Legal Times

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Thomas Boggs of Patton Boggs photographed on October 17, 2012.

Thomas Boggs, Longtime Washington Influencer, Dies at 73

By Katelyn Polantz |

Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., whose name became synonymous with Washington lobbying through the success and growth of his former firm Patton Boggs, died Sunday night.

Jill and Scott Kelley photographed outside the U.S. Capitol.

Privacy Claim in Petraeus Scandal Lawsuit to Proceed

By Zoe Tillman |

A couple caught up in the sex scandal surrounding former CIA director David Petraeus can proceed with a privacy violation claim against the government, a federal judge in Washington ruled Monday.

E. Barrett Prettyman Court House.

No Cameras for NSA Surveillance Case, D.C. Circuit Says

By Zoe Tillman |

No watching for the watched. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Monday denied a request to broadcast Nov. 4 oral arguments in a case challenging the scope of the National Security Agency’s surveillance program.

Debo Adegbile, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to be Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice.

Civil Rights Advocate Debo Adegbile Joins Wilmer

By Tony Mauro |

Debo Adegbile, whose nomination to lead the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division was blocked in the Senate, joins Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr. The U.S. Supreme Court advocate and former NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund acting president will work in Wilmer's New York office.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from around the web and ALM-affiliated publications: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader speaks, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office nomination may be close, U.S. Attorney Eric Holder Jr. moves to dismiss a lawsuit and the U.S. Supreme Court gets schooled in rap.

Judge Emmet Sullivan, left, administers the oath to judge Robert Wilkins, right.

D.C. Circuit Judge Robert Wilkins Sworn In

By Zoe Tillman |

Judge Robert Wilkins was formally sworn in on Friday as the 61st judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit at a ceremony dedicated to the African American judges who preceded Wilkins on the bench.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Ginsburg Speaks Out on Congress, Women and the Constitution

By Tony Mauro |

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said Friday that a ruling like Burwell v. Hobby Lobby "is also something Congress would be able to fix." But, she said, Congress as it stands now "doesn't pass anything."

U.S. Capitol Building.

House Members Join Law Firms in Opposing Tax Change

By Katelyn Polantz |

A majority in the U.S. House of Representatives has lined up behind law firms and other businesses in a push against a proposed tax reform that would hit law firm partners with larger yearly tax burdens.

Marc Zwillinger.

Meet the Lawyer Behind Yahoo’s Fight Over Surveillance

By Zoe Tillman |

Marc Zwillinger has long been a “technology guy,” specializing in data security and privacy law. This week, he was in the news for his work with Yahoo! Inc., which has been pushing to unseal documents in a legal fight over government surveillance requests.

This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image taken on October 29, 2012, shows the Hurrican Sandy storm as it is centered off of Maryland and Virginia, heading in a northwestern direction.

Disability-Rights Advocates sue over DC's Emergency Plans

By Nate Beck |

Washington-area disability-rights advocates this week filed a federal class action against the District of Colombia and its mayor, alleging the city’s emergency plan discriminates against people with disabilities.

Sri Srinivasan.

D.C. Circuit Reverses $2.3M Verdict for Wrongfully Jailed Man

By Zoe Tillman |

The District of Columbia will not have to pay $2.3 million in damages to a man who spent 10 years in jail after his parole was revoked in violation of his constitutional rights, a federal appeals court ruled on Friday.

Masterfile Corp. accuses a D.C. firm of using stock images—seen here, as depicted in the complaint—without permission.

Law Firm Sued Over Use of Stock Images on Website

By Zoe Tillman |

Men and women in suits sitting around talking. That classic web image is one way law firms show prospective clients what they do. A new lawsuit in Washington accuses a D.C. firm of ripping off stock images for its website without permission.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from around the web and ALM-affiliated publications: new records on feds' surveillance demands, NFL turns to Wilmer for Ray Rice investigation and a guilty verdict for Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorious.

Robert Mueller

NFL Investigation Leads to Questions on Law Firm Choice

By Katelyn Polantz |

Clients often hire firms with whom they have a business connection, as Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr does with the NFL. But those choices must gain the trust of a scrutinizing public that seeks independent answers, such as in the Ray Rice investigation.

U.S. Capitol building.

Campaign Finance Constitutional Amendment Fails in Senate

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Senate on Thursday effectively blocked a proposed constitutional amendment aimed at limiting the influence of money in political campaigns.

David Skaggs.

Corporate Lawyers Cautioned by Government Ethics Office

By Andrew Ramonas |

Although the Office of Congressional Ethics doesn't have subpoena power, the leaders of the secretive House body on Thursday warned corporate lawyers in Washington, D.C., not to dismiss its requests for information.

Tracy Druce

Houston Lawyer Settles Patent Office Disciplinary Action

By Brenda Sapino Jeffreys |

Tracy Druce, a co-executive partner in Houston firm Novak Druce Connolly Bove + Quigg, asked to be removed from the list of registered practitioners before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, but he will have to jump through hoops if he seeks reinstatement as a result of a settlement in a USPTO disciplinary action that was filed over allegations he failed to adequately supervise an assistant.

Mary Kendall.

Interior IG on Hot Seat for Refusing to Hand Over Documents

By Jenna Greene |

Questioning the "integrity and independence" of Interior Department deputy inspector general Mary Kendall, House Natural Resources Committee chairman Doc Hastings, R-Wash., in a hearing Thursday grilled Kendall for refusing to comply with a subpoena issued six months ago by the committee.

Chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Royce Lamberth

SEC Lawyer Loses Discrimination Lawsuit Against the Agency

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington ruled this week that a U.S. Securities and Exchange lawyer couldn’t proceed with her racial discrimination lawsuit against the agency.

Larry Klayman.

DC Circuit Urged to Broadcast NSA Surveillance Argument

By Mike Scarcella |

Larry Klayman wants the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to allow televised broadcast of the court's Nov. 4 argument over NSA bulk collection of phone records.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of legal news from around the web and ALM-affiliated publications: The U.S. Supreme Court places same-sex marriage cases on the agenda, Locke Lord and Edwards Wildman Palmer are looking to create Locke Lord Edwards, the National Football League is turning to former FBI Director Robert Mueller III for help and The Washington Post profiles U.S. deputy solicitor general Edwin Kneedler.

Tony West

Report: DOJ's Tony West Heads to PepsiCo Law Dept.

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

Tony West, third in command at the U.S. Department of Justice, is reportedly heading to PepsiCo Inc. as the company's general counsel.

Time to Upgrade 28-Year-Old Electronic Privacy Law?

By Andrew Ramonas |

Apple Inc., Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp. are putting new pressure on Congress to update a 28-year-old law that governs how the federal government can obtain U.S. citizens' electronic data.

Rosemary Collyer.

Suit Over EPA's Deleted Text Messages to Proceed

By Nate Beck |

A pro-business advocacy group can move forward with a suit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that challenges top officials' deletions of text messages, a federal judge has ruled.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from around the web and ALM-affiliated publications: prosecutors defend the Ray Rice plea; Home Depot cyberattack fall out; why are insider trading sentences so stiff?

State AGs Seek FCC Ruling on Blocking Telemarketers

By Jenna Greene |

The National Association of Attorneys General on Tuesday asked the Federal Communications Commission whether it’s legal for telephone companies to use call-blocking technology to thwart telemarketers.

Elizabeth Warren.

Warren Blames Bank Regulators for Lack of Prosecutions

By Jenna Greene |

Criticizing government prosecutors for failing to hold senior bank executives criminally liable for the financial crisis is nothing new, but Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D.-Mass., in a hearing on Tuesday spread the blame further, lambasting the Federal Reserve and other banking regulators who appeared before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs.

(l-r) Eric Conn, Kara Maciel, and Bryan Carey.

New D.C. Boutique to Focus on Labor and Employment Law

By Andrew Ramonas |

Washington attorneys Eric Conn, Kara Maciel and Bryan Carey have opened Conn Maciel Carey in the city to help businesses handle labor and employment litigation, workplace safety regulations and other employee problems facing companies.

U.S. Federal Trade Commission building. October 16, 2012. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

FTC Continues Its Pay-for-Delay Battle Through AbbVie Suit

By Gina Passarella |

As the pharmaceutical industry awaits the Third Circuit's decision in a case over whether pay-for-delay settlements are anti-competitive even without including a direct cash payment, the Federal Trade Commission has sued a number of pharmaceutical companies in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania over one such accord.

Four D.C. Senior Judges Up for Reappointment

By Zoe Tillman |

Four senior judges in the District of Columbia’s local trial and appellate courts are seeking reappointment: D.C. Court of Appeals Judge Warren King and D.C. Superior Court judges Kaye Christian, Brook Hedge and Judith Retchin.

(l-r) Chuck Grassley and Harry Reid.

Senate to Debate Campaign Finance Constitutional Amendment

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Senate begins floor debate Tuesday on a long-shot constitutional amendment that would overturn U.S. Supreme Court precedents and allow Congress and the states to restrict the flow of money in political campaigns.

Tech Industry Tries Again on Surveillance Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

With Congress back to work in Washington this week, the technology industry is pushing senators to pass legislation that would rein in National Security Agency surveillance and make its work more transparent.

Jack Lew.

Treasury Dept. Crafting Plan to Restrict Inversions

By Andrew Ramonas |

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Monday said the U.S. Treasury Department intends to release a plan to help curb corporate tax inversions in the "very near future," but he warned that any agency effort to limit companies' use of the tax-lowering tactic won't fix the problem without help from Congress.

Sung-Hee Suh.

Schulte Roth's Sung-Hee Suh Heads to DOJ

By Nate Beck |

Veteran white-collar criminal defense attorney Sung-Hee Suh is leaving private practice for a top post in the U.S. Department of Justice's Criminal Division, the department announced Monday.

Robert McDowell.

Wiley Rein Hires Former FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell

By Andrew Ramonas |

Wiley Rein has snagged former Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Robert McDowell to help bolster its work on telecommunications and technology law and policy, the firm announced Monday.

Christopher

Government Seeks More Time in Benghazi Prosecution

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington on Monday granted the U.S. Department of Justice’s request for more time to collect and produce evidence in its case against Abu Ahmed Khatallah, the man charged with aiding the September 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate complex in Benghazi, Libya.

Demonstration outside the U.S. Supreme Court to bring attention to reconsideration of the Citizens United v. FEC decision.  February 23, 2012.

Former ACLU Leaders Quarrel With Current Leadership Over Campaign Finance

By Tony Mauro |

The long-simmering debate within the American Civil Liberties Union over free speech and campaign finance reform has erupted again on the eve of a U.S. Senate vote on amending the Constitution to allow limits on money in politics.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A new wave of abortion-related litigation is making its way to the U.S. Supreme Court, a campaign to force disclosure of corporate political spending has bombarded the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission with more than 1 million comments, the legal sector is adding jobs and Congress returns from recess.

Corporations Ask Supreme Court to Review Same-Sex Marriage

By Sue Reisinger |

Thirty major U.S. corporations, from Alcoa Inc. to Viacom Inc., Thursday filed a friend of the court brief with the U.S. Supreme Court, urging the Court to grant certiorari and hear appeals on same-sex marriage cases.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building.

SEC Names First Ombudsman

By Jenna Greene |

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday named its first-ever ombudsman, Tracey McNeil, a former Hunton & Williams lawyer who is a senior counsel in the SEC’s Office of Minority and Women Inclusion.

The Internet Association Brings FTC Lawyer In-house

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Internet Association, a leading technology trade group that counts Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Google Inc. among its members, has picked up Federal Trade Commission lawyer Abigail Slater as its first in-house counsel.

(l-r) Kurtis Tunnel, Marie-Joelle Khouzam, and Thomas Washbush.

How to Lure a Rival Managing Partner

By Katelyn Polantz |

Not often do law firms lose their managers on the lateral market. This year, Bricker & Eckler, a midsized Ohio firm that works in energy and business law, enticed two leaders from other firms to change jobs. The National Law Journal spoke with Kurtis Tunnell, Bricker & Eckler's managing partner.

Stuart Delery.

DOJ Civil Division Chief Named Acting Associate Attorney General

By Zoe Tillman |

Stuart Delery, head of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Division, was named Friday the acting associate attorney general—the third highest-ranking official at the agency.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: jurors speak out about finding Bob McDonnell guilty, a DOJ promotion and Google racks up patent wins.

Bob McDonnell.

After McDonnell Guilty Verdict, a Look Ahead to Appeal

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal jury in Virginia on Thursday found former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell and his wife Maureen guilty of public corruption charges. McDonnell’s lawyers say they plan to appeal, according to news reports, but the verdict is for now a high-profile win for the U.S. Department of Justice.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr.

DOJ Announces Ferguson Police Dept. Civil Rights Investigation

By Zoe Tillman |

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. announced on Thursday that the U.S. Department of Justice had initiated an investigation into the practices of the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department.

Alexander Macgillivray, Office of Science and Technology Policy deputy chief technology officer

White House Picks Ex-Twitter G.C. For Tech Post

By Cheryl Miller |

President Obama on Thursday named two Silicon Valley executives as his top technology advisors.

Washington Redskins Training Camp August 4,  2011.

FCC Filing Tackles Redskins Team Name as Broadcast Slur

By Sue Reisinger |

An activist law professor who considers the name of the Washington Redskins football team to be a racial slur said Tuesday he has filed legal opposition to the renewal of a broadcast license for the National Football League team’s owner.

Richard Roberts.

Wrongfully Convicted Man Fights DC Over Damages

By Zoe Tillman |

DNA evidence exonerated Donald Gates, who was convicted of raping and murdering a Georgetown University student in 1981. Over the past three years, he’s wrangled with lawyers for the District of Columbia over whether the city should have to pay him for the nearly 30 years he spent in prison.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: DOJ probe in Ferguson, Mo., courtroom defeats for ex-Goldman Sachs employees and a D.C.-based political consultant caught up in a Philadelphia corruption probe.

(l-r) Richard Oparil, Scott Chambers, managing partner Jeffrey Campbell and Kevin Bell.

New Jersey's Porzio Finds D.C. Office Through Squire Patton Boggs

By Katelyn Polantz |

A midsized New Jersey law firm has hired an intellectual property litigation group from Squire Patton Boggs to open a Washington office. The lateral acquisitions represent a significant departure from legacy Patton Boggs’ IP group.

Tony West.

Associate Attorney General Tony West to Leave DOJ

By Zoe Tillman |

Associate Attorney General Tony West will leave the U.S. Department of Justice later this month, the department announced on Wednesday.

Jenny Yang.

Jenny Yang Named New Chair of EEOC

By Marcia Coyle |

A divided Equal Employment Opportunity Commission may be in the agency's the future, at least temporarily, as vice chairwoman Jenny Yang steps into the chair seat vacated this week by Jacqueline Berrien.

U.S. Supreme Court building.

Public Wants Video in U.S. Supreme Court, Poll Shows

By Tony Mauro |

Nearly three-quarters of the public wants the U.S. Supreme Court to allow video broadcast of its proceedings, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Halliburton to pay $1 billion; seeking Michael Brown's juvenile records; can creditors take Detroit's art?

John Elwood.

Full D.C. Circuit Won't Hear Whistleblower's Dispute Over KBR Docs

By Andrew Ramonas |

The full U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Tuesday declined to hear a dispute over whether Kellogg Brown & Root Services Inc. should be forced to disclose certain internal documents to a whistleblower.

Nina Pillard.

Mass Arrest of Partygoers Unlawful, Divided D.C. Circuit Says

By Tony Mauro |

A divided federal appeals court panel on Tuesday ruled against D.C. police who arrested a group of partygoers in 2008 for unlawful entry at a house where the host had not yet signed a lease.

Members of Dive Bar swim with a whale shark off the coast of Mexico this summer.

Diving with Sharks and General Counsel

By Katelyn Polantz |

Even when lawyers go scuba diving, they’re still lawyers. The Underwater Bar Association, a lawyer group based in Florida that organizes dives and ocean-related volunteer work, took a handful of members in June far into the Gulf of Mexico for three days.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: A Texas law imposing new regulations on abortion clinics has fallen into limbo, General Motors Co.'s record recalls of nearly 30 million cars and trucks across the globe has so tainted the brand that every one of its customers has lost money, trade groups and big companies in the service industry are redeploying their lobbying forces and reluctantly preparing to live with the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate and Hollywood celebrities are threatening legal action against anyone who distributes nude photographs taken from the stars' personal online storage accounts.

Neal Katyal of Hogan Lovells takes the ice bucket challenge.

Lawyers and the Ice Bucket Challenge: A Video Collection

By Katelyn Polantz |

Since Venable's firmwide ice-bucket challenge soaked their terrace two weeks ago, we've found a collection of other ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos from prominent firms and lawyers.

Daniel Marti.

Kilpatrick's Danny Marti Picked for Federal IP Czar

By Andrew Ramonas |

Danny Marti, managing partner of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton’s Washington office, is President Barack Obama's pick for the administration's next intellectual property "czar," the White House said Thursday. The announcement drew praise from the technology and recording industries.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

SEC Pays Whistleblower $300K

By Jenna Greene |

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission paid a whistleblower who first tried to report wrongdoing internally more than $300,000, the agency announced on Friday.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Reporting on Louisiana, a diabetes drug verdict, Paul Clement and Chevron’s Lago Agrio case: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

airplane

Value of Bank's 'Thank You' Points is Taxable, Court Says

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Tax Court, siding with the Internal Revenue Service, said this week the value of an airline ticket purchased with a bank's thank-you points for opening an account is taxable as gross income.

7-eleven

Lobbyists Put Congressmen to Work at Convenience Stores

By Andrew Ramonas |

7-Eleven Inc. and Maverick Inc. put members of Congress to work behind their counters this month as part of a lobbying campaign by the former National Association of Convenience Stores to convince lawmakers to address retailers' concerns about menu labeling, data security and payment-card swipe fees.

National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C.

Tenth Cir. Validates Action By Contested NLRB Member

By Tony Mauro |

A federal appeals court on Wednesday interpreted the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling on presidential recess appointments to validate action taken by a previously contested member of the National Labor Relations Board.

EEOC building

EEOC to Sign Worker Protection Pact with Mexican Government

By Jenna Greene |

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will sign a national memorandum of understanding with the Mexican government on Friday, pledging to help protect the rights of Mexican citizens working in the United States.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |
E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse.

D.C. Federal Magistrate Judge Vacancy Notice Posted

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia is seeking applicants to fill a vacancy for a federal magistrate judge.

Microsoft Takes its Overseas Email Case to the Beach

By Andrew Ramonas |

As Washingtonians soak up the sun at their favorite beaches this week, Microsoft Corp. is trying to encourage them to help keep overseas user data out of the hands of the U.S. government unless the feds have foreign cooperation.

Jeffrey Lesk.

Cross Pennsylvania Avenue Off The Hot List

By Katelyn Polantz |

Law firms, Washington’s largest private-sector real estate tenants, have razed tradition to cater more to the city’s young intelligentsia when choosing new locations, according to some of the city’s law firm and real estate leaders.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: IMF head Christine Lagarde under investigation; a daring win for Latham; does the Supreme Court shield bad cops?

Blair Mountain in West Virginia.

Environmental Groups Win Round in Battle Over Blair Mountain

By Jenna Greene |

Almost 100 years ago, Blair Mountain in West Virginia was the site of the largest armed labor conflict in U.S. history. Now it’s the site of a new fight. On one side are conservation groups led by the Sierra Club that want the battlefield listed on National Register of Historic Places; on the other are coal companies that own much of the land and oppose the designation.

Burger King's Merger Plan, With a Side of Inversion Worry

By Andrew Ramonas |

Burger King Worldwide Inc. executives on Tuesday dismissed concerns from members of Congress and others that the fast food giant's $11.4 billion proposed merger with Canadian coffee and doughnut chain Tim Hortons Inc. is intended to decrease the U.S. company's taxes through the so-called corporate inversion process.

David Schizer.

Columbia Law Prof Named to Ginsburg Chair at Georgetown

By Tony Mauro |

Columbia Law School professor David Schizer will be the next occupant of an endowed chair at Georgetown University Law Center named after Martin Ginsburg, the late husband of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

PACER Changes Draw Ire of Attorneys, Journalists

By Todd Ruger |

The federal judiciary this month removed years of court records from its online archives, drawing concern from attorneys, journalists, researchers and open-record advocates who rely on remote access to files.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Antonin Scalia speaks in Idaho, America's rural lawyer shortage and shrinking office space for lawyers.

No Conflict at Manatt For Former Patton Partner Ben Chew

By Katelyn Polantz |

Benjamin Chew, a former Patton Boggs partner whose subsequent job was compromised because of Patton’s involvement in a legal fraud suit, has landed at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips. It's the third Washington law office Chew has worked out of this year, after a brief tenure at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman that his affiliation with Patton had clouded.

D.C. Urges Judge to Reconsider Public Firearms Ruling

By Mike Scarcella |

The District of Columbia on Monday asked a federal trial judge to reconsider his ruling that declared unconstitutional the city’s ban on carrying firearms in public.

David Rivkin, Jr.

House Republicans Hire Baker & Hostetler for Obama Suit

By Todd Ruger |

House Republicans hired Baker & Hostetler to bring a lawsuit against President Barack Obama, according to a contract approved Monday and posted on the Committee on House Administration.

Jonathan Yarowsky.

Patent Reform Group Streamlines Lobbying Efforts

By Andrew Ramonas |

After legislation to combat patent trolls stalled in the Senate, the Coalition for Patent Fairness, an advocacy group for Google Inc., Samsung Electronics Co. and other technology companies, has winnowed down its roster of lobbying firms to one.

Richard Leon.

Settlement Docs Secret in 'Fast and Furious,' Judge Says

By Mike Scarcella |

A federal trial judge in Washington will not force the government to reveal the substance of its settlement talks with the House of Representatives over access to information rooted in the Fast and Furious gun sting.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: The "quick-witted and direct" judge presiding over former Virginia governor Robert McDonnell's corruption trial, Attorney General Eric Holder Jr.'s civil rights legacy, the trusting friendship between Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Houston trial lawyer Tony Buzbee, Federal Aviation Administration lawsuits over drones and model aircraft and government tracking of cellphones.

Sri Srinivasan.

Appeals Court Says It Can’t Fix Judge’s Sentencing Mistake

By Zoe Tillman |

Prosecutors and defense lawyers agree that a federal judge in Washington made a mistake when he sentenced Derrek Arrington to two back-to-back terms of supervised release. (They could only run concurrently.) But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Friday said it was powerless to fix the error.

Risa Lieberwitz.

University Professors Assoc. GC at the Head of the Class

By Andrew Ramonas |

The American Association of University Professors has tapped Cornell University law professor Risa Lieberwitz as its general counsel, the Washington-based trade group announced this week.

Stephen Leckar.

Drug Case Sentencing Dispute Pitched to Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court may decide next month whether to wade into a long-simmering debate: In deciding the length of a criminal sentence, can federal judges take into consideration conduct for which the defendant was acquitted?

Another Firm Iced: Arnold & Porter, Zuckerman Add Support to ALS Charity Campaign

By Katelyn Polantz |

Arnold & Porter and Zuckerman Spaeder were among a number of legal groups in Washington and elsewhere to take part in the ALS awareness-raising charity campaign that has gone viral on social-networking sites this month.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on race in America, a jury consultant quiz and another federal judge strikes down a same-sex marriage ban.

Frank Schwelb.

D.C. Court of Appeals Judge Frank Schwelb Dies

By Zoe Tillman |

District of Columbia Court of Appeals Judge Frank Schwelb, who served as a judge in the city’s local courts since 1979, died on Aug. 13.

US. Department of Labor headquarters at the Frances Perkins Building in Washington, DC.

6.1M Workers Could Benefit from Raised Overtime Threshold

By Andrew Ramonas |

Employers could end up paying 6.1 million more workers overtime if the U.S. Department of Labor moves ahead with a proposal to change salary regulations to adjust for inflation, according to an analysis [LINK: ] issued by a left-leaning think tank on Wednesday.

Alex Kozinski, left, and John Bates, right.

Chief Judge Kozinski Weighs in on Surveillance Reform

By Tony Mauro |

The federal judiciary, which usually presents a united front to Congress and the public, is showing some cracks over the issue of reforming the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Amy Berman Jackson.

Judge Orders DOJ to Disclose 'Fast and Furious' Records

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington has ordered the U.S. Department of Justice to release certain records about its response to a congressional investigation into a controversial gun sting operation, and to justify its decision to withhold others.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

A court case involving the late model Anna Nicole Smith, the U.S. Supreme Court weighs in on same-sex marriage in Virginia and a managing partner at Squire Patton Boggs discusses the mergers: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Attorney General Eric Holder shakes hands with Bradley J. Rayford, 22 following his meeting at St. Louis Community College Florissant Valley in Ferguson, Mo., Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014.

In Ferguson, Eric Holder Reflects on Personal History

By Todd Ruger |

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. met with community groups and law enforcement Wednesday in Ferguson, Mo., urging cooperation to reduce tension after days of clashes between police and protesters.

Demonstrations outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Justices Block Virginia Same-Sex Marriages

By Tony Mauro |

As expected, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday delayed enforcement of a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Virginia's ban on same-sex marriages.

Demonstrations outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Justices Block Virginia Same-Sex Marriages

By Tony Mauro |

As expected, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday delayed enforcement of a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Virginia's ban on same-sex marriages.

WMATA Settles Whistleblower's Fraud Claims for $4.2M

By Jimmy Hoover |

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has agreed to pay $4.2 million to the feds for allegedly giving out uncompetitive software contracts that used federal funding, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Rick Perry's legal team; Eric Holder promises robust action in Ferguson; Squire Patton Boggs loses Middle East group.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr.

Eric Holder Pledges 'Robust Action' in Ferguson

By Todd Ruger |

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. on Tuesday took his message directly to the residents of Ferguson, Mo., pledging in an op-ed "robust action" to bridge gaps between law enforcement officials and their communities.

Texas Governor Rick Perry

Two D.C. Lawyers Join Rick Perry Defense Team

By Angela Morris |

Gov. Rick Perry has assembled a legal team of state and national power players to fight his felony charges.