Blog of Legal Times

Morning Wrap: Two Bar Associations Oppose 'Slants' Trademark | Threats Case Over Abortion Clinic Revived

By Happy Carlock |

Two Asian American Bar Associations are siding against an Asian-American rock band that wants to register its name as "The Slants." A federal appeals court revives a civil threats case against a woman who sent a threatening letter to a doctor who planned to open an abortion clinic in Kansas. A mom throws her toddler a personal injury lawyer-themed birthday. And an appeals court upholds one of the Obama administration’s major environmental regulations. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Charles Grassley.

Grassley Compares Supreme Court to a 'River Flooding Its Banks'

By Mike Sacks |

The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday railed against significant U.S. Supreme Court decisions from the past term, saying the unified votes of left-leaning justices "give rise to an appearance that their loyalties are to each other and to their preferred principles and policies, rather than to the Constitution."

Boies, Schiller & Flexner is planning to move to a renovated space on the 10th and 11th floors at 1401 New York Ave. in Washington.

Boies Schiller to Abandon Suburbs for Downtown D.C.

By Katelyn Polantz |

One of the few Am Law 100 law firms in Washington located far from the central business district is moving. Boies, Schiller & Flexner, whose D.C. lawyers work in a building near the Maryland border, plans to move to New York Avenue and 14th Street downtown in the late summer or fall next year.

D.C. Superior Court Judge Judith Bartnoff listens to a student during a mock trial held at Mayer Brown’s D.C. office on July 24, 2015.

At Mock Trial, These D.C. Students Make Their Case

By Happy Carlock |

Middle school students in Washington act out plaintiff, defense and witness roles as part of the fifth annual career day and mock trial for Higher Achievement scholars, hosted at Mayer Brown's D.C. office. D.C. Superior Court judges Judith Bartnoff and Neal Kravitz presided over the mock trial.

Justice Stephen Breyer on Capitol Hill in March.

Morning Wrap: Sentencing Reform's Moment | Is 'Happy Birthday' Not Copyrighted After All?

By Mike Sacks |

Lawyers for three of the Oklahoma death row inmates who lost at the Supreme Court in June are asking the justices to rehear the case. The Boy Scouts of America on Monday officially ended its ban on gay troop leaders. And sentencing reform is having a moment on Capitol Hill. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Anti-death penalty activists hold a four day liquid-only fast and vigil to mark the anniversaries of the 1972 Furman and 1976 Gregg Supreme Court decisions involving the death penalty. The vigil, organized by the Abolitionist Action Committee, coincided with court's last public session of the current term when the opinion in Glossip v. Gross was expected to be announced. June 29, 2015.

Citing Breyer's Dissent, Okla. Inmates Want Death Case Reheard

By Tony Mauro |

After absorbing defeat in the U.S. Supreme Court lethal-injection case Glossip v. Gross in June, lawyers for three Oklahoma death row inmates decided to take advantage of what they saw as the decision’s silver lining. That bright spot was Justice Stephen Breyer’s unusual dissent that declared the time had come for the court to take a full re-examination of capital punishment, rather than a piecemeal approach.

Morning Wrap: Atticus Finch's Teachable Moment | Feds Urge Life for Peanut Exec

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Law profs react to "Go Set a Watchman," life in prison recommended for peanut executive linked to salmonella outbreak and lawyers advise clients on what the Iran deal could mean for business.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (September 2014)

Morning Wrap: Clinton's Email Mess | Contraception Conflict | Hard Times for Hastert

By Mike Sacks |

Two inspectors general want the Justice Department to look into whether Hillary Clinton mishandled sensitive government information through her use of private email. Washington state can force pharmacies to dispense contraceptives, a federal appeals court ruled. And a civil suit against former House speaker Dennis Hastert was reinstated. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Ted Olson, of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, right, and David Boies, of Boies, Schiller and Flexner, left.

Sweeping Protections Proposed Against Anti-LGBT Bias

By Mike Sacks |

Congressional Democrats on Thursday introduced a bill that would extend federal civil rights protection against sexual-orientation and gender-identity discrimination in employment, education, housing, public accommodations and other important areas of American life.

Online Travel Companies Must Pay Sales Tax, D.C. Appeals Court Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Online travel companies such as Expedia and Travelocity are on the hook for more than $60 million in back sales taxes after a Washington appeals court ruled Thursday that the companies are liable for sales tax on hotel rooms they sell through their websites.

Former Alaska senator Ted Stevens exits the Federal Courthouse with family and friends after a federal district judge in D.C. dismissed the case against him and initiated criminal contempt proceedings against the trial prosecutors..  April 7, 2009.

Secrecy of Feds' Prosecution Playbook Challenged in D.C. Circuit

By Zoe Tillman and Mike Scarcella |

Law professors, the American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups this week urged a federal appeals court in Washington to force the U.S. Department of Justice to publicly disclose a manual created for prosecutors amid fallout from the botched case against the late Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens.

Sidley Austin's Carter Phillips

Morning Wrap: Jed Rakoff on the 'Highly Reputed' Carter Phillips | Cruz v. SCOTUS

By Mike Scarcella |

New York judge: The "chutzpah" of arguing that Sidley Austin's Carter Phillips failed to provide effective counsel! The bold, end-of-days declarations of Justice Antonin Scalia. Is he crying wolf? And Sen. Ted Cruz offers some solutions about what he sees as the "lawlessness" of the Supreme Court. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Christopher

D.C. Judge Allows Some Forfeiture Claims to Proceed

By Happy Carlock |

A federal judge will allow a challenge to Washington's seizure and forfeiture law to move forward as lawsuits mount across the country over the constitutionality of the taking of property without criminal charges. "Civil asset forfeiture laws—which enable law enforcement agencies to seize property they believe has been involved in criminal activity—have generated considerable controversy in recent years," U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper in Washington said.

(l-r) Patricia Millett, Robert Wilkins, and Judith Rogers.

D.C. Circuit Issues Rare Public Reprimand of Lawyer

By Zoe Tillman |

A lawyer in Washington who showed "a palpable lack of respect for both this court and the disciplinary process" received a rare public reprimand Tuesday by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Plaintiff Jim Obergefell holds a photo of his late husband John Arthur, who died of ALS in 2013, outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments after the court announced its opinion in the same-sex marriage case Obergefell v Hodges.  June 26, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Pocket-Dials and Privacy | Jim Obergefell's Book Deal | Game Over for Barry Bonds Case

By Happy Carlock |

Jim Obergefell, the plaintiff in the Supreme Court's landmark gay-marriage case, has a book deal. A federal appeals court says you have no privacy expectation if someone overhears your pocket-dialed call (but the person you're speaking with might). And the feds walk away from the Barry Bonds obstruction case. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Television cameras outside the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. March 4, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Poll Finds Support for Supreme Court Term Limits, Camera Access

By Tony Mauro |

Public support for life tenure for Supreme Court justices is decreasing, while the idea of allowing cameras in the court is more popular than ever, according to a new poll sponsored by C-SPAN and released Tuesday.

Senator Robert Menendez, right, with his lawyer Abbe Lowell, outside the federal courthouse in Newark, New Jersey.

Morning Wrap: Law Prof's Killing Remains Unsolved | Menendez Moves to Dismiss Charges

By Happy Carlock |

The killing of Florida State law professor Dan Markel remains unsolved a year later. Lawyers for New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez accuse the government of improperly using protected information in the corruption case against him. And the Eighth Circuit revives a Missouri lawmaker's challenge against the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Samuel Alito.

Alito Critiques Gay-Marriage Ruling, Defends Citizens United

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Jr., in an interview with Bill Kristol posted Sunday night, criticized the high court's June 26 ruling declaring a right to same-sex marriage. The justice warned "we are at sea" in defining the limits of constitutional protections of liberty.

Mary Bonauto autographs printed opinions outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs in Obergefell v Hodges.  June 26, 2015.

Morning Wrap: Reflections On the Term | Law Firms Cut Bank Debt

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Mary Bonauto's advice for lawyers going before the Supreme Court, law firms scale back reliance on bank loans and a profile of a FOIA wizard.

Dickstein Shapiro's Washington, D.C. offices at 1825 I Street, NW.

Dickstein Shapiro's Top Insurance Lawyer, 9 Others in LA to Leave Firm

By Katelyn Polantz |

Kirk Pasich, one of few rainmakers left at Dickstein Shapiro and a nationally known insurance litigator, will pull his practice group from the D.C.-based law firm, according to five people familiar with his plans. Pasich and nine other Dickstein lawyers will join Liner LLP, two of the people said.

D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh (middle) and Eleventh Circuit Judge William Pryor Jr. (right) discuss the U.S. Supreme Court, their paths to the bench and other topics at a Federalist Society DC Young Lawyers Chapter event on July 16. CBS News correspondent Jan Crawford (left) moderated.

D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh, a Former Kennedy Clerk, Reflects on Term

By Zoe Tillman |

D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Eleventh Circuit Judge William Pryor Jr. spoke Thursday about the latest U.S. Supreme Court term and their own career paths to the bench.

(l-r) Jeremy Zucker (as Rico Bublé), Ed Spitzberg (as Eddie Lounge), Melissa Romain (as Gina Tonic), and Alex Romain (as Mo Heeto) in “The Eddie Lounge Reunion Tour

Law Partners Become Performers at Capital Fringe Festival

By Happy Carlock |

When they're not singing and swiveling their hips to funk and soul favorites from Barry White and Marvin Gaye, these three Washington lawyers are litigation and regulatory partners at firms here. Jeremy Zucker, of Dechert; Alex Romain of Williams & Connolly; and Michael Nilsson of Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis will trade their suits for tuxedos and sequins this week for their performance in the 10th annual Capital Fringe Festival in Washington.

Ted Cruz.

Ted Cruz Sets Hearing on 'Supreme Court Activism'

By Mike Sacks |

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, will preside over a hearing next week to address what he has called the "judicial activism, plain and simple," of the U.S. Supreme Court after its decisions in favor of the Affordable Care Act and same-sex marriage. Cruz started the conversation late last month when he proposed a constitutional amendment to force retention elections for Supreme Court justices.

Justice Anthony Kennedy in March on Capitol Hill.

Morning Wrap: Justice Kennedy Reflects | Apple Employee Class Certified

By Happy Carlock |

Justice Anthony Kennedy reflects on writing the court's gay-marriage ruling. A California judge certifies a class of Apple employees in a suit over the company's bag-search policy. Defense lawyers take on a key prosecution witness at the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Jeh Johnson.

Judge Won't Force Homeland Security Chief to Testify in Privacy Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson will not have to testify in a civil lawsuit rooted in the David Petraeus sex scandal, a federal judge in Washington ruled on Thursday.

Covington Sues CFPB Over 'Consumer Voices' Report

By Mike Scarcella |

Covington & Burling is suing a federal agency over a February 2015 report that addressed consumers' concerns about credit reports and scores. The law firm, pursuing the records at the request of an unidentified client, wants information about the selection of the focus groups that formed the substance of the CFPB report; the participants' responses; and demographic data about the participants.

Douglas Hughes, right, the gyrocopter pilot who landed on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol, talks with members of the media outside of Federal Court after a status hearing Monday June 22, 2015, in Washington.

Gyrocopter Pilot Wants to Hire First Amendment Lawyer

By Zoe Tillman |

Douglas Hughes, the gyrocopter pilot who landed his aircraft on the U.S. Capitol lawn in April to advocate for campaign finance reform, wants to add veteran First Amendment lawyer Mark Goldstone to his criminal defense team, according to court papers filed on Thursday.

Morning Wrap: Shuster, Schock Legal Bills Revealed | Gay Rights Group Goes Out of Business

By Katelyn Polantz |

What members of Congress have spent on legal bills, plus looks into summer associate classes, Vermont courts and a long-time DOJ attorney. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

U.S. Marine Cpl. Armondo Cortez (Left), a data network specialist, and Cpl. Estevan D. Hernandez (Right), a telephone switchboard and personal computer intermediate repairer, with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, discuss their plan for the deconstruction of the command operation center during the retrograde of Patrol Base Boldak in Helmand Province, Afghanistan on Aug. 14, 2014.

A Judge Ponders: Is The Afghanistan War Really Over?

By Zoe Tillman |

President Barack Obama last year announced the end of U.S. combat in Afghanistan. A federal judge in Washington will decide if the war is actually over or if, as the government argues, there are "active hostilities" that justify the continued detention of a prisoner at the U.S. military base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

J. Dennis Hastert during a Congressional hearing on  March 14, 2007.

Morning Wrap: The Atticus Finch Files | ACA Challenge Fails | Hastert's Gripes

By Happy Carlock |

A 1992 column in Legal Times about Atticus Finch is seen in new light. A federal appeals court rejects a challenge to provisions of the ACA's contraceptive mandate. A lawyer for Dennis Hastert, the former House speaker, has a few words to say about media leaks. And the Justice Department argues against the disclosure of evidence in the ethics case against Montana federal district judge Richard Cebull, who amid controversy about his racist emails. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Legal Times, February 24, 1992

23 Years Later, Law Prof's Dim View of Atticus Finch Vindicated

By Katelyn Polantz |

Monroe Freedman wrote an article in our very own Legal Times more than 20 years ago that was attacked when published because of his appraisal of Atticus Finch, the fictional lawyer and protagonist of "To Kill a Mockingbird." A role model for lawyers? Freedman thought not. This week, with the publication of "Go Set a Watchman," Freedman is the rare prophetic voice among the literary world's exclamations of shock.

Elijah Cummings.

House Hearing Highlights Bipartisan Push for Criminal Justice Reform

By Mike Sacks |

A House Oversight Committee hearing Tuesday on criminal justice reform added to the bipartisan push for federal legislation, rooted in state successes and touted by both chambers of Congress, the White House and interest groups across the ideological spectrum.

Williams & Connolly.

Williams & Connolly's Lance Armstrong Files Shielded in Fraud Suit

By Mike Scarcella |

Floyd Landis, the one-time teammate of Lance Armstrong who is suing the cyclist for fraud, lost his bid late Monday to force the law firm Williams & Connolly to turn over documents that Landis hoped would bolster his case. A Washington federal trial judge said the attorney-client privilege protects the information.

Morning Wrap: 'Our Selma' | Harvard Law, Now Homeless

By Mike Sacks |

The trial over North Carolina's 2013 election law overhaul began Monday. President Obama commutes the sentences of 46 nonviolent drug offenders. On the Hill: Will criminal justice reform succeed? And the star witness testifies at the Dewey & LeBoeuf trial in New York. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Morning Wrap: Bragging Rights for Wilmer | Atticus Finch, Revisited | Scalia/Ginsburg On Stage

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: which firms argued the most Supreme Court cases last term, one of literature's most famous lawyers has a new legacy and a Mexican drug lord escapes prison.

Robert McDonnell. July 9, 2013.

Former Virginia Governor's Public Corruption Conviction Upheld

By Zoe Tillman |

Robert McDonnell, the former Virginia governor, "received a fair trial and was duly convicted by a jury of his fellow Virginians," a Fourth Circuit panel said on Friday. "We have no cause to undo what has been done."

Gladys Kessler.

Morning Wrap: Takata Rejects Victim Fund | Judge Assails Feds Over Gitmo Videos | Uber's Lawyers Push Back

By Happy Carlock |

U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler slams the Justice Department over delay in releasing redacted Guantanamo videos. Takata spurns a U.S. senator's push for a victim compensation fund. Federal marriage benefits are extended to same-sex partners nationwide. And Uber's lawyers push back against a class action over drivers' employment status. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Moultrie Courthouse.

Federal Prosecutor Nominated to D.C. Superior Court

By Zoe Tillman |

Darlene Soltys, an assistant U.S. attorney in Washington, was nominated on Thursday to the District of Columbia Superior Court, the White House announced.

Judge Patricia Millett, pictured, and Judge Michael Small, both formerly lawyers at Akin Gump, were named to the firm's pro bono hall of fame this week.  July 9, 2015.

Judges Reflect on Their Former Firm's Pro Bono Work

By Katelyn Polantz |

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld took the opportunity at its annual pro bono awards ceremony to shine the spotlight on two former members who left the firm for public service. Judge Patricia Millett, now serving on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and Judge Michael Small of Los Angeles County Superior Court were named to the firm's pro bono hall of fame Wednesday night.

Library Visit Spurs a Yearslong Fight for FBI Records

By Happy Carlock |

Twenty years after the Unabomber's manifesto was first published in The Washington Post, a man who was briefly questioned then as a potential suspect in the domestic terrorism investigation is still fighting the U.S. Department of Justice for access to documents—about himself.

Morning Wrap: Partner v. Partner Suits Progress at Three Firms

By Katelyn Polantz |

Tension at small law firms in New York, Florida and at Dickstein Shapiro spills over into lawsuits: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Crowell & Moring offices in Washington, D.C.

Office Cleaner for Crowell & Moring Names Firm As Defendant in $5M Suit

By Katelyn Polantz |

A woman who cleaned Crowell & Moring's Pennsylvania Avenue offices has named the law firm as a defendant in a $5 million negligence suit after she fell and broke her arm on the job. The fall and subsequent surgeries on Maria Lopez's elbow were so debilitating she can no longer work, according to her complaint. The firm declined to comment, citing the pending case.

Crowell & Moring Drops $970K Attorney-Fee Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

Crowell & Moring has dropped a suit accusing a former client of failing to pay more than $970,000 in legal fees.

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh C. Johnson

Morning Wrap: Texas Judge Tells Jeh Johnson See You in Court | D.C. Circuit Upholds Contributions Ban

By Happy Carlock |

President Obama's hope to nominate a Covington & Burling partner to the SEC is on hold amid pressure from activists and Senate Democrats. Harvard and UNC want admissions suits on hold pending SCOTUS resolution of Fisher v. University of Texas. DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson has been ordered to show up in a Texas courtroom. And a Louisiana prosecutor has become the country's most blunt defender of the death penalty. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Merrick Garland.

Federal Contractors Lose Challenge to Campaign Contribution Ban

By Zoe Tillman |

A ban on federal campaign contributions by individuals who contract with the U.S. government is constitutional, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit held on Tuesday in an 11-0 decision.

Judge Jed Rakoff of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Morning Wrap: Eric Holder's Time-Out | Judge Rakoff's Skepticism

By Mike Sacks |

Eric Holder's next challenge: navigating ethics rules and building a practice. Judge Jed Rakoff, sitting on the Ninth Circuit, ices a major Second Circuit ruling on insider-trading. And the U.S. Senate is expected soon to confirm two circuit nominations. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Supreme Court reporters spoke last week at Arnold & Porter in a discussion hosted by the D.C. Bar Section on Courts, Lawyers and the Administration of Justice.

Reflections and Predictions From Five Supreme Court Reporters

Five reporters who cover the U.S. Supreme Court, including the NLJ's Tony Mauro, spoke last week at Arnold & Porter for a discussion hosted by the D.C. Bar Section on Courts, Lawyers and the Administration of Justice. Arthur Spitzer, legal director of the ACLU National Capital Area, moderated the talk.

Stan Brand.

Veteran Washington Lawyer Stan Brand Joins Akin Gump

By Mike Sacks |

After more than three decades running a firm that bears his name, Stan Brand, a veteran of Washington political law and congressional ethics, has moved his practice to Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld.

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr., now back at his former firm Covington & Burling, left, and Timothy Hester, chair of the firm’s Management and Executive Committees, right.

Morning Wrap: Eric Holder Returns to Covington | Loretta Lynch and the World Cup

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A Q&A with Eric Holder on his return to Covington & Burling, the Ninth Circuit shakes off renegade reputation and the federal judiciary wants Congress to back off.

Justice Samuel Alito at the Shakespeare Theatre Company's Mock Trial 2012.

Justices' Financial Reports Shed Light on Alito 'Unrecusal'

By Zoe Tillman |

The federal judiciary on Thursday released the U.S. Supreme Court justices' financial disclosure reports for 2014, shedding light on Justice Samuel Alito Jr.'s 'unrecusal' from a case that involved The Coca-Cola Co.

Morning Wrap: The Lawyering Up Edition

By Katelyn Polantz |

An interview with Dentons’ leaders about its growth to the world's largest firm, while cyclists and the Texas attorney general get their own lawyers. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

The press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 29, the last opinion announcement session of the 2014-2015 term.

Looking Back at the Tenth Year of the Roberts Court

By Mike Scarcella |

The NLJ's Marcia Coyle looks back at the tenth year of the Roberts Court in a discussion Wednesday evening on PBS NewsHour with Joan Biskupic, legal affairs editor for Reuters, and SCOTUSblog editor Amy Howe. The big rulings. The alliances. And what's coming next.

J. Michael Farren after his arrest in 2010.

Former White House Lawyer Disbarred in D.C.

By Zoe Tillman |

Former White House lawyer J. Michael Farren, who was found guilty last year of attempted murder for assaulting his former wife, has been disbarred in the District of Columbia.

U.S. Supreme Court.  June 29, 2015.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS by the Numbers | Union Fees Challenged

By Happy Carlock |

The U.S. Supreme Court agrees to take up a challenge to union fees in California. The NSA's bulk collection of Americans' phone records is set to continue, if temporarily. And by-the-numbers looks at the just-ended high-court term. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Jonathan Turley on Capitol Hill in 2010.

House Enlists Liberal Justices in Case Against Affordable Care Act

By Mike Sacks |

Lawyers for the House of Representatives are claiming the U.S. Supreme Court's liberals as new allies in a lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act that's pending in Washington federal district court. The House's lawyers said Monday's Supreme Court decision upholding Arizona's independent redistricting commission supports the House argument that it has standing to sue the Obama administration.

Merrick Garland.

D.C. Circuit Caseload Rises From Spike in Agency Challenges

By Zoe Tillman |

The caseload of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit rose sharply over the past year from new administrative challenges to environmental regulations and labor rulings, Chief Judge Merrick Garland said at the circuit's judicial conference last week.

People enter the U.S. Supreme Court on the court's last public session of the current term when the opinion in Glossip v. Gross was expected to be announced.  June 29, 2015.

Marcia Coyle on PBS NewsHour: The End-of-Term Rulings

By Mike Scarcella |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's chief Washington correspondent, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff on Monday evening about the Supreme Court's end-of-term rulings, including a decision on EPA regulations and the constitutionality of a lethal injection drug.

Runners with printed opinions race to media crews outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the court's last public session of the term.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS Out | Ted Cruz the Rehnquist Clerk

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Supreme Court ended its blockbuster term on Monday with three 5-4 decisions and three high-profile orders that point to another big term on the horizon. A federal employee labor union is suing OPM over a data breach. And Ted Cruz recounts his year as a Supreme Court clerk for Chief Justice William Rehnquist. This is a roundup from ALM and other publications.

Anti-death penalty activists hold a four day liquid-only fast and vigil to mark the anniversaries of the 1972 Furman and 1976 Gregg Supreme Court decisions involving the death penalty.  The vigil, organized by the Abolitionist Action Committee, coincided with court's last public session of the current term when the opinion in Glossip v. Gross was expected to be announced.  June 29, 2015.

A Solemn Protest as High Court Rules for Death Penalty Drug

By Happy Carlock |

Twenty death penalty opponents were on the U.S. Supreme Court plaza Monday awaiting the justices' ruling on the lawfulness of Oklahoma's lethal injection procedure. The demonstrators sat silently in chairs, holding banners that said "Stop State Killing" and "End executions now!"

Ted Olson leaves the U.S. Supreme Court after arguments in the same-sex marriage cases in April.

Morning Wrap: Future of Gay Rights | Ted Olson Says Scalia's 'Wrong' | The Justice Gap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: More reactions to Friday's same-sex marriage ruling, how Big Law is failing legal aid and the story of a drug-addicted narcotics cop.

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments before the court announced its opinion in the same-sex marriage case Obergefell v Hodges.  June 26, 2015.

Marcia Coyle on PBS NewsHour: Kennedy on the Dignity of Marriage

By Mike Scarcella |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's chief Washington correspondent, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Hari Sreenivasan on Friday evening about the Supreme Court's historic ruling that declared same-sex marriages constitutional.

Runners rush to media outlets waiting outside the U.S. Supreme Court holding copies of opinions in the case Obergefell v Hodges.  The court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs, making same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states.  June 26, 2015.

Slideshow: Anticipation, then Jubilation, at High Court

There was jubilation outside the Supreme Court on Friday as the justices ruled for same-sex marriage. NLJ photographer Diego Radzinschi and reporter Happy Carlock capture the scene in this slideshow.

Plaintiff Jim Obergefell holds a photo of his late husband John Arthur, who died of ALS in 2013, outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments after the court announced its opinion in the same-sex marriage case Obergefell v Hodges.  June 26, 2015.

On the Supreme Court Plaza, a Celebration of Marriage Rights

By Happy Carlock |

Same-sex marriage proponents waving blue and yellow flags and wearing rainbow facepaint erupted into chants of "U-S-A! U-S-A!" moments after the U.S. Supreme Court announced its landmark decision legalizing gay unions.

Roberta Kaplan, partner at Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison, addressing the media outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the second day of arguments in cases relating to same-sex marriage.  Today the challenge was to the Defense of Marriage Act, a federal law.  March 27, 2013.

There's 'Joy' in Big Law After Marriage Ruling

By Katelyn Polantz |

"Exaltation, crying, absolute unmitigated joy," Roberta Kaplan said Friday after the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage ruling. "I don't think anyone was that surprised, but we all had in the back of our hearts this lingering fear that it would not be what we hoped."

Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments before the court announced its opinion in the same-sex marriage case Obergefell v Hodges.  June 26, 2015.

Highlights from the Supreme Court's Gay Marriage Decision

By Mike Sacks |

The U.S. Supreme Court's historic decision on Friday legalizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states is loaded with lofty language characteristic of its lead author, Justice Anthony Kennedy. The decision found Chief Justice John Roberts back among the court's conservatives. What follows are highlights from the decision.

Georgetown Law Center Professor Irv Gornstein summarizing the U.S. Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision at the Judicial Conference of the D.C. Circuit.  June 26, 2015.

How D.C. Judges Learned About the Same-Sex Marriage Opinion

By Zoe Tillman |

As news broke online about the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision on Friday, quiet gasps and a single clap were heard at a gathering of Washington judges and lawyers. The high court's decision to schedule an extra day of decision announcements on Friday had one direct consequence for the D.C. Circuit conference: Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., who has attended in the past, was not there to deliver remarks about the state of the federal judiciary.

Arsenal v Chelsea.  April 2012.

D.C. Federal Judge on Soccer Fandom and Footnotes

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge John Bates made headlines earlier this week when he handed for-profit colleges a loss in their fight against federal regulations. His opinion stood out for another reason: a soccer-themed footnote. Bates compared the U.S. Department of Education's efforts to measure the success of preparing students for "gainful employment" to fans who assess the performance of Arsenal, a soccer team in the English Premier League.

Supreme Court building photo illustration.

Morning Wrap: 'Bahia Emerald' Blocked | 'SCOTUScare' at 1 First Street NE

By Happy Carlock |

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. and Justice Antonin Scalia spar over the Affordable Care Act. A Washington federal district judge weighs in on the "Bahia Emerald." This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Demonstrators in favor of the Obama Administration's Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court moments before the court announced its opinion in the subsidies case King v. Burwell, ruling in favor of the government.  June 25, 2015.

Supreme Court Health Care Ruling Hardly Disrupts Big Law

By Katelyn Polantz |

A business-as-usual vibe extended to litigators and professional groups despite political jeers and celebrations Thursday after the Supreme Court validated the Affordable Care Act's subsidies. Still, many Big Law attorneys will find new opportunities to work with clients in relation to the law.

U.S. Supreme Court.  June 25, 2015.

Dems Celebrate High-Court Ruling, Cruz Assails 'Robed Houdinis'

By Mike Sacks |

Democrats celebrated the Supreme Court win for the Obama administration's health care subsidies and called for an end to attempts to repeal the law. Republican leadership on Capitol Hill largely refrained from stridently criticizing the Supreme Court's health care ruling Thursday as some in the party made more aggressive statements denouncing the decision.

Runners rush to media outlets waiting outside the U.S. Supreme Court holding copies of opinions in the case King v. Burwell.  Today the court ruled in favor of the government in the case involving the Affordable Care Act subsidies.  June 25, 2015.

'SCOTUScare' and 'Inartful Drafting': Quotes from King v. Burwell

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday again spared the Obama administration a defeat on its signature health care law. Here are 10 key quotes from the majority and dissenting opinions, which reflected the tense political conversation that has long surrounded the Affordable Care Act.

Morning Wrap: New Jersey Firm to Close | Attorneys Prep for This Morning’s SCOTUS Rulings

By Katelyn Polantz |

Supreme Court decisions are coming this morning, while movie theater shooter James Holmes’ defense argues in Colorado, and a law firm shutters in New Jersey. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

John Breaux, left, and Trent Lott, right.

Breaux, Lott to Stay at Squire Patton for Another Year

By Katelyn Polantz |

Washington's two most eligible lobbyists are off the market for another year. Former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and former Senator John Breaux, who co-chair the public policy practice at Squire Patton Boggs, have signed a one-year extension with the firm. Their contract was set to expire this month.

Media wait outside the U.S. Supreme Court.  June 22, 2015.

Supreme Court Urged to Allow Broadcast of Historic Opinion Announcements

By Tony Mauro |

Sixteen members of Congress, including Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to allow live broadcast of the historic opinion announcements expected in coming days.

A Sysco delivery truck on Connecticut Ave. NW in Washington, D.C.

Morning Wrap: Sysco-US Foods Merger Blocked | SCOTUS Predictions

By Happy Carlock |

A Washington federal judge has temporarily blocked the Sysco-US Foods proposed merger. State governors call for the removal of the Confederate flag. And law professors offer predictions on how the Supreme Court will resolve same-sex marriage. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

For-Profit Colleges Lose Challenge to Financial Aid Criteria

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Education can determine if students attending for-profit colleges are eligible for financial aid based on graduates' ability to pay off their school debt, U.S. District Judge John Bates in Washington ruled on Tuesday.

U.S. Capitol.

Announcing the Annual LT 150 Survey

By Katelyn Polantz |

We’re hard at work on the LT 150, our annual survey of the largest law offices in the D.C. metro area. This market has several well-known national and international firms leading the pack, yet we realize there are many smaller regional outlets that have concentrated efforts here, too. If your firm is around 30 lawyers, we may need data from you. Our full report on the legal industry in and around Washington, D.C., will publish in the National Law Journal on Aug. 3.

D.C. to Allow Laptops for Bar Exam Essay

By Zoe Tillman |

Aspiring lawyers taking the bar exam in July in D.C. will be allowed to use their laptops for the essay portion, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals announced Monday.

Media waiting outside the U.S. Supreme Court.  June 22, 2015.

Marcia Coyle on PBS NewsHour: The High-Court Grapevine Edition

By Mike Scarcella |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's chief Washington correspondent, speaks with PBS NewsHour host Gwen Ifill about the Supreme Court's rulings on hotel registries and grapes.

Justice Elena Kagan

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS & Spider-Man | Challenge to ACA Fails in Fifth Circuit

By Mike Sacks |

Justice Elena Kagan injects comic book maxims in her ruling on a Spider-Man toy and royalties. The Fifth Circuit rejects religious organizations' challenge to accommodations for the ACA's contraception mandate. The first Asian-Pacific judge takes his oath on the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta receives the oath of office from Judge Sri Srinivasan of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on June 19, 2015.

First Asian-American Judge Sworn in to D.C. Federal District Court

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta, who was born in India and arrived in the United States as a young child, was formally sworn in Friday as the first Asian Pacific American on the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Morning Wrap: Health Insurers Brace for Ruling | Female Deans on the Rise

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: How Justice Anthony Kennedy became a gay rights icon, the end of the corner office for Nixon Peabody and a real estate spat involving Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

S. Martin Teel Jr.

Federal Bankruptcy Judge in D.C. Seeking Third Term

By Zoe Tillman |

Judge S. Martin Teel Jr., the federal bankruptcy judge for the District of Columbia, is seeking a third, 14-year term.

Jeh Johnson.

Jeh Johnson Fights Demand for Testimony in Privacy Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson is fighting a subpoena for his testimony in a lawsuit rooted in the 2012 sex scandal that forced former CIA director David Petraeus to resign.

DC Bar Foundation Awards $615K in Grants to Civil Legal Services Providers

By Happy Carlock |

The D.C. Prisoners’ Project is one of 22 recipients of a D.C. Bar Foundation Legal Services Grant this year. The foundation awarded $615,000 in private grants to organizations that provide civil legal services to underserved and low-income residents of the Washington metropolitan area.

Marcia Coyle on PBS NewsHour: Analyzing the Court's First Amendment Opinions

By Mike Scarcella |

Marcia Coyle, the NLJ's chief Washington correspondent, spoke with PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff on Thursday evening about the Supreme Court's two First Amendment rulings: the Texas license plates case Walker v. Sons of Confederate Veterans, and Reed v. Town of Gilbert, a dispute over a church's roadside signs.

Jeh Johnson

Morning Wrap: Jeh Johnson Fights Depo | Google Evidence

By Mike Scarcella |

Jeh Johnson, the Homeland Security Department secretary, is fighting a deposition demand in a privacy suit. The Ninth Circuit looks at the admissibility of machine-made evidence. Head count at Paul Weiss swells. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

Akin Gump’s D.C. office with some of the food that was donated to the Capital Area Food Bank. (L to R Laura Dunning (legal secretary), Tony Pierce (D.C. office partner in charge), Martie Kendrick (partner), Scott Johnson (associate) and Maggie Sinnott (special assistant to the firm chairperson), and all of whom helped coordinate the firm’s participation in the Food From the Bar campaign. June 3, 2015.

Food Drive Gathers $260K, Towers of Vienna Sausages from D.C. Law Firms

By Katelyn Polantz |

Even in a charity food drive, lawyers want to win. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld's D.C. office capitalized on the instinct and collected nearly 4,000 pounds of food for an annual legal industry drive for the Capital Area Food Bank, called Food from the Bar. This was the most food collected among any of the 50 or so participating firms and legal industry organizations this year.

Morning Wrap: FIFA’s Blatter Brings on McGuireWoods | Uber Driver Wins Case Repping Herself

By Katelyn Polantz |

FIFA chiefs have found U.S. attorneys, two cases against Silicon Valley see outcomes, plus a spotlight on Pittsburgh's legal market. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM and around the country.

Ballard Spahr offices in Washington, D.C.

Ballard Spahr Moves Firm's Bethesda Lawyers to D.C.

By Katelyn Polantz |

One of the only Big Law firms with a Montgomery County, Maryland, office has waved goodbye to everyday suburban bliss. Ballard Spahr moved its eight attorneys in the Bethesda, Maryland, office to D.C. in May.

Washington Lawyers’ Committee’s 2015 Branton Awards Luncheon, held at the Grand Hyatt Washington.  June 17, 2015.

Washington Lawyers' Committee Honors Pro Bono, Civil Rights Lawyers

By Happy Carlock |

Theodore Howard of Wiley Rein has long defended the rights of prisoners and fought against prison overcrowding across the country. John Relman of Relman, Dane & Colfax has championed the development of integrated communities in the fight for racial and economic justice.

Lawrence Robbins of Robbins, Russell, Englert, Orseck, Untereiner & Sauber (File photo: April 26, 2010)

Veteran Appellate Lawyer to Represent Ex-CIA Officer in Espionage Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Veteran appellate lawyer Lawrence Robbins will represent former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling as he appeals his espionage conviction for providing classified information to a New York Times reporter.

Google offices in New York's Chelsea neighborhood

Morning Wrap: Jenner Moves to Block Google Subpoenas | Sony Can't Shake Breach Suit

By Happy Carlock |

Jenner & Block fires back at Google's demand for documents. Sony loses round in a suit over last year's data breach. Sen. Bob Menendez must stand trial in the Garden State, a judge rules. And Judge Laurence Silberman of the D.C. Circuit isn't happy with the clarity of an agency's briefing. This is a news roundup from ALM and other publications.

Laurence Silberman.

D.C. Circuit Judge Irked by Agency's Briefs

By Zoe Tillman |

Judge Laurence Silberman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit values clarity in legal briefs. On Tuesday, the famously acronym-averse judge again showed his willingness to shame lawyers who disappoint him.

The American International Building, located in New York, NY.

Morning Wrap: Greenberg Wins | Goldberg Variations at SCOTUS

By Mike Sacks |

Former AIG CEO Maurice "Hank" Greenberg prevails in his suit against the Federal Reserve. Justice Antonin Scalia apologizes to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after flubbing her name. Republicans look for remedies in the event the Supreme Court rules against the federally subsidized health care exchanges. This is a roundup of news from ALM and other publications.

merger

Cohen Seglias Adds D.C. Presence Through Merger

By Lizzy McLellan |

Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman is set to enter the Washington market and launch a new practice group in internal investigations through a merger with a small firm. The firm announced Monday its plans to bring on four lawyers from Thaler Liebeler, effective June 29. The deal will allow Cohen Seglias to open an office in the nation's capital.

Iknoor Singh.

Army Must Allow Sikh Student to Enroll in ROTC, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

The Army cannot block a Sikh college student from enrolling in his school's ROTC program because he wears a turban and has long hair and a beard, a federal district judge in Washington has ruled.

Morning Wrap: RBG on 'Icon' Status | Lawsuit Threatens Gawker

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg addresses the American Constitution Society, The NLJ 350 Regional Report and the Mexico Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the American Constitution Society's annual national convention in Washington, D.C.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg 'Amazed' at Icon Status at 82

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reveled in her rock star status Saturday as she discussed her career and an upcoming movie about her life at the American Constitution Society's annual meeting in Washington. "It's amazing to think of me—an icon at 82?" Ginsburg exclaimed before a fan crowd of several hundred lawyers, law students and others in the final event of the convention.

Loretta Lynch.

Sotomayor to Swear in Lynch as Attorney General

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor will swear in Attorney General Loretta Lynch for a second time on June 17 at an investiture ceremony at the Warner Theatre in Washington. There is a long tradition of Supreme Court justices participating in such ceremonies.