules on the one hand, versus more nuanced, but harder to enforce and interpret approaches on the other.

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