Blog of Legal Times

Martin Shkreli, former Chief Executive Officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform during a hearing titled

Morning Wrap: John Roberts' Stock Sale | Shkreli Sneers

By C. Ryan Barber |

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. sells off hundreds of thousands of dollars in Microsoft stock to avoid a possible conflict. Martin Shkreli sneers at members of Congress. And the NYT profiles the NFL's in-house investigator—a former Manhattan prosecutor. This is a roundup from ALM and other outlets.

Kevyn Orr of Jones Day.

Morning Wrap: Documentary Subjects Appear in Court | Pardons Old and New | Metro Retains Kevyn Orr

By Katelyn Polantz |

HBO’s “The Jinx” subject Robert Durst and the podcast subject Adnan Syed both see movement in their criminal cases. The Justice Department names a new pardon attorney, while a news outlet finds a premature clemency request from Chelsea Clinton’s father-in-law that her president dad never granted: This is a round-up of news from ALM and other outlets.

U.S. Capitol.

Morning Wrap: Shkreli Snags Celeb Lawyer | Exonerations Hit New Record

By Mike Scarcella |

Martin Shkreli prepares with a new lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, to appear on Capitol Hill tomorrow. Exonerations in criminal cases hit a new record in 2015, a new report found. The Florida Supreme Court's weighing a request to temporarily halt executions. And legal fallout from the Flint water crisis ramps up. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh, Northern District of California

Morning Wrap: Lucy Koh for the Ninth Circuit | Oyez's Uncertain Future

By Mike Sacks |

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh is expected to be nominated to the Ninth Circuit. The Supreme Court-focused site Oyez faces an uncertain future. And a federal judge has challenged the Obama administration's Iran-U.S. prisoner swap. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Justice Clarence Thomas

Morning Wrap: Thomas' Silence | Judge Faces Civil Rights Charge | Super Bowl = Super Bust for Lawyers

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Clarence Thomas' silence on the bench, a Maryland judge charged with civil rights violation and more Dickstein Shapiro departures.

Eric Holder, Covington & Burling

Morning Wrap: Eric Holder's Apple Watch | More Dickstein Defections | Harvard Sued Over Worker Classification

By C. Ryan Barber |

Two more Dickstein Shapiro lawyers leave the firm as its future remains ever more cloudy. Former AG Eric Holder Jr. sits down to talk about Covington, the Yates memo and, among other things, his new Apple watch. A massage therapist sues Harvard University over her classification as a contractor. Sen. Elizabeth Warren criticizes the work of enforcement agencies in a New York Times op-ed. This is a roundup of legal news from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: ‘Claire Dire’ Looks Back on Jury Duty | Would a Political Convention Starring Trump Be Bad for Business?

By Katelyn Polantz |

Sen. Claire McCaskill live-tweets her jury duty and lobbyists consider the fallout for their clients during a Donald Trump presidential nomination: This is a round-up of news from ALM and other outlets.

U.S. Department of Justice after the blizzard of 2016.

Morning Wrap: Ex-DOJ Lawyer Faces Ethics Charges After Press Leak | GM Plaintiffs Lawyers Quarrel

By Michael A. Scarcella |

Thomas Tamm, the Justice Department lawyer who exposed the Bush-era warrantless wiretap program to the public, faces attorney-discipline charges in Washington. SCOTUS is asked to block the Obama administration's new CO2 rules. And a plaintiffs lawyer handling GM cases wants a judge to remove co-lead plaintiffs counsel. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

The U.S. Department of Justice on Jan. 24, a day after a major snowstorm walloped the metro region.

Morning Wrap: Shkreli Gets Snow Day | Prosecuting Petraeus | Rethinking Solitary

By Mike Sacks |

Ex-drug company executive Martin Shkreli's planned Tuesday appearance in the House was pushed back to February. President Obama announces sweeping changes to limit solitary confinement, including banning it for juveniles in federal custody. And the Washington Post tells the back story of the criminal case against David Petraeus. This is a daily roundup of legal news from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Same-Sex Union Foes Pay Up | Ted Cruz at the Supreme Court | N.C. Voter-ID Law On Trial

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: an analysis of the legal fees that states have been ordered or agreed to pay in same-sex marriage cases, Cruz's Supreme Court record and a new class action over tainted water in Flint, Michigan.

U.S. Capitol.

Morning Wrap: Shkreli Clashes With Congress | Embattled Nev. Judge Takes Senior Status

By C. Ryan Barber |

Martin Shkreli, the former pharmaceutical executive who grabbed headlines for raising the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent, is fighting back against Congress. A Nevada federal trial judge who's clashed with the Ninth Circuit will take senior status. And a federal judge in New York finds "fraud" at the GM bellwether trial—a significant blow to the plaintiffs' case.

Beth Wilkinson of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison

Morning Wrap: Beth Wilkinson’s Future Firm and Ted Cruz’s Past Practice

By Katelyn Polantz |

Ted Cruz’s clerkship at the Supreme Court and the launch of a new trial boutique: This is a round-up of news from ALM and other outlets.

Massive rally in favor of immigration law reform, held at the Mall in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 10, 2006.

Video: NLJ's Marcia Coyle on DOJ's Immigration Case

By Staff |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's chief Washington correspondent, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff on Tuesday about the Supreme Court's decision to take a new major case—the Obama administration's immigration appeal.

U.S. Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C.

Morning Wrap: Lawyers Herald U.S.-Iran Swap | Giuliani Goes to Greenberg | Shkreli to Lawyer-Shop

By Mike Scarcella |

More on the U.S.-Iran prisoner swap. Rudolph Giuliani goes to Greenberg Traurig. Martin Shkreli wants a new legal team. And details emerge about the resignation of Deborah Leff, the Justice Department's pardon attorney. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Eleanor Holmes Norton.

Secrecy of D.C. Judges' Financial Disclosures Challenged in New Bill

By Zoe Tillman |

Judges in the District of Columbia's local courts annually file detailed financial reports, but the information is largely kept under seal. Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-District of Columbia, wants to change that.

Morning Wrap: Wilmer Helped WaPo in Iran Talks | Trump v. Cruz (and John Roberts Jr.)

By Mike Sacks |

The Washington Post hired a Wilmer Hale lawyer to help work on the release of reporter Jason Rezaian. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump takes to attacking Sen. Ted Cruz's support for Chief Justice John Roberts. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Demonstrators with Witness Against Torture, a network of anti-torture activists, stand outside the supreme court while oral arguments in Boumediene v. Bush and Al Odah v. United States are delivered inside.  December 5, 2007.

Morning Wrap: Gitmo Population Falls Below 100 | St. Louis Rams Fans Sue Team

By C. Ryan Barber |

The Guantanamo detainee population has fallen to double-digits since 2002, when the military first began moving prisoners there. A day after the National Football League approved the team's move from St. Louis, fans of the soon-to-be Los Angeles Rams sued the team. And Planned Parenthood Federation of America sues California-based anti-abortion activists. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Melinda Haag

Morning Wrap: A Flurry of Personnel Announcements

By Katelyn Polantz |

Updates on the employment of Justin Levitt of Loyola Law School, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan and Melinda Haag, a former U.S. Attorney in California. This is a round-up of news from ALM and other outlets.

U.S. Internal Revenue Service

Morning Wrap: Tea Party Class Certified in IRS Suit | GM Trial Opens

By Michael A. Scarcella |

A federal judge in Ohio certifies a class of Tea Party groups in a suit against the IRS. The justices prepare to hear a dispute over using Iranian bank assets to compensate terror victims. And the GM trial's underway in New York. This is a legal news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Anthony Kennedy.

NLJ's Marcia Coyle on Public-Sector Unions, David Bowie

By Staff |

Marcia Coyle, NLJ’s chief Washington correspondent, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff about the Supreme Court’s arguments Monday in the public-sector union case Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. The conservative justices appear poised to rule against mandatory fees. And Coyle offers a memory of the songwriter David Bowie.

U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Wrap: 'El Chapo' Turf Tussle at DOJ | Ex-AUSA Reinstated After 7 Years

By Michael A. Scarcella |

Prosecutors across the country line up to take the "El Chapo" drug case. A federal prosecutor will get nearly $2 million in a lump sum and back pay&mdashnot to mention reinstatement&mdashafter reaching a deal with the U.S. Justice Department over retaliation claims. Baltimore officials question whether to pay Wilmer Hale millions for police-related review work. And the Supreme Court's conservative justices are poised to rule against public-sector unions. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Gitmo's 14th Anniversary | PACER Class Action | Chicago Law Dept. Under Review

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A story about David Bowie and a copyright dispute, federal judiciary sued over access to records and a former U.S. attorney will review a division of Chicago's law department.

Morning Wrap: Claims Against Law School to Head to Trial | Clinton Talks SCOTUS | Is Fitbit Fibbing?

By C. Ryan Barber |

False-advertising claims brought by four former students of Thomas Jefferson School of Law can head to trial. Hillary Clinton talks SCOTUS appointments in a Boston Globe op-ed. And NPR profiles Monique Pressley, a Washington lawyer representing Bill Cosby. This is a news roundup from the NLJ and other publication.

American Bar Association office in Washington, D.C. June 23, 2014. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: Contention High From Keystone Pipeline, Alabama Supreme Court, ABA and in Antitrust Law

By Katelyn Polantz |

TransCanada Keystone Pipeline sues the feds, while Alabama and the American Bar Association take strong positions on same-sex marriage licenses and immigrant deportation raids, respectively. This is a round-up of news from ALM and other outlets.

Phyllis Thompson.

DC Weighs Allowing 3Ls to Take the Bar Exam

By Zoe Tillman |

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals is considering a proposal to allow third-year law students to take the bar exam months before they graduate, a policy that only a handful of states have adopted.

Rally in April 2007 by pro-choice groups outside the Supreme Court protesting the court's decision to uphold the federal ban on

Morning Wrap: Al Jazeera Hit With Defamation Suit | Abortion Stories at SCOTUS

By Michael A. Scarcella |

Professional baseball players Ryan Zimmerman and Ryan Howard are suing Al Jazeera America over its report about performance-enhancing drugs. And more than 100 women lawyers sign an amicus brief telling the Supreme Court about their abortions. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch testifies in the Senate on May 7 about the Justice Department's budget.

Morning Wrap: Gun Fight | Do the Justices Have Mail?

By Mike Scarcella |

President Obama is set today to roll out executive action on gun control. The Justice Department urges the Supreme Court to strike down Texas abortion regulations. And a public-records suit in Washington seeks any email correspondence between the solicitor general and the justices. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS v. 2016 Election | Iran Terror Case | Theft of Lincoln's Hand

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the U.S. Supreme Court in the new year, review of compensation for victims of terrorism and a cameras in the courtroom success story.

Morning Wrap: Bill Cosby’s Lawyer Reacts | Baker & McKenzie Mourns Miami Tax Partner | New Year’s Eve List of Lists

By Katelyn Polantz |

Two BigLaw firms are mourning tragedies this week. NPR interviewed Bill Cosby’s lawyer. And we wrap up several more legal news stories and year-end overviews for the last day of 2015.

Morning Wrap: Spotify Sued | Ex-Federal Prosecutor Wins Back Pay

By Mike Scarcella |

A suit in California accuses the music streaming service Spotify of copyright infringement. A former federal prosecutor wins reinstatement and hundreds of thousands of dollars in back pay. And colleagues of the former Mayer Brown partner who wrote The Revenant—now a major motion picture—open up. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

U.S. Supreme Court. December 9, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Photo Mystery Solved | Massey Energy Prosecutor to Resign

By Mike Sacks |

Tony Mauro reports on the researcher who debunked the myth of the cancellation of the justices' 1924 group photo. The West Virginia prosecutor who oversaw the Massey Energy case is stepping down. And the Federal Circuit hands Cisco a patent victory. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

People wait outside the U.S. Supreme Court the week a decision in the same-sex marriage case Obergefell v Hodges is expected. June 22, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: Supreme Court Highlights | The Year in D.C. Big Law

By Mike Scarcella |

Reflections on 2015: U.S. Supreme Court, Big Law, Judicial Misconduct, Congress. Also: Judge Harry Pregerson of the Ninth Circuit looks back at his career. And Justice Stephen Breyer, in a rare Sunday TV appearance, talks shop. This is a roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Christmas Eve News and Rankings

By Katelyn Polantz |

We call this one the pre-Christmas rush: A handful of firms (and Supreme Court justices) come forth to share news of retiring firm founders, an office closure and an argument date. Plus, some superlatives and rankings so lawyers can reflect back on a year of hard work. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

A sign marks the location of the Whole Women's Health of Fort Worth clinic, Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Fort Worth, Texas.

Supreme Court To Hear Arguments on Texas Abortion Restrictions Case in March

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments March 2 in the challenge to Texas' restrictions on abortion clinics—the first major abortion argument before the justices in eight years.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit at 717 Madison Place, N.W.

Morning Wrap: The Year in SCOTUS Transparency | 'Slants' Ruling Could Boost Washington Football Team

By Mike Scarcella |

A key First Amendment ruling could boost the Washington Redskins' effort to protect the team's name. A judge narrows the prosecution of a group of Supreme Court protesters. And the feds prepare to release nearly 200 photos depicting the treatment of prisoners in U.S. custody overseas. This is a roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Morning Wrap: The Quotable Supreme Court | The Year in Law Schools

By Mike Sacks |

A look back at some of the more memorable quotes from the Supreme Court justices in 2015. Donations, deans and dwindling enrollment: highlights from the year in law schools. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Blatter Barred | Loyal Justices | Bernie Sanders v. DNC

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: FIFA ethics committee bars Sepp Blatter, Bernie Sanders' campaign sued the DNC and a new study explores the Supreme Court justices' loyalty to the president who appointed them.

Todd Kim.

Appeals Court Nominee in Limbo as Senate Confirms Two More D.C. Judges

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Senate late Thursday confirmed two judges to the District of Columbia Superior Court, the second set of confirmations this year after more than two years of no action to fill judicial vacancies in the local courts.

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr.

Morning Wrap: John Roberts' Stock Conflict | Shkreli's Cuffed | Fla. Judge Removed From Bench

By C. Ryan Barber |

Bloomberg reports on another stock conflict at the Supreme Court—this one involving Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. Pharma exec Martin Shkreli and Kaye Scholer partner Evan Greebel face securities fraud charges in New York. Squire Patton Boggs announces changes to its leadership in Washington. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Jim Weinberg, left, president of Richmond-based Hirschler Fleischer, and Wayne Travell, right, managing partner of Leach Travell, a Northern Virginia boutique that is combining with the larger Virginia firm.  December 17, 2015.

Richmond Law Firm Expands Inside the Beltway with Small-Firm Acquisition

By Katelyn Polantz |

The regional Virginia law firm Hirschler Fleischer will put its name on a law office in Tysons Corner through the acquisition of Leach Travell, a seven-lawyer firm that partners spun off from Venable in Washington more than a decade ago. The firms jointly announced the combination this week. "We were looking for an opportunity to extend into Northern Virginia," James Weinberg, Hirschler Fleischer's president, said. "It just seemed like a natural fit."

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher offices in D.C.

Morning Wrap: New Jersey Judge Scolds Gibson Dunn on Bridgegate Investigation

By Katelyn Polantz |

Gibson Dunn lawyers are wrist-slapped in court, Venable could face a malpractice suit it thought it had fought off, and two Colorado law firms fight over the name Gilbert: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

Despite Some Gripes, CFPB Workers Mostly Happy, Survey Finds

By C. Ryan Barber |

Although employees of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau overwhelmingly see their jobs as significant and satisfying, nearly half feel that compensation is not based on performance, according to a survey released this week.

Anti-death penalty activists hold a four day liquid-only fast and vigil to mark the anniversaries of the 1972 Furman and 1976 Gregg Supreme Court decisions involving the death penalty. The vigil, organized by the Abolitionist Action Committee, coincided with court's last public session of the current term when the opinion in Glossip v. Gross was expected to be announced. June 29, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: Executions Fall to Lowest Number in 25 Years

By Mike Scarcella |

Executions in the United States are at their lowest number in nearly 25 years. Dickstein partners vote on a merger with Bryan Cave. And a federal appeals court says a New York judge had no power to rule in a case challenging D.C. gun regulations. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Covington & Burling offices under construction at 850 10th Streent, NW, inside the City Centre complex, on May 13, 2014.

Covington Dismissed From Contractors' Dispute Over Payment

By Katelyn Polantz |

Covington & Burling is now free from the controversies around the construction of its new Washington offices, after a judge dismissed the firm from being part of two contractors’ dispute over payments.

Visitors outside the U.S. Supreme Court on August 29, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Justices Split Over Arbitration | Texas Federal Judge Reprimanded

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Supreme Court's ideological blocs split on Monday in an arbitration decision. The justices also temporarily blocked an Alabama Supreme Court ruling denying a lesbian woman's parental rights. And a federal judge in Texas is reprimanded. This is a news roundup from NLJ and other publications.

Sam Feder.

Jenner & Block’s DC Office Gets New Managing Partner

By Katelyn Polantz |

Current managing partner David DeBruin hands the job to Samuel Feder, a telecommunications partner.

Morning Wrap: FIFA Probe Widens | $1 Trillion in Deals | Freddie Gray Judge in the Spotlight

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Media companies under scrutiny in FIFA probe, Justice Breyer on what it's like never being off-duty, and Skadden becomes first legal adviser to handle $1 trillion in deals in a single year.

Morning Wrap: Weil and Skadden on 'DowDuPont' $130B Deal | The Justices' Hot Mic

By C. Ryan Barber |

Dow and DuPont announce $130 billion merger that's likely to face major regulatory scrutiny. Weil Gotshal represents Dow in the deal, and Skadden Arps for DuPont. A hot mic captured what the justices thought about Supreme Court protesters earlier this year. And criticism of Justice Scalia's affirmative action remarks ramped up in the hours after argument this week. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Ex-Mayor Gray Cleared | Two Coups for Wilmer Hale

By Katelyn Polantz |

Federal investigations into local government and police departments are driving the news today, with a conclusion on the Vincent Gray probe in D.C. and a possible new client in Baltimore for Wilmer Hale: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Robert Bennett.

Hogan Lovells' Robert Bennett Cheers End of D.C. Election Investigation

By Zoe Tillman |

Hogan Lovells partner Robert Bennett reflected on the end of a years-long investigation into the 2010 mayoral election in Washington and the news that his client, former D.C. mayor Vincent Gray, won't face charges.

Marcia Coyle on PBS NewsHour: SCOTUS Weighs 'One Person, One Vote'

By Staff |

Marcia Coyle, senior Washington correspondent for The National Law Journal, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Gwen Ifill on Tuesday about the U.S. Supreme Court's arguments over the definition of "one person, one vote" in the case Evenwel v. Abbott.

Abigail Fisher, plaintiff in Fisher v. University of Texas, outside the U.S. Supreme Court in October 2012.

Morning Wrap: Affirmative Action Returns to SCOTUS | VW Cases Consolidated

By Mike Scarcella |

The Supreme Court takes a second look at the University of Texas' race-conscious admissions policy. Volkswagen emissions cases are consolidated in San Francisco federal district court. And Baltimore picked Wilmer Hale to aid the police department amid a federal investigation. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA).

Lawyers in House ACA Suit Tell Court to Keep Democrats Out of Case

By Mike Sacks |

The lawyers representing the House of Representatives in its suit against the Obama administration over the health care law oppose House Democrats from jumping into the case as a friend-of-the-court in support of the government. The House Democrats' proposed amicus brief, filed Tuesday in Washington federal district court, urges the judiciary to stay out of a dispute between the political branches.

Luis Felipe Restrepo during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in February 2013.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Declines Gun Case | Vote Urged on Third Circuit Nominee

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Supreme Court, over objections from Justices Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia, declines to take up a Chicago suburb's assault-weapon ban. The nomination of Luis Restrepo for a seat on the Third Circuit languishes. And General Electric, late in the game, pulls the plug on a deal to sell its appliance business to Electrolux. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Sandra Grossman, left, and Becki Young, right.

Four Maryland Immigration Lawyers Join Forces

By Katelyn Polantz |

Two corporate immigration attorneys and two family immigration lawyers have paired their Maryland partnerships in a client-referral arrangement. The strategic partnership, which the partners of Hammond Young Immigration Law of Silver Spring and Grossman Law of Bethesda announced Monday, brings together six lawyers for an all-female coalition.

Chief Justice John Roberts at New York University School of Law in November.

Chief Justice Roberts Won’t Intervene in Fight Over Judge in D.C. Gun Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. is staying out of a fight over whether a New York federal judge was properly assigned to a lawsuit challenging gun regulations in the District of Columbia.

U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Wrap: GE Deal Called Off | DOJ to Investigate Chicago PD | Stevens in the Spotlight

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: GE and Electrolux abandon $3.3 billion appliance deal, DOJ will launch a civil rights investigation in Chicago and a new documentary charts Justice John Paul Stevens' path to the bench.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch earlier this year in Washington.

Morning Wrap: Loretta Lynch Warns Against Anti-Muslim Backlash

By C. Ryan Barber |

Attorney General Loretta Lynch warns against anti-Muslim backlash in the United States. Coal baron Donald Blankenship of Massey Energy was convicted on a conspiracy charge at trial in West Virginia. And the Second Circuit rejects the computer hacking conviction of New York's one-time "cannibal cop." This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Joe Lieberman

Morning Wrap: Lieberman and Churchill | Goldstein’s Billing Rate | Kirkland Honored for Pro Bono

By Katelyn Polantz |

Former Sen. Joe Lieberman recognized, and the billing rate for Supreme Court litigator Tom Goldstein’s firm: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

U.S. Supreme Court

Morning Wrap: Immigration Ruling Still In Play This Term

By Mike Scarcella |

The U.S. Supreme Court could still rule this term on the Obama administration's immigration policies—if the justices take the case. The NYT looks at how racial tension on college campuses could play into the high court's affirmative action arguments next week. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Gifts for the Homeless accepts donations from DLA Piper during 2014's holiday drive.

Law Firms Unite for Clothing Drive to Aid Homeless

By Tony Mauro |

More than 100 law firms and law-related organizations are gearing up this week for the annual drive that will bring an estimated 4,000 bags of used clothing, blankets and other items to nearly 70 homeless shelters in the Washington area. The effort is sponsored by Gifts for the Homeless, founded in 1986 by law firms, legal departments and law-related businesses. It is the legal community's only coordinated effort to aid the homeless.

FBI headquarters, Washington DC

Morning Wrap: A Secret Demand from the FBI | Airline Apologizes to Dallas Lawyer

By Mike Sacks |

Virgin America airlines prohibited prominent Dallas lawyer Robert "Bobby" Abtahi from boarding a flight home yesterday from New York. (The airline has apologized for a "misunderstanding.") The target of a a FBI national security letter is now allowed to speak about the secret demand from the feds. And a look at the lawyers in the VW emissions litigation. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Vote Counting Blocked | Lethal Injection Opposition | Gitmo Memo Revealed

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: The U.S. Supreme Court halts vote counting in Hawaii, a federal appeals judge sounds off on lethal injections, and a law school closes for the day due to a campus threat.

Squire Patton Boggs offices in Washington, D.C.

Two More Top Lobbyists to Leave Squire Patton Boggs

By Katelyn Polantz |

Lobbyist Kevin O'Neill, one of the highest-ranking legacy Patton Boggs partners at Squire Patton Boggs, will leave the firm along with two more of the firm's highest-profile lobbyists. The departures, like dozens over the past three years, highlight how few of the old Patton Boggs has stuck with the global firm as it attempts to rebuild its lobbying capabilities. Arnold & Porter snagged the trio of lobbyists.

Senate Confirms First DC Judges in More Than Two Years

By Zoe Tillman |

For the first time in 2 1/2 years, the U.S. Senate last week confirmed judges to the District of Columbia Superior Court, signaling a renewed focus on local judicial vacancies. The judges were confirmed on Nov. 19. Earlier this month, former D.C. attorney general Irvin Nathan, now a senior counsel to Arnold & Porter, wrote letters to Senate leadership lamenting the delays on behalf of the Council for Court Excellence.

(l-r) Justices Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Sonia Sotomayor, during an event held at the National Museum of Women in the Arts honoring Justice O'Connor with the Seneca Women Global Leadership Award. April 15, 2015.

Ranking the Top Ten Female Justices (When There Are Only Four)

By Tony Mauro |

When the invitation went out recently from the Green Bag law journal to come up with new "top ten" rankings for the U.S. Supreme Court, Meg Penrose leapt at the chance to rate the court's female justices. Never mind that only four women have ever sat on the high court. Penrose, a professor at Texas A&M University School of Law, used the listing to underscore the dearth of female justices through history.

Judge Royce Lamberth of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Morning Wrap: A Judge's Guantanamo Criticism | Tweeting-Lawyer Awaits Possible Sanction

By Mike Scarcella |

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth questions the government over delays in reviewing Gitmo cases. A Barnes & Thornburg partner apologizes for tweeting photos from a federal trial—and now awaits a possible sanction. And an anonymous jury will sit in the Freddie Gray case in Baltimore. This is a daily roundup from ALM and other publications.

Richard Posner.

Morning Wrap: Wisconsin Abortion Law Fails | New Report on Minority GCs

By Mike Sacks |

The Seventh Circuit finds Wisconsin abortion law unconstitutional. The Minority Corporate Counsel Association releases its annual general counsel survey of Fortune 500 companies. A federal appeals court says various Justice Department memos about the lawfulness of drone strikes against Americans can remain secret. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: 'Law Guys' | Journalist Sentenced | Uber Settles

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A look at the "law guys" in the Sheldon Silver corruption trial, journalist Jason Rezaian was reportedly sentenced to prison in Iran, and Uber agrees to a million-dollar settlement over airport fees.

Harvard Law School Library in Langdell Hall.

Morning Wrap: Vandalism at Harvard Law | Fantasy Sports Regs Pursued

By C. Ryan Barber |

The Harvard University police are investigating as a hate crime the placement of black tape over the portraits of some African American faculty at Harvard Law School. The Massachusetts attorney general will propose regulations for the fantasy sports industry. And a case concerning law school debt reaches the U.S. Supreme Court. This is a daily roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Law Firms Excel With Pro-LGBT Policies | D.C. Firms Host Charity Events This Week

By Katelyn Polantz |

Firms cheer the release of Human Rights Campaign’s annual corporate equality index on policies for LGBT employees, LegalZoom expands into North Carolina, and Texas executes a death row inmate. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Blake Farenthold.

Texas Congressman's Office Resolves Ex-Hill Aide's Retaliation Suit

By Mike Sacks |

A sex discrimination and retaliation lawsuit in Washington that a former congressional staffer filed against the office of Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, ended Wednesday. Farenthold's office and Lauren Greene, the plaintiff, agreed to dismiss the case after several months of court-facilitated mediation, according to papers filed jointly in Washington's federal trial court.

Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Morning Wrap: Kagan Says Scalia's 'Historic' | Sotomayor's Regrets

By Compiled by The National Law Journal |

Justice Antonin Scalia will "go down as one of the most important, most historic figures on the court," Justice Elena Kagan says. Meanwhile, Justice Sonia Sotomayor regrets not being a law clerk. And a federal jury resumes deliberations Wednesday in the conspiracy trial of a former energy executive in West Virginia. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building in Washington, D.C. September 4, 2014. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: Congress Ordered to Cooperate With SEC | Paul Ryan's GC

By Mike Sacks |

Congress must cooperate with a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission subpoena, a Manhattan judge rules. The D.C. Circuit refuses to stop the NSA's bulk collection of phone records, a program that's set to expire at the end of the month. And House Speaker Paul Ryan picks a veteran Capitol Hill lawyer as his next general counsel. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Mark Epley.

Paul Ryan Picks Veteran House Lawyer as General Counsel

By Mike Sacks |

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, has selected the Ways and Means Committee's top lawyer to become general counsel of the speaker's office. Mark Epley has spent the last 3 1/2 years as general counsel and oversight staff director at Ways and Means. Epley's legal career included stints at the U.S. Justice Department and as an associate at Hunton & Williams.

Morning Wrap: Hogan Lawyer Killed in Paris | Education Settlement | FEC Stalemate

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Hogan Lovells mourns the death of an associate killed in the Paris attacks, the FEC can't reach a decision on super PAC issues and five more Guantanamo Bay detainees are released.

Grant & Eisenhofer Settles Claims Against Former Firm Attorneys

By Zoe Tillman |

Plaintiffs firm Grant & Eisenhofer has settled a lawsuit against former attorneys at the firm who were accused of scheming to steal clients and cut the firm out of money it was owed.

Morning Wrap: EPA Administrator Must Sit For Depo | Death Challenge Fails

By C. Ryan Barber |

Gina McCarthy, the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, must sit for a deposition in an energy company's federal suit in West Virginia. The Ninth Circuit rules against a challenge to California's death penalty system. And prosecutors seek a 12.5-year prison sentence for Jared Fogle, the former Subway pitchman. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Jacqueline Berrien.

Morning Wrap: Deaths of ‘Poor Joshua’ and Jacqueline Berrien

By Katelyn Polantz and Marcia Coyle |

In memoriam of civil rights attorney and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission chair Jacqueline Berrien and of Joshua DeShaney, he of the “Poor Joshua!” Supreme Court dissent. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell of the Criminal Division at the U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Lifelines | DOJ Reviews Foreign-Bribery Cases

By Mike Scarcella |

The NLJ's Supreme Court Brief looks at those moments when justices toss lifelines to advocates during arguments. The Justice Department is working on a new policy that could lower the number of foreign-bribery cases the government brings against companies. Arent Fox is set to name a new managing partner. And the feds say they will take the Fifth Circuit's immigration ruling to the Supreme Court. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

A U.S. Border Patrol officer sits in his vehicle, surveying the steel beam border fence overlooking the town of Nogales, Arizona.

Republicans Laud Immigration Ruling, Democrats Denounce as 'Dangerous'

By Mike Sacks |

As Senate Republican and Democratic leaders on Tuesday took opposing views of Monday night's federal appeals court decision blocking President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration, those Republicans who had pushed for reform sent more nuanced messages.

Judge Jerry Smith of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. (2009.)

Morning Wrap: Fifth Circuit Rules Against Obama Immigration Program

By Mike Sacks |

The Fifth Circuit deals a significant blow to the Obama administration's immigration action. A Chicago law partner who took photos at a trial, and tweeted the images, is in trouble with the judge. A Washington judge rules for a second time against the NSA's bulk collection of American's phone records. This is a daily news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Judge Expresses Frustration Over How DC Circuit Handled NSA Case

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington expressed frustration Monday with how the D.C. Circuit handled a suit over the NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records. Leon ruled in 2013 against the NSA, and he said he was "optimistic" the appeals court would act "expeditiously" in hearing the dispute and issuing a decision. "For reasons unknown to me," Leon said Monday, "it did not." The appeals court earlier this year sent the case back to Leon for further proceedings, but did not reach the merit. The call collection program is set to end this month under the USA Freedom Act.

Morning Wrap: Lawyer Charged | Death Penalty Abolitionists | Fighting Mass Incarceration

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A former Bryan Cave partner faces criminal charges, a special report on judges' financial reports, a look at the lawyers fighting the death penalty and an inquiry into a general counsel's licensing status.

Sister Loraine Marie Maguire, of Little Sisters of the Poor, speaks to members of the media after attending a hearing in the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in Denver, Colorado, on December 8, 2014.

Supreme Court To Hear Cases From Religious Foes of Contraception

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear religious nonprofit organizations' claims to an outright exemption from providing their female employees with contraceptive health insurance under the federal Affordable Care Act.

David Dekker.

Q&A: Pillsbury's Dekker on His Howrey Days, the Role of a D.C. Office

By Katelyn Polantz |

Chair-elect David Dekker spoke with the NLJ about his firm's characterizations—especially in the press—and challenges regarding growth, possible mergers and an aging partnership. His term as chair will move Pillsbury's leadership to D.C. and marks an unusual ascent of a recent lateral to a major firmwide position.

Sonia Sotomayor.

Morning Wrap: Remembering Freshfields' Tim Coleman | Sotomayor Gets Personal

By C. Ryan Barber |

Prosecution star, prankster, private practice: Remembering Tim Coleman, the Freshfields partner who died Tuesday after falling from a building in downtown Washington. Justice Sonia Sotomayor gets personal—on the bench. And nearly 100,000 same-sex couples have wed since the Supreme Court's landmark marriage ruling in late June. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr., now back at his former firm Covington & Burling.

Eric Holder Urges 'Bold' Action on Sentencing Reform

By C. Ryan Barber |

Former Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. on Thursday pressed for action on criminal justice reform during a lecture in Washington, telling an audience here that Congress should seize on rare bipartisan consensus to change sentencing laws. The Covington & Burling partner delivered the seventh annual Judge Thomas A. Flannery Lecture.

Paul Ryan.

Paul Ryan Names D.C. Lawyer to Political Team

By Mike Sacks |

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, has named his longtime friend and campaign lawyer Tim Kronquist as general counsel to Team Ryan, the speaker's political operation. Kronquist, who has been friends with Ryan since elementary school in Wisconsin, served as counsel to the new speaker's 2012 vice presidential campaign and has been the congressman's lawyer since 1998.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Hears Gerrymandering Case | Dinsmore & Shohl Heads West

By Katelyn Polantz |

We also bring you interviews with a firm that specializes in arbitration and with LeClairRyan’s founder: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Wade Henderson, president & CEO of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, outside the U.S. Supreme Court, the day the court issued its decision on the Voting Rights Act case, striking down one of its key provisions.  June 25, 2013.

Wade Henderson, Longtime Civil Rights Strategist, to Step Down

By Tony Mauro |

Wade Henderson, one of Washington's leading civil rights advocates and strategists, is retiring next year after 20 years as president and chief executive officer of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.

Visitors outside the U.S. Supreme Court on August 29, 2015.

Morning Wrap: A Law Student Who's Set Apart | 'Love Your Lawyer' Day

By Mike Scarcella |

The U.S. Supreme Court today hears an election law suit first filed by an American University law student named Stephen Shapiro. Lawyers push back at all the negativity about their profession. The Washington Redskins get dirty in their opening brief in the Fourth Circuit. And a federal immigration judge settles her suit against the Justice Department. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Demonstrations outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges.

Morning Wrap: Ohio's $1.3M Gay-Marriage Tab | Cosby Redux

By Mike Sacks |

Ohio will pay $1.3 million in legal fees to the lawyers who represented James Obergefell in landmark same-sex marriage litigation. Bill Cosby will give a new deposition in the defamation case. And the justices throw a curveball to the lawyers in a Georgia death penalty case. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Detroit Tigers Starting pitcher Alfredo Simon (31)  delivers a pitch during the fourth inning of the game between the Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field in Cleveland, OH.  September 10, 2015.

Pro Baseball Player Settles Rape Suit For $150K

By Zoe Tillman |

Professional baseball player Alfredo Simon Cabrera will pay $150,000 to settle a civil lawsuit brought by a woman who accused him of rape. The settlement ends an inquiry into text messages sent by the judge's law clerk.

Morning Wrap: Arbitration Everywhere | Inmate Release | 'Rough Justice' in D.C.

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: exploring companies' use of arbitration clauses in consumer contracts, Obama wants to 'ban the box' and the release of federal inmates under new sentencing guidelines.

(Clockwise from left)  Sarah Greenfield, Shagufa Hossain, Leakhena Mom, and Andrea A. Ramezan-Jackson.

Four Women and No Men, a Big Law Anomaly, Make Partner at Latham

By Katelyn Polantz |

The new partner class in D.C. at Latham & Watkins looks different than it did last year. The firm promoted four women to the partnership here this month—and no men. Latham's new partners in Washington this year are litigator Sarah Greenfield, corporate lawyers Shagufa Hossain and Leakhena Mom and tax lawyer Andrea Ramezan-Jackson.

<b>HOME:</b> Covington is

Morning Wrap: Eric Holder Questions Connecticut's New Gaming Law

By C. Ryan Barber |

Covington partner Eric Holder Jr. has concerns about Connecticut's new gaming law. Lawyers question whether Dennis Hastert, the former Dickstein lobbyist and House speaker, got a sweetheart deal. And the Fourth Circuit Court grants the government's petition to rehear a case on whether and how the Fourth Amendment applies to the collection of cell-site records. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Thurgood Marshall Academy eleventh grader Phillonda Williams explains her reasoning on a budgeting activity during a tutoring session with Blank Rome lawyers and staff this week.

High School Students Learn Finesse of Lawyering from Washington's Top Litigators

By Katelyn Polantz |

Blank Rome's tutor relationship with Thurgood Marshall Academy in Washington began in January. Now the attorneys have bonded with a second set of students. In addition to Blank Rome, firms such as Jenner & Block, Crowell & Moring and Vinson & Elkins have been involved in the program for more than a decade, from the first years of the school when it was originally located in a church in Congress Heights. Clifford Chance also pitched in often, tutoring and in helping to paint classrooms.

The Washington Council of Lawyers created these Halloween puns to promote DC Pro Bono Week on social media sites.

Morning Wrap: D.C. Pro Bono Week Prompts Low Bono Firm Ribbon-Cutting, Social Media Campaigns, Dress-Down Friday

By Katelyn Polantz |

D.C. Pro Bono week will conclude with a “Go Casual for Justice” fundraiser at firms across the city: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Rendering of the D.C. Bar's new future headquarters.

D.C. Bar Plans to Build a $70M New Headquarters

By Zoe Tillman |

The D.C. Bar will pay an estimated $70 million to build a 100,000-square-foot building in downtown Washington to serve at its new home.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her daughter, Professor Jane Ginsburg of Columbia Law School (to her immediate right), were recognized Tuesday night as ChIPs Hall of Fame honorees. ChIPs works to recognize women in intellectual property law.

Ginsburg Accepts Her Cultural Brand at Dinner Honoring Her Work

By Katelyn Polantz |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has an admission to make: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is sharper at intellectual property law than he is. "My judgment is often guided considerably by Ruth," Scalia said in a tribute video for Ginsburg shown Tuesday night at a dinner hosted by the ChIPs organization for female IP lawyers. This was ChIPs' 10th anniversary celebrating women who work in intellectual property and technology.

J. Dennis Hastert.

Morning Wrap: Hastert Heads to Court to Plead Guilty

By Mike Scarcella |

Former Dickstein Shapiro lobbyist Dennis Hastert, the ex-House speaker, heads to court today in Chicago to plead guilty in a federal prosecution. A Washington federal judge doubles down on ordering the government to publicly disclose a set of videos from the Guantanamo Bay detention center. And the NFL, represented by Bancroft, presses its Deflategate challenge in the Second Circuit. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Christina Storm.

'Lawyers Without Borders' Partners With Big Law in New D.C. Operation

By Katelyn Polantz |

Lawyers Without Borders Inc., the U.S.-based rule-of-law advocacy group, has opened a bureau in Washington, where it can base some operations and develop relationships with underwriters, with its subcontractors and with partners in the legal community. "In the rule of law sector, having a presence in Washington has really improved our relationships," Christina Storm, the group's executive director and founder, said.

Jason Chaffetz, left, and Elijah Cummings, right.

Missed Deadline Dooms Subpoenas for Congressmen’s Testimony

By Zoe Tillman |

Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Maryland, will not have to testify at the trial of a District of Columbia man charged in connection with a protest at a congressional hearing.

Erin Murphy, with Bancroft colleagues Paul Clement and Michael McGinley, are representing the NFL in its

Morning Wrap: Bancroft Joins NFL Defense in 'Deflategate' Appeal | Pro Bono Week

By Mike Sacks |

The NFL, with its new defense team from Bancroft in Washington, files its opening brief in the Tom Brady "Deflategate" scandal now in the Second Circuit. A federal judge mulls whether to force Apple Inc. to unlock a phone for the feds. And it's Pro Bono Week. Read highlights from the NLJ's coverage here. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Morning Wrap: 'Notorious RBG' | Lawyer v. Machine | Paul Ryan to Hire Lobbyist

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Rep. Paul Ryan wants Squire Patton Boggs lobbyist to be his chief of staff, a review of the new 'Notorious RBG' book and major broadband providers face scrutiny over claims of fast Internet connections.

(l-r) Cornelia Pillard, Janice Rogers Brown, and Brett Kavanaugh.

D.C. Circuit Divides Over American's Claims of Torture Overseas

By Zoe Tillman |

An American citizen’s claim that the FBI detained and tortured him overseas spurred sharp disagreement on a federal appeals panel over the role of the judiciary to review U.S. counterterrorism efforts.

Law Firm Can Keep $270K Fee Award for $70K Judgment, D.C. Circuit Says

By Zoe Tillman |

A boutique law firm in Washington can keep nearly $270,000 in legal fees after winning a $70,000 judgment against a former client, a federal appeals court in Washington ruled on Friday.

Williams & Connolly attorney David Kendall, left, sits behind former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a House hearing of the Select Committee on Benghazi, on Thursday, October 22, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Clinton's Entourage | Insider Trading Charges Dropped

By Mike Scarcella |

Hillary Clinton spends 11 hours on the Hill. Preet Bharara drops insider trading charges. Northwestern Law has a new name after a major donation. And Pinterest loses a trademark spat with a rival startup. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Kristen Clarke.

Civil Rights Legal Group Picks New President

By Tony Mauro |

Kristen Clarke, a civil rights lawyer for the New York Attorney General's office, will become the new president and executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Clarke will begin her new position on Jan. 1, succeeding longtime president Barbara Arnwine.

Morning Wrap: No More Law for State AG | Flute Notes Ok in Song for Jay Z | Lots of Firms Want to Grow in IP

By Katelyn Polantz |

Stories on Covington partner Keir Gumbs and academic Lisa Fairfax, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, Sheriff Joe Arpaio and Jay Z: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

The late Griffin Bell, U.S. Attorney General under President Jimmy Carter, founded King & Spalding’s Washington office in 1979.

How King & Spalding Built Its D.C. Office From One AG to a Team of 200

By Katelyn Polantz |

Long considered one of the elite Atlanta-based firms, King & Spalding's D.C. reputation has been understated because of its fewer number of lawyers and smaller congressional lobbying totals, especially compared to Washington-founded firms. But the firm has remained a major player in D.C.-focused areas.

Reggie Walton.

Inquiry of D.C. Law Clerk’s 'Ill-Advised' Text Messages Not Over

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton in Washington this month rejected calls to step down from a case after his law clerk sent "ill-advised" text messages to a lawyer who was involved in the litigation. A different judge in Walton's court, U.S. District Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle, is continuing the inquiry.

U.S. Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia (2011)

Morning Wrap: The Justices' Dissents | Inside the Dewey Deliberations

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Scalia on Tuesday reiterates his prediction that he won't be surprised if the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down the death penalty. President Obama picks George Washington University Law School professor Lisa Fairfax for a slot on the SEC. And jurors recount their deliberations in the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Venable Settles $300K Fee Fight with Former Client

By Zoe Tillman |

Venable has reached a confidential settlement with a former client that the firm accused of failing to pay more than $300,000 in legal fees.

Chris Van Hollen.

Congressman Presses Challenge to Political Speech Rules in D.C. Circuit

By Zoe Tillman |

As the 2016 election season ramps up, a federal appeals court in Washington is considering when unions and corporations, including many nonprofits, must disclose donors whose money is used to pay for political ads.

Steven Davis, left, and Stephen DiCarmine, right, leave the courtroom after the mistrial in the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial. Oct. 19, 2015. Attorney Austin Campriello is in the center.

Morning Wrap: Dewey Mistrial | No Quick Appeal for Feds in Health Care Suit

By Mike Sacks |

A mistrial in the case of three former leaders of Dewey & LeBoeuf. A judge denies an immediate government appeal in the House's health care spending lawsuit. And a federal appeals court upholds New York gun regulations. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

How Large are the Public-Policy Practices Within Law Firms?

By Katelyn Polantz |

Today we published our annual survey on public policy practices in Washington, the Influence 50. One of our most surprising results was the number of law firms that counted almost $100 million or more in revenue from work intended to influence federal policy.

Morning Wrap: Influence 50 | Wal-Mart Probe Fizzles | 'Goodfella' Stands Trial

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: The NLJ's annual report on the lobbying industry, a high-profile federal probe into Wal-Mart comes to a close and Larry Lessig is still running for president.

Roger Adelman.

Hinckley Prosecutor Roger Adelman Mourned by D.C. Judges and Lawyers

By Zoe Tillman |

The D.C. legal community on Oct. 13 filled the ceremonial courtroom at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse downtown to remember Roger Adelman, a longtime federal prosecutor, private practice lawyer and law professor who died last month.

Justice Stephen Breyer on Capitol Hill in 2012.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Stock Conflict | Hastert's Plea Deal

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Stephen Breyer had an apparent stock conflict in this week’s energy case at the Supreme Court. Dennis Hastert will plead guilty. The feds take on the Sidley Austin team representing Jill Kelley in her privacy suit tied to the David Petraeus scandal. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: This Week in Sensational Litigation

By Katelyn Polantz |

Cases on a shipwreck, a public park and a birthday party: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Catherine Robb.

LBJ's Granddaughter Sworn in to Supreme Court Bar

By Tony Mauro |

It was a throwback moment at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday when Catherine Robb, the granddaughter of the late president Lyndon Johnson, was admitted to the court's bar. Her father Charles Robb, the former governor and U.S. senator from Virginia, moved her admission.

Joel Sanders, Steven Davis and Stephen DiCarmine leave court on Tuesday

Morning Wrap: Suit Against NYPD Spying is Revived | Dewey Deliberations

By Mike Scarcella |

An appeals court revives a civil rights suit against the NYPD over a surveillance program that targeted Muslims. The jury in the Dewey trial in Manhattan delivers another partial verdict. And Covington's Timothy Hester will continue to serve as the firm's chairman. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Proposed design for Steptoe & Johnson's future two-story lobby, part of a full office renovation that will take place at their current Connecticut Avenue address in Washington, D.C.

Steptoe Joins D.C. Law Firms That Chose to Stay Put

By Katelyn Polantz |

Another law firm has chosen to forgo packing up and starting anew. After a three-year-long real estate search, Steptoe & Johnson LLP says it has re-signed its lease for another 15 years. It has been in the building on Connecticut Avenue near Dupont Circle for 30 years.

Morning Wrap: Journalist Convicted in Iran | Justice's Bust Defaced | Twitter GC Pulls Double Duty

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the rocky road ahead for shareholders suing VW, a former chief justice's bust is defaced and a journalist accused of espionage in Iran is convicted.

J. Dennis Hastert, former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, speaking at the NLJ's regulatory summit in December.

Morning Wrap: Hastert's Decision | Sentencing at SCOTUS

By Mike Sacks |

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert faces a Tuesday deadline for pretrial motions in the criminal case against him in Chicago. Time Magazine publishes the best and worst Supreme Court decisions. The Supreme Court is set to review a dispute over life without parole sentences for juvenile offenders. This is a roundup from ALM and other news sites.

Morning Wrap: Copyright Does Not Extend to Yoga | Michigan's SSM Legal Tab

By Mike Scarcella |

A federal appeals court says yoga can't be copyrighted. Michigan agrees to pay nearly $2 million in legal fees to the challengers of the state's same-sex marriage ban. And a court says the company that holds the rights "Santa Claus is Coming to Town" will lose ownership next year. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Rodney Abstone II.

D.C. Draws New Consulting Firm From Chicago

By Katelyn Polantz |

Where the legal market grows, consulting firms will follow. AbstoneLalley Inc., a 14-person legal consulting company based in Chicago, has opened an office in Washington, the firm said this week.

(l-r) Gabe Roth, Executive Director of Fix the Court, Gregg Leslie, Legal Defense Director for Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, and representatives Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Mike Quigley (D-IL), and Gerry Connolly (D-VA), hold a press conference outside the U.S. Supreme Court Building to introduce the bipartisan Eyes on the Courts Act, which would require cameras in the Supreme Court and at all federal appellate courts.  October 8, 2015.

Legislators Make Another Run at Cameras in the Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

A bipartisan group of members of Congress on Thursday introduced the latest bill aimed at requiring the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal appeals courts to allow broadcast and video coverage of their proceedings. "How is it possible that we can keep up with the Kardashians, but we cannot keep up with the Supreme Court?" Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-New York, asked at a press conference on the sidewalk in front of the court.

Hillary Clinton.

D.C. Court Won't Appoint Judge to Coordinate Clinton Email Searches

By Zoe Tillman |

The federal district court in Washington on Thursday denied the U.S. Department of State's request to appoint a single judge to oversee issues related to the search of Hillary Clinton’s emails and the emails of her former aides.

Steven Davis, Joel Sanders and Stephen DiCarmine leave the courtroom yesterday after jurors acquitted them on some counts.

Morning Wrap: What's Next for Dewey & LeBoeuf defendants?

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Dewey & LeBoeuf trial limps toward the finish with a partial acquittal. Will the jury hang? This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Morning Wrap: The 'Intensity' of Arguing in High Court | Dewey Deadlock | Goodbye, Mandatory Arbitration?

By Mike Scarcella |

Reflections from a King & Spalding associate on his first argument in the Supreme Court. The D.C. Circuit clears a path for U.S. District Judge Richard Leon to again rule against the feds in a suit over NSA surveillance. The jury in the Dewey & LeBouef trial is struggling to reach a verdict. And a consumer agency wants to make it easier to bring class actions against financial firms. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Justice Anthony Kennedy

NLJ Correspondents Preview the Supreme Court Term

By Mike Scarcella |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's senior Washington correspondent, spoke Monday night with PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff about the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court term. NLJ's congressional correspondent, Mike Sacks, offered his assessment on the term during an appearance on "The Morning Briefing with Tim Farley" on Sirius XM's POTUS channel.

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. March 4, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: Supreme Court to Spotlight Changes to Opinions

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Supreme Court will highlight revisions in already-published opinions, and the court confronts complaints about line-standing. The feds ink a record $20 billion settlement with BP over the April 2010 oil disaster. And Pillsbury's chairman-elect talks about the firm's plans. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Watch C-SPAN's Q&A With Tony Mauro

By Mike Scarcella |

C-SPAN on Sunday broadcast a "Q&A" interview with National Law Journal Supreme Court correspondent Tony Mauro in connection with a series that begins tonight on 12 landmark high court decisions through history. Mauro wrote Landmark Cases, a companion book to the series.

Morning Wrap: Back to Business at High Court | 'Guantánamo North'

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the U.S. Supreme Court returns to the bench, Hillary Clinton announces her gun control plan and the Pentagon searches for a new site for Guantánamo Bay detainees.

Visitors outside the U.S. Supreme Court on August 29, 2015.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Docket Grows | Law Clerk's 'Senseless' Text Messages

By Mike Scarcella |

A Washington federal judge calls his law clerk’s text messages to a lawyer in a pending case "regrettable" and "senseless." The justices on Thursday tacked on 13 more cases to this term's docket. Virginia carried out the execution of a convicted serial killer. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Shirley Sherrod.

Former USDA Official Settles Defamation Suit Against Breitbart Estate

By Zoe Tillman |

Former U.S. Department of Agriculture official Shirley Sherrod has settled her long-running defamation lawsuit against the late conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart.

Reggie Walton.

Judge Won’t Recuse Over Law Clerk’s 'Regrettable' Text Messages

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton in Washington has denied a request to step down from a case amid a dispute over "ill-advised" text messages his law clerk sent to a lawyer involved.

Morning Wrap: What the NCAA and Players’ Lawyer Said After Ruling | Why Richard Glossip Was Spared From Lethal Injection Yesterday

By Katelyn Polantz |

An appeals court rules on the NCAA v. player-athletes dispute, Oklahoma halts a death row execution, and Microsoft and Google settle their differences over patents: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Pope Francis in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 24 outside St. Patrick's Church in downtown.

Morning Wrap: Sanctioned for a Deposition | 'Harangues' at SCOTUS | Secret Visit With Pope

By Mike Scarcella |

Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk who refused to sign same-sex marriage certificates, met secretly with Pope Francis during his Washington visit. A Washington judge weighs a constitutional challenge brought by Supreme Court protesters. And the D.C. Circuit upholds the SEC's administrative venue. This is a roundup from ALM and other news sources.

U.S. Supreme Court.  June 29, 2015.

Supreme Court Protesters Take First Amendment Challenge to Court

By Zoe Tillman |

Can a whisper be disruptive? When does speech become loud? A federal district judge in Washington considered those questions on Tuesday in a constitutional challenge to a ban on protest activity at the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jason Chaffetz, left, and Elijah Cummings, right.

Chaffetz, Cummings Fight Activist's Subpoena for Trial Testimony

By Zoe Tillman |

Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Maryland, are fighting efforts to force them to testify at the trial of a D.C. man charged in connection with a protest at a congressional hearing.

Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison offices in Washington, D.C. March 24, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: From Treasury to Paul Weiss | Pillsbury's Next Chairman | Hastert's Talks

By Mike Sacks |

Roberto Gonzalez, a top Treasury Department lawyer, joins Paul Weiss in D.C. Pillsbury elects D.C. lawyer David Dekker as the firm's next chairman. And Sen. Robert Menendez loses the bulk of his challenge to public corruption charges. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Douglas Kendall, founder of the Constitutional Accountability Center.

Doug Kendall, Visionary Progressive Lawyer, Dies at 51

By Tony Mauro |

Doug Kendall, who founded the Constitutional Accountability Center seven years ago and built it into an influential counterweight to conservative legal thinking, died on Sept. 26 at age 51. The cause was colon cancer, according to an announcement by the Washington-based organization.

Morning Wrap: Overloaded Federal Courts | Mourning a Progressive Pioneer | Grand Jury Subpoena Fight

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Mourning the passing of Constitutional Accountability Center founder Doug Kendall, hot issues that could come before the high court this term and delays in overloaded federal courts.

Kevin McCarthy.

Speaker Transition Doesn't Put K Street Off-Kilter

By Katelyn Polantz |

It's steady as she goes around K Street despite the surprise resignation of House Speaker John Boehner from Congress. Several lobbyists and law firm leaders Friday afternoon indicated they're already thinking through a transition of power to Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Others said they felt unaffected by leadership turmoil.

Pope Francis departs in his Fiat 500L after visiting St. Patrick church and Catholic Charities, and meeting with Catholic Charities’ services recipients, during his trip to Washington, D.C., on Thursday, September 24, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Alito Says No Cameras | Court Rules for Password Protections

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Samuel Alito Jr. comments on a now-classic YouTube clip of the justices: "I got the best dog." Pope Francis is popemobiling around Manhattan now after calling for an end to the death penalty. A Pennsylvania federal trial judge says the government can't force a person to disclose a password for a smartphone. And election law experts question whether a Donald Trump cease-and-desist order, written on his company's letterhead, ran afoul of federal election rules. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Pope Francis greets nuns of the Little Sisters of the Poor order during a private meeting at their convent, in Washington, on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015.

Pope's Visit Boosts Little Sisters' Supreme Court Challenge

By Tony Mauro |

Pope Francis made an unscheduled visit Wednesday night to the Little Sisters of the Poor with the aim of showing support for the group's battle against the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Morning Wrap: A PillBourne or ChadBury Merger in the Works | White House Challenges Forward Movement of Another Health Care Suit

By Katelyn Polantz |

Some law firms see lateral movement and merger talks, several celebrities lawyer up, and our collection of coverage as Pope Francis traverses downtown: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Morning Wrap: 'Happy Birthday' Copyright Blown Out | 'Pope' at SCOTUS Oral Arguments

By Mike Scarcella |

A California federal judge rejects copyright claims over the song "Happy Birthday to You." A Wyoming judge denies an energy company's request to remove song mining-protest song lyrics from court records. And a Washington judge scolds the feds in a Hillary Clinton public records case. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Dentons' $10M Legal Fee Suit Against Republic of Guinea to Proceed

By Zoe Tillman |

The Republic of Guinea must face allegations in a U.S. court that it failed to pay the law firm Dentons more than $10 million in legal fees, a federal district judge in Washington ruled on Tuesday.

Former FBI Deputy General Counsel Joins Orrick's Supreme Court Group

By Marcia Coyle |

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe has added former FBI deputy general counsel Thomas Bondy to its growing U.S. Supreme Court and appellate practice group. Bondy, a veteran of the U.S. Justice Department's appellate staff, joined the FBI in 2012 and oversaw the agency's nationwide civil litigation docket. At Main Justice, Bondy briefed more than a hundred cases in the federal appellate courts and the Supreme Court and argued dozens of appeals.

Justice Samuel Alito Jr. (2006)

Morning Wrap: VW's Deception | Alito's Criticism | DOJ's ACA Appeal

By Mike Sacks |

The Justice Department's moving to appeal the House Republicans' suit over health care spending. Justice Samuel Alito Jr. critiques his colleagues. And the legal fallout from Volkswagen's emissions deception mounts. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

State Dept. Clashes with Ted Olson in Clinton Emails Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Lawyers for the U.S. State Department on Monday clashed with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher partner Ted Olson, who recently accused the agency of disobeying court orders in a lawsuit over records related to Hillary Clinton's tenure as secretary of state. "The Department of State is not a for-profit law firm whose clients are billed for services rendered," Justice Department lawyers wrote in papers responding to Olson's claims.

Justice Samuel Alito speaking during the Federalist Society’s 2015 Texas Chapters Conference in Dallas, Texas, on Saturday, September 19.

Justice Alito Critiques Supreme Court Colleagues

By Tony Mauro |

"Last term was a term in which the court followed what Humpty Dumpty famously said: 'When I use a word ... it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less,'" Justice Samuel Alito Jr. said at a recent Federalist Society event in Texas. Alito said the term was a "very bad term for textualism," referring mainly to the 6-3 ruling that rescued the Affordable Care Act from an interpretation that might have wrecked it.

James Bishop.

Papal Visit Opens Arms at Pro Bono Clinic

By Katelyn Polantz |

This week, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington expects business as usual in its pro bono law intake center before and after Pope Francis drops by on Thursday. Still, the attention of the coming papal visit has boosted the legal services group in recent weeks.

Morning Wrap: D.C. Preps for the Pope | Bar Exam Scores to Drop

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: firms and courts in D.C. brace for the pope to arrive, a preview of the expected drop in bar exam scores and who represents America's largest companies.

Morning Wrap: 'Reprehensible' Judicial Conduct | Privacy in the Fourth Circuit | ACA Circuit Split

By Mike Sacks |

The Judicial Conference publicly censures former Alabama federal district judge Mark Fuller over "reprehensible" conduct. Federal prosecutors are challenging a Fourth Circuit ruling that says the government needs a warrant to obtain cell-site location information from a service provider. And the Eighth Circuit creates a split over the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate. This is a daily roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Catherine Duval.

State Dept. Lawyer in Clinton Email Probe Joins Zuckerman Spaeder

By Katelyn Polantz |

Catherine Duval, a U.S. State Department lawyer who played a lead role in Hillary Clinton's ongoing email releases to Congress, has left the government to join the corporate and litigation firm Zuckerman Spaeder. Duval last worked in private practice as an associate and then counsel at Williams & Connolly from 2004 to 2013.

Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building in Washington, D.C.

Federal Judiciary Revises Disciplinary Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

The federal judiciary's policymaking arm on Thursday adopted changes to the disciplinary rules to make clear that a judge cannot interfere with misconduct investigations by retaliating against complainants or refusing to cooperate.

Tweeting the U.S. Constitution on its 228th Birthday

By Tony Mauro |

A D.C. organization dedicated to spreading the word about the U.S. Constitution is tweeting out the entire text in 325 140-character segments today to mark the document’s 228th birthday.

Morning Wrap: GM Makes Deal with DOJ | Menendez in Court | Ahmed Needs a Lawyer

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Justice Department has reached an agreement with General Motors over its handling of an ignition-switch defect. Quinn Emanuel & Sullivan picks a fight with big banks, Sen. Bob Mendendez fights back against his indictment and jurors are deciding on the Dewey & LeBoeuf administrators’ fates: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Andrew Ceresney.

Federal Agency Lawyers Caution Senate About Electronic Privacy Changes

By Mike Sacks |

Any changes to the 1986 law that protects the privacy of electronic communications must preserve the ability of federal agencies to fully conduct civil investigations, lawyers from the federal trade and securities commissions told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday.

Mayer Brown offices in Washington.

Fees Denied To Firm in Lobby Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

Lobbyists who sued the Obama administration over its ban on lobbyists serving on federal agency advisory committees are not entitled to legal fees, a federal judge in Washington ruled this week.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Morning Wrap: Execution Day in Oklahoma | Mark Cuban v. the SEC

By Mike Scarcella |

Richard Glossip, the Oklahoma death-row prisoner whose challenge the justices rejected this past term, is set to be executed Wednesday in Oklahoma. A Connecticut man's obscene handwritten message on a speeding ticket is protected under the First Amendment. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban takes on the SEC in a new brief in the Eleventh Circuit. And the justices get a "back-to-SCOTUS" list. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Justices Get A 'Back-to-SCOTUS' List

By Marcia Coyle |

Parents struggle each year with ever growing "back-to-school lists." Now it's the Supreme Court's turn, says an organization that has mailed the justices a "back-to-SCOTUS" list to help them get into the swing of greater "transparency and accountability."

J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building.

Morning Wrap: Summer Associate Satisfaction Survey | Judge Lifts FBI Gag Order

By Mike Scarcella |

Kaye Scholer joined Boston-based Choate Hall & Stewart in a tie for first place in The American Lawyer's 2015 Summer Associate satisfaction survey. A federal judge lifts the FBI's gag order against an Internet service provider. Lawyers for the file-sharing website Megaupload press their forfeiture appeal in the Fourth Circuit. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Justice Stephen Breyer at a House hearing in March.

Breyer, Colbert Spar Over Cameras in Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer appeared on late night television Monday to promote his new book, but he ended up answering questions about cameras in the court and the collegiality of the justices. About a minute into the interview, Colbert asked Breyer why the court is "the last place where I couldn't bring my camera crew" to let the public see what is happening.

Morning Wrap: Justice Breyer Speaks | Rising Stars | Death Penalty on Life Support

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Breyer discusses his new book and life on the bench, D.C.'s rising stars and top congressional lawyers, and the challenges facing the death penalty.

(l-r) David Sentelle; Laurence Silberman, and Sri Srinivasan.

DOJ, Dutch Company Urge Court to Revive Settlement in Sanctions Case

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal appeals court on Friday weighed whether a trial judge abused his authority when he rejected a corporate settlement as too lenient—one day after the U.S. Department of Justice announced plans to take a tougher approach against white-collar crime.

Writer Sought to Record History of Veterans' Appeals Court

By Marcia Coyle |

The clamor for "Author! Author!" is not confined to the theater. A federal appeals court recently made the call for a writer to record the court's first 25 years in business. The U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims has put out a request for proposals for a "scholarly book on the history of the creation and the first 25 years" of the court.

Sally Yates, during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to be Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice. March 24, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Morning Wrap: The Yates Memo | Securities Whistleblowers

By Mike Sacks |

Reaction from federal judges and white-collar defenders to the Justice Department's new push to prosecute Wall Street executives. And the Second Circuit creates a split over whether whistleblowers reporting violations of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform law need to go to the Securities and Exchange Commission to be covered. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Visitors look through books before Russian President Vladimir Putin's visit to the library of the Schneerson family of Hasidic rabbis in the Jewish Museum in Moscow, Thursday, June 13, 2013. The vast collection of Jewish books and documents is the focus of a dispute between Moscow and Washington.

Russia Hit With $43M Sanction For Refusal to Return Jewish Books

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth in Washington entered a $43.7 million judgment against the Russian Federation on Thursday as a sanction for rebuffing an order to return thousands of Jewish religious texts seized in the early 20th century.

Richard Blumenthal.

Blumenthal: New DOJ White-Collar Guidelines are 'Important Step'

By Mike Sacks |

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Connecticut, who has advocated for tougher prosecution of corporate wrongdoing, called the U.S. Justice Department's new directive to focus on individuals an "important step" but not a final one.

Morning Wrap: New DOJ Guidelines on White Collar Crime

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Justice Department says it will launch a full-court press on prosecuting individuals for white collar crime in addition to corporate investigations: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Vicki Kennedy.

Vicki Kennedy, Sen. Ted Kennedy's Widow, Joins Greenberg Traurig

By Katelyn Polantz |

Victoria Reggie Kennedy, the widow of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy and a lawyer herself, will work for Greenberg Traurig in Boston and D.C., the firm announced Wednesday. Her title will be senior counsel, and she will focus on corporate legal issues, the firm said, rather than work in the government relations group.

William Moore.

Texas Businessman Settles Decades-Long Suit Against the Feds

By Zoe Tillman |

A Texas businessman who unsuccessfully pressed claims for more than two decades that he was the victim of malicious prosecution and retaliation by the federal government will pay $9,800 to bring the case to a close.

Richard Alexander.

Arnold & Porter's MP Named Next Firm Chairman

By Katelyn Polantz |

Arnold & Porter will have a new chairman on Jan. 1. Richard Alexander, the managing partner and a financial services lawyer in Washington, will take over for Thomas Milch, the firm announced Tuesday.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor (June 2015)

Morning Wrap: Sotomayor on Student Debt | Corporate Prosecution Deals Face Scrutiny

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Sonia Sotomayor dishes with students in Massachusetts. The D.C. Circuit this week will look at corporate prosecution deals. And the plaintiffs in the Texas same-sex marriage case want $740,000 in legal fees. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

J. Dennis Hastert.

Dennis Hastert's Son, a Lawyer, Replaced In Representing Father

By Katelyn Polantz |

Dennis Hastert's son Ethan Hastert will no longer represent his father in a civil case in Chicago, according to a motion filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Richard Roberts.

Feds' Fraud Case Over Bulletproof Vests Moves Closer to a Trial

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice's decade-old fraud case against a Japanese textile company that supplied material for bulletproof vests bought by law enforcement agencies is one step closer to a trial.

Georgetown University Law Center.

Former Washington Post President to Head Georgetown Law Business Program

By Katelyn Polantz |

Stephen Hills will become founding director of the law center's Business Skills program, the law school announced Tuesday.

U.S. Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C.

Former Acting Chief of DOJ Fraud Section Joins Willkie Farr & Gallagher

By Zoe Tillman |

William Stellmach, the former acting chief of the Fraud Section of the U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division, has joined Willkie Farr & Gallagher in Washington as a partner, the firm announced on Tuesday.

Former Hogan Lovells Clients Drop Lawsuit Over $36M Loss

By Zoe Tillman |

Former clients of Hogan Lovells legacy firm Hogan & Hartson have dismissed a lawsuit seeking to hold the firm liable for a $36 million loss in court.

Morning Wrap: Clerk's Texts Cause Trouble | Defense Rests in Dewey Trial

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Lawyers move to disqualify judge over clerk's texts and law firm ties, the latest on jailed Kentucky clerk and the defense rests in the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial.

Reggie Walton.

Clerk's Texts and Law Firm Ties Prompt Move to Disqualify Judge

By Zoe Tillman |

Lawyers for a woman who has accused professional baseball player Alfredo Simón Cabrera of rape have asked the judge in the case to step down, citing one of his clerk's ties to the law firm representing Cabrera. The disqualification effort was prompted by text messages the clerk sent to one of Cabrera's lawyers.

Hillary Clinton.

State Department Wants One Judge to Oversee Clinton Email Searches

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of State has asked the federal district court in Washington to assign a single judge to oversee issues related to the search of Hillary Clinton's emails and records provided by her former State Department aides.

U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Wrap: NSA in Court | DOJ Wants 'Coordinating Judge' in Clinton Email Litigation

By Mike Sacks |

A D.C. federal judge offers guidance on how to keep alive a suit challenging the NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records. The Justice Department wants a single judge to coordinate the FOIA lawsuits that involve Hillary Clinton's emails. And Akin Gump starts a Cuba practice. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Larry Klayman, left, and Richard Leon, right.

Judge Offers Guidance to Plaintiff Challenging NSA Phone Program

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon—who nearly two years ago ruled against the government's bulk collection of Americans' phone records—wants to proceed quickly now that a federal appeals court kept the case alive. He offered guidance to the lawyer who brought the challenge on what to do next.

An Update on the NLJ's Annual Influence 50 Survey

By Katelyn Polantz |

Later this month, The National Law Journal plans to publish a comprehensive look into public policy and lobbying practices across Washington. But first, we need your firm's help. We’re collecting data from law firms with public policy practices and government relations/strategy groups based in Washington, D.C.

Cozen Keeps Red Carpet, Plant Wall in Old Squire Sanders Space

By Katelyn Polantz |

The old-but-new Squire Sanders office space in Washington has a new occupant: Cozen O'Connor. Cozen, a Philadelphia-founded firm with a growing Washington office of litigators and public policy specialists, has subleased from Squire Patton Boggs, Squire's successor firm, until October 2026. The deal relieves a real estate burden for Squire Patton Boggs following a merger and quickly solves Cozen’s problem of needing more space in Washington.

Morning Wrap: The Uber Driver Class | Kentucky Defiance

By Mike Scarcella |

A California federal judge certifies a class of Uber drivers in employment litigation against the ride-share company. A Kentucky county clerk digs in, refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. And the D.C. Circuit says Wiley Rein isn't entitled to $2 million in fees for its work challenging the Voting Rights Act for Shelby County, Alabama. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Death Penalty Under Review | Petraeus Prosecutor Defends Hillary Clinton

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: The Ninth Circuit considers the death penalty, former Petraeus prosecutor argues Hillary Clinton committed no crime and a man with a drug history gets a second chance at law school.

Visitors outside the U.S. Supreme Court on August 29, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Justices Rule Against Ky. Clerk in Gay Marriage Case | D.C. Judge OKs Moral Challenge to ACA

By Mike Sacks |

The justices rule against the Kentucky county clerk who stopped issuing marriage licenses in response to the high court's same-sex marriage decision. A federal judge in Washington tees up a new challenge to the Affordable Care Act. And the Ninth Circuit takes a look at the constitutionality of California's death penalty. But will the panel even get to the merits? This is a daily news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Stephen Breyer.

Supreme Court Declines to Rehear Death Penalty Challenge

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday denied a request by three Oklahoma death row inmates for a rehearing of their case in order to re-examine the constitutionality of capital punishment. The high court's order denying the rehearing petition was issued without comment or dissent.

Jones Day

Morning Wrap: Video Sanction Voided | Feds Sued Over Fake News Article

By Mike Scarcella |

A federal appeals court has reversed an unprecedented sanction that required a Jones Day partner to make a training video. The Associated Press and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press on sue the FBI. And the Obama administration considers building a "Guantánamo North." This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Judge Rejects Claims in Suit Against McBee Strategic Over 'Soured' Deal

By Katelyn Polantz and Mike Scarcella |

A federal judge on Wednesday dismissed three claims against McBee Strategic Consulting from a former business partner who alleged he was duped into signing away his company and certain assets in a deal with the lobbying and consulting firm. "Without the assistance of hindsight, ill-fated corporate combinations, like bad marriages, may be as challenging to resist as they are unlikely to succeed. The coupling at the center of this case is no different," U.S. District Judge James Boasberg wrote.

Morning Wrap: Colorado Movie Theater Shooter Sentenced, Virginia TV News Shooter Case History Detailed

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Colorado movie theater shooter’s time in court comes to an end, and details emerge about the southern Virginia TV news shooter’s history of lawsuits: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Justice Anthony Kennedy in March on Capitol Hill.

Morning Wrap: What Justice Kennedy Said | Feds Ordered to Pay Fees in Forfeiture Case

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Anthony Kennedy’s words in the high court’s landmark gay-marriage ruling are being repeated at wedding ceremonies around the country. A federal district judge in Nevada says the U.S. government must pay nearly $147,000 in legal fees in a civil asset forfeiture case. And David Kendall, a lawyer for Hillary Clinton, responds—again—to Congress. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Sen. Robert Menendez, D-New Jersey

Morning Wrap: Menendez | Marriage | Market Meltdowns

By Mike Sacks |

Federal prosecutors file hundreds of pages of court records that challenge Sen. Robert Menendez's effort to stop the criminal case against him. The Sixth Circuit is poised to rule on whether clerks can, at least for now, stop issuing marriage licenses altogether. And Big Law, with its interest in China, closely eyes ongoing market volatility. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: The Lawyers Behind a Month of Big News

By Katelyn Polantz |

Twas the weekend to read meaty profiles of attorneys, from David Kendall of Williams & Connolly, to Tonja Carter of Alabama, to the corporate team at Cleary Gottlieb that works with Alphabet née Google: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Judge Amit Mehta in Washington quashed a subpoena issued by Amgen Inc. for journalist Paul Goldberg to testify at a deposition.

Pharmaceutical Company Can't Force Journalist to Testify, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Pharmaceutical company Amgen Inc. cannot force a journalist to testify about an article he wrote in 2007 that was cited in a shareholder lawsuit against the company, a federal district judge in Washington ruled on Friday.

Jamyra Gallmon, seen here in a hotel surveillance video the authorities provided to the media.

D.C. Lawyer's Killer Gets 24 Years in Prison

By Zoe Tillman |

The woman who fatally stabbed DLA Piper associate David Messerschmitt in a downtown Washington hotel room was sentenced Friday to 24 years in prison.

Thomas Boggs (2012)

Morning Wrap: The Tommy Boggs Estate Fight | Ted v. Larry in Calif. Court

By Mike Scarcella |

The estate of Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., the late super lawyer-lobbyist in Washington, is wrapped up in a fight over property. Ted Olson and Lawrence Lessig face off in a California court. And the Detroit couple in the Supreme Court's landmark gay marriage case will wed soon. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

David Messerschmitt.

Slain DLA Lawyer's Colleagues, Friends and Family Reflect on Loss

By Zoe Tillman |

In 82 pages of letters, colleagues, friends and family members of slain Washington lawyer David Messerschmitt shared their memories and grief with the judge who will sentence his killer on Friday. Many asked District of Columbia Superior Court Judge Michael Ryan to send the defendant, Jamyra Gallmon, to prison for 25 years—the highest sentence prosecutors agreed to seek in the plea deal.

Headquarters of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington D.C.

Morning Wrap: Lawyers May Be Getting Dumber, While Wachtell Makes a Clever Request

By Katelyn Polantz |

Wachtell Lipton ups the ante in its fight with activist investors by making an unusual request to the SEC. Plus, meet the female lawyers on the Dewey & LeBoeuf defense team, presidential candidate Lawrence Lessig, Gawker's general counsel and the law school grads who are failing the bar exam in this roundup of recent news stories.

David Messerschmitt.

Morning Wrap: Sentencing Set for DLA Lawyer's Killer | Feds Abandon Appeal Over Laptop Search

By Mike Scarcella |

Prosecutors in D.C. recommend a 25-year prison sentence for the woman who fatally stabbed DLA Piper associate David Messerschmitt. David Kendall, a lawyer for Hillary Clinton, responds to a congressional demand for information. A California judge is censured for helping out a friend. And the feds abandon their appeal, and criminal case, against a businessman who challenged the search of his laptop. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Amy Berman Jackson.

Laptop Evidence Suppressed, Feds Drop Criminal Case Against Businessman

By Zoe Tillman |

Federal prosecutors in Washington have dropped the criminal case against a Korean businessman charged with violating U.S. economic sanctions after a federal judge suppressed evidence seized from his laptop.

KBR Sues Defense Department for Records to Fight Tort Claims

By Mike Scarcella |

Defense contractor Kellogg Brown & Root Services alleges in a new lawsuit that the U.S. government is unfairly withholding contract records that the company says it needs to challenge tort allegations tied to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The company, represented by Covington & Burling, filed a public-records complaint Monday in Washington federal district court against the U.S. Department of Defense. "KBR's ability to defend itself adequately against litigation, in both pending suits and suits not yet filed, materially depends on obtaining records in possession of the DoD," the company's lawyers wrote.

Senator Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee (August 5, 2015)

Morning Wrap: Feds Defend Megaupload Forfeiture | Clinton Lawyer David Kendall Gets a Grassley Letter

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Justice Department defends the government's seizure of millions of dollars in assets tied to the defunct Megaupload file-sharing site. Sen. Chuck Grassley grills Hillary Clinton's lawyer, David Kendall, over email security. And the NCAA on Monday won its appeal before the National Labor Relations Board over Northwestern University football players' attempt to unionize. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Viet Dinh.

Bancroft Moves to New Office Near Georgetown Law

By Tony Mauro |

The Bancroft law firm, which launched from its founder's home 12 years ago and then relocated to downtown Washington, has moved into bigger digs near Georgetown University Law Center. "We wanted more space, more light and more food trucks," firm founder Viet Dinh said Monday. The new office at 500 New Jersey Ave., N.W., is also convenient because Dinh and former solicitor general Paul Clement, a partner at the firm, teach at Georgetown Law.

Morning Wrap: Julian Bond, Remembered | Former SCOTUS Clerks on the Hill | Jury Exclusions

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Civil rights leader Julian Bond dies, plaintiffs lawyers take on police brutality cases and renewed scrutiny of prosecutors who strike black jurors from the pool.

Alan Gura.

D.C. to Pay $75K in Legal Fees After Losing Challenge to Ban on Carrying Firearms

By Zoe Tillman |

The District of Columbia government has agreed to pay $75,000 in legal fees to Alan Gura, the lawyer who successfully challenged the city’s prohibition on carrying firearms in public.

Joe Arpaio.

D.C. Circuit Rejects Arizona Sheriff's Challenge to Obama Immigration Policies

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal appeals court in Washington on Friday rejected a constitutional challenge to President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration, finding that Maricopa County Sheriff Joseph Arpaio lacks standing to bring the case.

Morning Wrap: Death Penalty Ruling | Pirate Sentencing

By Happy Carlock |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: The Connecticut Supreme Court strikes down the death penalty, a Colorado court says a baker could not cite religious beliefs in refusing to make wedding cakes for same-sex couples and a patent lawyer who escaped punishment by the U.S. Supreme Court in March joins a new firm.

Old Post Office in Washington, D.C., future home of Donald Trump's new hotel.

Meet the D.C. Lawyers Representing Celebrity Chefs Sued by Trump

By Happy Carlock |

Defending lawsuits filed by one of the most outspoken 2016 presidential candidates against a pair of celebrity chefs, Washington lawyers Paul Kiernan and Deborah Baum look like they can take the heat.

Bert Brandenburg.

DC Court Reformer Moving to New Job

By Katelyn Polantz |

This month Justice at Stake, one of the most visible groups opposing the politicization of judicial seats, will lose its executive director.

Morning Wrap: An FTC Announcement, Plus Tom Brady and Rose’s Luxury

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Federal Trade Commission has changed the way it handles antitrust cases. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Morning Wrap: KBR Granted Privilege | ACLU Victory

By Happy Carlock |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Defense contractor Kellogg Brown & Root Inc.'s docs are protected by attorney-client privilege, Ohio’s Board of Professional Conduct says Ohio judges can't refuse to marry same-sex couples and a federal appeals court orders jail officials to deliver ACLU letters sent to inmates.