Blog of Legal Times

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Loretta Lynch takes the stage, how U.S. prisons are dealing with an aging population and a public defender is detained.

Thom Tillis, left, and Loretta Lynch, right.

Lynch Pressed on Voting Laws at Confirmation Hearing

By Mike Sacks |

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., pressed attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch over her position on the state's controversial new voting laws, and at one point tried to show she’d contradicted herself.

Supreme Court of the United States

Justices May Release Foley Partner’s Response in Sanctions Case

By Tony Mauro |

A Foley & Lardner partner's response to sanctions threatened by the U.S. Supreme Court may be made public next month as the result of a surprise change in court policy.

Judge Patricia Millett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (2014)

D.C. Circuit's Patricia Millett Reflects on Clerking, Diversity

By Tony Mauro |

Judge Patricia Millett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit said Tuesday that if she were applying for a clerkship at her court now, she would not get the job because competition has become so intense. Millett said she seeks out diverse applicants, especially including those with military experience.

Mike Lee, left, and Patrick Leahy, right.

Trying Again on Electronic Communications Privacy Law

By Andrew Ramonas |

Sens. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and Mike Lee, R-Utah, on Wednesday vowed to reintroduce "in the coming weeks" legislation backed by the technology industry that would bar warrantless searches of personal emails and other data U.S. citizens put in the cloud.

Royce Lamberth.

Judge Weighs Sanctions in EPA Public Records Case

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal district judge in Washington is considering a request for sanctions against Environmental Protection Agency officials over their handling of a request for public records about decision-making leading up to the 2012 presidential election.

Jim Moran.

Former Rep. Jim Moran Plans to Bring Appropriations Lobbying to McDermott

By Katelyn Polantz |

Former Rep. Jim Moran of Virginia is joining McDermott Will & Emery, according to two people familiar with the hire. Moran’s announcement, likely to come in February, is another of the early movements of former members joining lobbying firms.

The Morning Wrap: Campus Rape Conviction

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and across the web: Vanderbilt football players convicted of rape; The New Yorker profiles food safety lawyer Bill Marler; the Mormon Church calls for LGBT protection.

Charles Grassley.

Grassley Readies the Gavel on Eve of Lynch Hearings

By Mike Sacks |

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, will gavel in his first hearing as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday morning. On the eve of having attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch in the hot seat, Grassley downplayed his career milestone.

Grocers Will Sell 168 Stores to Win Merger Approval

By Jenna Greene |

Supermarket chains Albertsons and Safeway will sell 168 stores in eight states to win approval of their $9.2 billion merger from the Federal Trade Commission, the agency said Tuesday.

Jack Abramoff.

Jack Abramoff Can’t Stop Feds From Seizing Tax Refunds, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Convicted former lobbyist Jack Abramoff has lost his bid to block the federal government from seizing nearly $450,000 in tax refunds he was set to receive.

Loretta Lynch.

Lynch Supporters, DOJ Critics Set to Testify at Confirmation Hearings

By Mike Sacks |

A former CBS reporter suing the U.S. Department of Justice, the founder of a voter-fraud watchdog group, two prominent D.C.-based law professors and a former U.S. attorney are among the nine witnesses set to testify on Thursday during Loretta Lynch’s nomination hearings.

Amy Mauser.

Boies Schiller Names New D.C. Administrative Partner

By Katelyn Polantz |

Amy Mauser, who worked alongside Boies Schiller founder David Boies on the Starr International trial last year, succeeds Mike Brille in the top job. Mauser’s promotion caps about two years of expansion at the litigation firm.

John Boehner.

Feds Ask Judge to Toss House Republicans' Obamacare Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

The Obama administration, fighting back Monday against House Republicans’ lawsuit over the federal health care law, argued that the legislators don't have standing to sue and that the case represents a clear violation of separation of powers.

Loretta Lynch.

Morning Wrap: Confirmation Clash | White House Drone Fallout

By Mike Scarcella |

Senate Republicans announce the witnesses scheduled to testify at Loretta Lynch's confirmation hearings. A federal appeals court upholds the campaign finance conviction of a prominent Nevada lawyer. A drone's unannounced visit at the White House is causing a few problems. This is a roundup of legal news from ALM and other publications.

Robert McDonnell.  July 9, 2013.

Ex-Virginia Gov. to Remain Free Pending Appeal

By Zoe Tillman |

Former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell has won his bid to remain free while he appeals his conviction on public corruption charges.

Banks Want Merchants to Chip in After a Data Breach

By Andrew Ramonas |

After President Barack Obama's calls this month for cybersecurity legislation, the finance sector is trying to ensure that banks and merchants share the legal and regulatory burden for consumer data protection.

Carmen Pittman was detained outside the U.S. Department of Justice on May 21, 2013, while participating in a protest.

Protester Sues Feds Over Claims of Unlawful Taser Use

By Zoe Tillman |

A woman restrained during a protest at the U.S. Department of Justice is suing the federal government, claiming an officer used excessive force by firing a Taser at her.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and around the web: cameras in the U.S. Supreme Court, going nuclear, drones and U.S. attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch’s letters.

U.S. Supreme Court

Secret Video of Supreme Court Protest is Released

By Tony Mauro and Zoe Tillman |

Secret video of Wednesday’s dramatic protest at the U.S. Supreme Court was posted online Friday night, giving the public a rare glimpse inside the court chamber. The video captures members of the organization 99Rise disrupting the court’s operations briefly but forcefully.

E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse.

National Security Prosecutor in Line for D.C. Federal Bench

By Zoe Tillman |

G. Michael Harvey, a veteran prosecutor with national security litigation experience, is in line to become the newest magistrate judge in Washington federal district court, according to people familiar with the process.

Mike Godwin.

Ex-Wikimedia Counsel Takes Libertarian Think Tank GC Job

By Andrew Ramonas |

Mike Godwin, a former top lawyer for Wikipedia operator Wikimedia Foundation Inc., will serve as the first general counsel and innovation policy director of the libertarian think tank R Street Institute, the Washington, D.C.-based group announced Thursday.

Venable Faces Malpractice Claims Over SEC Action

By Zoe Tillman |

The former target of a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation is suing Venable for malpractice over claims that the firm failed to take steps that would have prevented the agency from getting involved.

Morning Wrap: Which Firms Are Waiting on N.J. Bridgegate Payment?

By Katelyn Polantz |

This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. The legal community is reacting to firm news out of China and two firms are still waiting on payments from Gov. Chris Christie's Republican backers.

Harry Reid.

Reports: Harry Reid Demurs When Asked About an Exercise Injury Suit

By Zoe Tillman |

If Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is thinking about going to court over his New Year’s Day exercise equipment injury, he’s not tipping his hand.

William Baer.

DOJ Antitrust Division Nets $1.9B in Criminal Fines

By Katelyn Polantz |

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division raked in nearly $1.9 billion through criminal fines, especially against auto parts makers, in fiscal year 2014. The total almost doubles what the division levied in recent years.

Charles Grassley.

New Leadership and Name Changes for Judiciary Subcommittees

By Mike Sacks |

The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday announced its new subcommittee chairs and members. The subcommittee on the Constitution cut “civil rights and human rights” from its title under the Democratic majority.

CIA headquarters in McLean, Virginia.

Justice Dept. Defends Torture Report Secrecy

By Zoe Tillman |

When hundreds of pages of previously classified documents about the CIA’s detention and interrogation program were released late last year, certain sections were blacked out. The Justice Department now wants to keep the redactions in place—and block the disclosure of thousands of pages that were not published.

Morning Wrap: Wrong Person Gets Lawyer's Payment from Government

By Katelyn Polantz |

Law firm expansions planned for Kansas City and China, and an attorney who’s missing his $40,000: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country.

Judge Guts D.C.’s Suit Against Bank of America Over Fraud Scheme

By Zoe Tillman |

The District of Columbia government suffered a significant setback this month in its effort to hold Bank of America Corp. responsible for $48 million stolen by a former city employee in an elaborate fraud scheme. D.C. Superior Court Judge Frederick Weisberg dismissed the bulk of the city's claims against the bank.

Barack Obama.

No Patent Reform in Obama's SOTU, but There’s Still Hope

By Andrew Ramonas |

President Barack Obama in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night didn’t renew a call for patent litigation reform he made during the speech last year, dashing the hopes of some business groups and senior Republican lawmakers.

Demonstration outside the U.S. Supreme Court to bring attention to reconsideration of the Citizens United v. FEC decision.  February 23, 2012.

Supreme Court Session Disrupted by 'Citizens United' Protest

By Tony Mauro |

Protesters disrupted Wednesday morning's U.S. Supreme Court session, rising one after another to shout criticism of the court's Citizens United campaign finance decision on the occasion of its fifth anniversary.

Sally Rosenberg.

A Partner for Second Time, Lawyer Reflects on Diversity

By Katelyn Polantz |

Sally Rosenberg said she’s always believed that if you want something in your career, you should ask for it. Last year, she asked McDermott leaders if they could consider her for the partnership a second time.

The Morning Wrap: State of the Union by Issue

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM and around the web: the State of the Union; a win for Dish; the fallout from an insider trading decision.

U.S. Capitol.

State of the Union Address: Supreme Court Highlights

By Tony Mauro |

Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito Jr. skipped the president's remarks, which briefly touched on voting rights, gay marriage, health care and the continued detention of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay.

Elizabeth Baird.

Morgan Lewis Makes Former Bingham Partner Cohead of D.C. Office

By Katelyn Polantz |

Elizabeth Baird, formerly of Bingham McCutchen, will join Grace Speights in sharing the top job at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius' D.C. office. The promotion is among the combined firm’s first public moves in Washington to integrate recently acquired Bingham lawyers.

Demonstration of the DJI Inspire 1 drone in flight recording video during the Small UAV Coalition Tech Fair, held at the National Press Club on Tuesday, January 20, 2015.

Amazon and Google Drone Lobbying Group Seeks FAA Rules

By Andrew Ramonas |

As the U.S. government drafts rules for the use of commercial drones, Amazon.com Inc., Google Inc. and other backers of the unmanned aircraft are working to ensure they are on the radar of federal lawmakers and regulators.

Thomas Motley, left, and John Mott, right.

Two D.C. Judges Up for Reappointment

By Zoe Tillman |

Judges Thomas Motley and John Mott of the District of Columbia Superior Court are seeking their second 15-year appointments to the bench. Also, the D.C. Judicial Nomination Commission is looking for a new executive director.

Samuel Alito Jr.

Justices Rule for Inmate in Dispute Over Beard Length

By Tony Mauro |

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with a Muslim inmate in Arkansas in his challenge to a prison rule that barred him from wearing a half-inch beard for religious reasons.

Jim Matheson.

Former Utah Rep Joins Squire Patton Boggs

By Katelyn Polantz |

Retired Utah Congressman Jim Matheson will join Squire Patton Boggs' public policy practice in Washington, the firm announced Tuesday. Matheson, who left Congress at the end of 2014, will become a principal at the firm.

Antonin Scalia.

Morning Wrap: From Law School to Congress, High-Court Sarcasm, the SEC's Winning Streak

By Mike Scarcella |

A look at the law schools that have sent the most alumni to Congress. Justice Scalia wins for most sarcastic justice. Police agencies are using handheld radars to "see" inside homes. This is a roundup of legal news from ALM publications and other sites.

Loretta Lynch.

Loretta Lynch Confirmation Hearing Dates Set

By Zoe Tillman |

The confirmation hearings for attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch are set for Jan. 28 and 29, Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, announced late Friday.

Outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day the Court issued its decisions in key cases regarding the Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California's same-sex marriage ban Proposition 8.  June 26, 2013.

Supreme Court Grants Review of Same-Sex Marriage Cases

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, stepping into a historic legal, political and social debate, agreed on Friday to decide whether states can prohibit same-sex marriages without violating the federal Constitution.

Feds Reveal New Details About Secret Database of Phone Records

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice, forced by a judge to reveal information about a secret law enforcement database of phone records, on Thursday disclosed new details about the now-defunct data-collection program.

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation headquarters building.

FDIC Picks Congressional Lawyer for GC Role

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has turned to Capitol Hill for a general counsel, tapping Charles Yi, a former senior congressional staffer, for the job.

Emmet Sullivan.

Judge Blasts D.C. Prosecutors for Overstepping Subpoena Authority

By Zoe Tillman |

Comparing federal prosecutors to school children who make bad excuses to avoid detention, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan in Washington this week found that the government had overstepped its authority in subpoenaing jailhouse phone records and visitor logs.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: a crackdown in France on speech supporting terrorism, a defense contractor pleads guilty to bribery and BP catches a break.

New Coalition Pushes for Patent Litigation Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

Amazon.com Inc., Google Inc., Macy's Inc. and 31 other organizations have banded together to push Congress to pass legislation that curbs the litigious power of patent trolls.

Samuel Alito Jr.

In Philadelphia, Alito Reminisces About Influential Appeals Judge

By Tony Mauro |

It was a homecoming of sorts for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Jr. on Thursday as he reminisced about Philadelphia and his friendship with one of its famous sons, the late appeals court judge Edward Becker, “a man who made a big difference in my life.”

U.S. Department of Justice.

Feds Take Pro-Israel Group's IRS Suit to DC Circuit

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Department of Justice is challenging a Washington federal trial judge’s ruling to keep alive a suit that a pro-Israel advocacy group brought over alleged Internal Revenue Service discrimination.

Morning Wrap: A Settlement and 'Serial'

By Katelyn Polantz |

Apple, Google and other tech companies have reached a settlement on a major antitrust case, and “Serial’s” Adnan Syed awaits an appeals judge’s ruling: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country.

Richard Leon.

Judge Invalidates Another Piece of Home Care Worker Wage Regulations

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington for the second time in a month struck down a piece of U.S. Department of Labor regulations intended to expand minimum-wage and overtime protections for home care workers.

U.S. Capitol.

Portman Chief of Staff Hire Builds Out Wilmer’s Lobbying Plan

By Katelyn Polantz |

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr doubled the leadership of its lobbying group Wednesday, with the hiring of Sen. Rob Portman’s former chief of staff, Rob Lehman. The move bolsters a practice area that Wilmer had maintained in relative obscurity until the past few years.

Thomas Donohue.

Chamber of Commerce Getting Down to Business for 2015

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is on a mission this year to change the Affordable Care Act, help companies share information about cyberthreats and fix problems it sees in the U.S. legal system, Chamber president Thomas Donohue said Wednesday.

The Morning Wrap: A Win for Consumers at the High Court

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM and around the web: The U.S. Supreme Court rules for consumers in a mortgage case; Dodd-Frank under attack; JPMorgan's profits fall as legal costs top $1 billion.

What’s a Firm to Do With a Former Congressman? Send Him to Canada

By Katelyn Polantz |

McKenna Long & Aldridge has hired former Democratic U.S. Rep. Bill Owens as a part-time strategic adviser. That’s fairly standard for a Congressman-turned-lobbyist. But it’s Owens’ connections along the U.S.-Canada border McKenna really wants.

Barack Obama.

White House Offering Cybersecurity Info Sharing Plan

By Andrew Ramonas |

President Barack Obama on Tuesday will release a plan to encourage the public and private sectors to share cyberthreat details with each other, giving companies "targeted liability protection" for their information, according to the White House.

Antonin Scalia.

Supreme Court Justices Get Stuck in Traffic, Too

By Tony Mauro |

Even U.S. Supreme Court justices get stuck in traffic. Justice Antonin Scalia was absent from the court briefly at the beginning of Tuesday's court session, delayed because of a traffic accident that caused lengthy backups on several routes into D.C. from Virginia, where the justice lives.

The government's case against Ted Stevens, seen here in 2008, fell apart over allegations of prosecutorial misconduct. In the aftermath, DOJ put together a criminal discovery guide book. The manual is now at the center of a FOIA lawsuit in Washington.

Suspensions Voided for Two Ted Stevens Prosecutors

By Zoe Tillman |

Top U.S. Department of Justice officials violated policy in suspending two prosecutors involved in the botched case against former Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens, the Merit Systems Protection Board ruled this month in declaring the discipline invalid.

Robert McDonnell.  July 9, 2013.

Judge Orders Former Va. Governor Jailed During Appeal

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Virginia has rejected Bob McDonnell's bid to remain free while he appeals his conviction. McDonnell, the former Virginia governor, was sentenced to two years in prison on corruption charges.

Kamala Harris (2011)

Morning Wrap: Kamala Harris to Run for Senate; DOJ Runs From Reporter Subpoena

By Mike Scarcella |

Kamala Harris prepares to announce her Senate bid, prosecutors back off from forcing a NYT reporter to testify at trial and the justices continue the waiting game over whether to review the constitutionality of same-sex marriage. This is a roundup of legal news from ALM and other publications.

David O’Neil.

Debevoise Hires a Top Justice Dept. Lawyer

By Katelyn Polantz |

David O’Neil, a top U.S. Department of Justice lawyer who temporarily led the Criminal Division last year, will join Debevoise as a partner.

Robert Luskin.

Bob Luskin’s Move From Squire Patton Boggs Accompanies Firm Changes

By Katelyn Polantz |

One of Squire Patton Boggs’ highest-profile litigators in the U.S., Robert Luskin, will leave the firm with five of his partners for Paul Hastings, three people familiar with the move said Monday.

E. Barrett Prettyman Court House.

Judge Refuses to Halt False-Claims Case Against KBR

By Andrew Ramonas |

A federal judge in Washington is trying to move forward a long-running whistleblower case as KBR Inc. appeals orders that require the contractor to disclose certain internal papers.

Ronald Machen.

D.C. Prosecutors Name Legal Team to Review Wrongful Conviction Claims

By Zoe Tillman |

Two lawyers serving as "independent consultants" will review wrongful conviction claims against the U.S. attorney’s office in Washington, the office announced on Monday.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and around the web: More law jobs, the Washington Redskins trademark case, legal fees for same-sex marriage cases and intellectual property lawyers on the move.

Squire Patton Boggs Billing Inconsistency Ends With Settlement

By Katelyn Polantz |

A bankruptcy trustee has settled with Squire Patton Boggs after accusing legacy firm Patton Boggs of lowballing the amount it earned from a client.

Wayne Gretzky, Chicago, Illinois, 1997.

Law Firms Must Find ‘Where the Puck is Going to Be,' Study Says

By Katelyn Polantz |

While many law firms have felt the jolt of a shrinking industry, their partners might be too comfortable to incite real change. That’s what Georgetown University Law Center’s Center for the Study of the Legal Profession argues in its 2015 report.

The Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol.

House Passes ACA Measure Redefining Full-Time Worker

By Andrew Ramonas |

Despite opposition from President Barack Obama, the House has passed legislation to modify a key Affordable Care Act provision, drawing applause from the business community.

Feds Take Stance Against Washington Redskins in Trademark Fight

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice is jumping into the court fight over the cancellation of the Washington Redskins’ trademarks. The department will defend against the team's constitutional challenge to a section of federal trademark law.

Takata airbag components on view before a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing titled “Examining Takata Airbag Defects and the Vehicle Recall Process.” November 20, 2014.

Squire Patton Boggs to Lobby for Takata Corp.

By Andrew Ramonas |

Squire Patton Boggs has registered to lobby for embattled Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp.

John Ferren.

Two D.C. Senior Judges Up for Reappointment

By Zoe Tillman |

Two senior judges in the District of Columbia’s local courts—Judge John Ferren of the Court of Appeals and Judge Frederick Dorsey of Superior Court—are seeking reappointment.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and around the web: Wisconsin voter ID law goes up to the U.S. Supreme Court, sentencing for London imam convicted of terrorism charges and a new fraud chief at the Justice Department.

Chiquita Plaintiffs Take Alien Tort Case to High Court

By Scott Flaherty |

Months after a federal appeals court rejected efforts to hold Chiquita Brands International Inc. liable for facilitating war crimes in Colombia, human rights lawyers have turned to the U.S. Supreme Court in hopes of resurrecting their claims under the beleaguered Alien Tort Statute.

Jon Kyl.

Former Lawmakers, Staffers Now Free to Lobby

By Andrew Ramonas |

The start of the new Congress could bring new business to nearly two dozen former federal lawmakers and congressional staffers who have left Capitol Hill since 2013, if they can stomach the oft-maligned title of lobbyist.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building.

Lawyer Fighting the SEC Finds Skeptical DC Circuit Panel

By Jenna Greene |

Washington lawyer Brynee Baylor appeared to make little headway convincing a three-judge panel at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Thursday that she was duped by her client to help peddle an investment scam.

Lisa Blatt.

Challenge to Wisconsin Voter ID Law Heads to Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

Civil rights advocates are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to use a Wisconsin law as a vehicle to take a fresh look at whether strict voter ID laws violate the Constitution or the Voting Rights Act.

Morning Wrap: Chambliss joins DLA Piper, Pattons Give Art

By Katelyn Polantz |

The next steps for Bob McDonnell, Patton Boggs’ founder’s art collection and a former Senator from Georgia. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Lewis Rose.

In First, New Kelley Drye Managing Partner is Based in D.C.

By Katelyn Polantz |

Kelley Drye & Warren’s new managing partner will be based out of the Washington office for the first time, but that doesn’t mean much will change at the firm. Lewis Rose, a 57-year-old advertising lawyer, assumed the job on Jan. 1.

U.S. Capitol.

Congress Moves to Redefine 'Full-time' for Health Care

By Andrew Ramonas |

Republican lawmakers in Washington are forging ahead with legislation to change a key requirement of the Affordable Care Act, setting up a potential showdown between the new GOP-controlled Congress and President Barack Obama over his signature health care law.

Loretta Lynch.

Loretta Lynch Renominated, No Hearing Date Yet

By Mike Sacks |

At the start of the 114th Congress, President Barack Obama on Wednesday resubmitted the nomination of Loretta Lynch for U.S. attorney general.

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, center, with attorney Henry “Hank” Asbill, left, composes himself as he addresses the media outside federal court in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015.

Round Two: Bob McDonnell Lawyer Previews the Appeal

By Zoe Tillman |

Former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell’s lawyers are wasting no time taking his public corruption conviction to a federal appeals court. A lead member of McDonnell's defense team, Jones Day partner Henry "Hank" Asbill, spoke to The National Law Journal about what issues they intend to raise in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

The Morning Wrap: The Prince, the Lawyer and the Sex Suit

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and around the web: the latest legal strike in a suit involving Prince Andrew and Alan Dershowitz; former Gov. Robert McDonnell sentenced; Kirby Delauter.

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell arrives at federal court for sentencing in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015.

Former Va. Governor Gets Two Years for Public Corruption

By Zoe Tillman and Mike Scarcella |

A federal judge in Virginia on Tuesday sentenced former Gov. Robert McDonnell to two years in prison on public corruption charges.

Steven Benjamin, past president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

House Judiciary Committee Gets Broader Jurisdiction After Rule Change

By Marcia Coyle |

The House of Representatives late Tuesday gave final approval to a rules change that gives the House Judiciary Committee jurisdiction over any bill proposing or modifying a new or existing criminal law or penalty.

Leo Rydzewski.

Financial Planning Regulator Finds Its First GC in DC

By Andrew Ramonas |

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc., the nongovernmental regulator of U.S. financial planners, has hired its first general counsel, snagging Washington lawyer Leo Rydzewski from Holland & Knight for the job, the organization announced Tuesday.

Bob McDonnell.

Dear Judge: Letters From Lawyers in Support of Bob McDonnell

By Mike Scarcella |

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell will be sentenced Tuesday on public corruption charges. His lawyers filed hundreds of pages of letters in support of leniency. Here are a handful of letters, from lawyers, in support of McDonnell.

Morning Wrap: Same-Sex Marriage in Florida, Bob McDonnell Sentencing, Grand Jury Gag

By Mike Scarcella |

Same-sex marriages begin in Florida, a New York Times reporter takes the stand in a CIA leak case, and Bob McDonnell prepares for sentencing today: This is a roundup of legal news from ALM publications and other outlets.

Feds Settle Trademark Suit Over 'myRA' Program

By Zoe Tillman |

The federal government has agreed to a financial settlement in a trademark dispute over the Obama administration’s "myRA" retirement services program, according to a lawyer for the private company that filed suit. The amount was not immediately disclosed.

Jennifer Safavian.

Retail Group Restocks Its Top Lobbyist Spot

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Retail Industry Leaders Association has filled its top lobbying job in Washington, D.C., with Jennifer Safavian, a lawyer who most recently served as a senior aide to congressional Republicans.

CSX Fights Subpoena in Capitol Hill Tunnel Dispute

By Zoe Tillman |

CSX Transportation Inc. is fighting a subpoena for documents about a controversial plan to rebuild a section of its rail network running through a Washington neighborhood.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM publications and around the web: the U.S. Supreme Court's electronic filing system, John Hinckley Jr., former Sen. Edward Brooke and North Korea.

No Charges Against Hinckley for Death of James Brady

By Mike Scarcella |

Federal prosecutors in Washington announced Friday they will not charge John Hinckley Jr. in connection to the shooting death of James Brady.

Mario Cuomo

The Day Mario Cuomo Visited the Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

Former New York Governor Mario Cuomo, who died on Thursday at age 82, almost became a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court in 1993. Sixteen years later, Cuomo visited the high court and reflected on what could have been.

John Roberts Jr.

Chief Justice Roberts Promises Greater Access to Court Filings

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court is developing an electronic filing system that will make all case filings available to the public online, Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. announced in his annual year-end report issued Wednesday. Roberts said the new system “may be operational as soon as 2016."

Scott Bloch.

DC Bar Suspends Scott Bloch, Citing California Sanction

By Andrew Ramonas |

Scott Bloch, a former head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, received a temporary D.C. Bar suspension this week following a disciplinary action against him in California.

J. Michael Farren after his arrest in 2010.

Disbarment Recommended for Former White House Lawyer

By Andrew Ramonas |

Former White House lawyer J. Michael Farren should lose his license to practice law in Washington following his conviction for attempted murder, a professional responsibility panel for lawyers has advised the D.C. Court of Appeals.

The Morning Wrap: Harvard Law Mishandled Sexual Harassment Complaints

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM publications and around the web: Harvard Law and sexual harassment; $1 billion divorce appeal; Pom wins a round.

Venable, ACLU Earn $590K in Legal Fees in Racial-Profiling Dispute

By Katelyn Polantz |

A Baltimore County circuit court judge last week awarded three Venable partners and an attorney from the American Civil Liberties Union $590,000 for their pro bono work for the Maryland State Conference of NAACP Branches.

Jonathan Cohn.

Business Groups Press Challenge Over SEC Conflict-Minerals Rule

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other business groups are urging the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to reaffirm its opposition to a federal securities rule that requires publicly traded companies to disclose the source of certain minerals.