Blog of Legal Times

Leondra Reid Kruger

DOJ Lawyer Leondra Kruger Picked for Calif. Supreme Court

By Cheryl Miller |

Gov. Jerry Brown will nominate U.S. Department of Justice attorney Leondra Kruger to the California Supreme Court later today, sources familiar with the decision told The Recorder. Kruger, 38, has served as acting principal deputy U.S. solicitor general and has argued more than 10 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Larry Craig.

Larry Craig Takes Campaign-Funds Fight to D.C. Circuit

By Zoe Tillman |

Former U.S. Sen. Larry Craig is appealing an order that requires him to pay back hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign funds he used to pay legal bills.

Former Law Firm Partner Convicted in Child Pornography Case Faces Disbarment

By Zoe Tillman |

A former Hunton & Williams partner is facing disbarment in the District of Columbia six years after he was convicted of using his law firm computer to download child pornography.

Headquarters of the Securities and Exchange Commission

SEC Looks the Other Way on Political Spend Disclosure

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has declined to make the disclosure of corporate political spending a priority for next year, despite mounting pressure by a law professor and his supporters to put the matter back on the agency's agenda.

Hunton & Williams Picks Up U.S. Attorney Tim Heaphy of Virginia

By Katelyn Polantz |

Timothy Heaphy, U.S. attorney for the Western District of Virginia, will join Hunton & Williams to lead its white-collar investigations unit. The U.S. Department of Justice announced on Monday Heaphy had told the president and attorney general he would step down.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration reform, a new home for about 750 Bingham McCutchen lawyers and staffers, lobbying in the Republican-controlled Congress and the incoming chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Peter Shields.

Wiley Rein Says It Will Close on Lobbying Acquisition This Year

By Katelyn Polantz |

Wiley Rein said Friday afternoon it planned to acquire all of McBee Strategic Consulting, a lobby shop recently deserted by its founder for a job leading a New Jersey-based energy company. The acquisition isn’t yet a done deal. A number of McBee employees continue to interview for jobs with other lobby shops.

Rachel Thomas, vice president of government affairs for the Direct Marketing Association, during a panel discussion titled: “Cyberattacks, Data Breaches, and Serial Litigation – Should Federal Data Security Legislation be on Congress’ Horizon?

Corporate Call for National Data Breach Standards

By Andrew Ramonas |

As a new Congress prepares to take over in January, advocates for Google Inc., credit-reporting company Experian PLC and other users of consumer data on Friday urged federal lawmakers to approve a national standard for notifying customers of corporate data breaches.

Herbert Dixon, Jr.

D.C. Superior Court’s ‘Technology Judge’ To Retire in 2015

By Zoe Tillman |

Judge Herbert Dixon Jr., known as the “technology judge” in the District of Columbia Superior Court, is set to retire next spring after 30 years on the bench.

Rosemary Collyer.

Judge in Obamacare Suit Presided Over Drone, Voting Rights Cases

By Zoe Tillman |

Judge Rosemary Collyer, a 12-year veteran of the federal district court in Washington, was assigned on Friday to hear House Republicans’ legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act.

John Boehner.

House Republicans Challenge Health Care Law in Court

By Zoe Tillman |

House Republicans on Friday filed a long-threatened lawsuit challenging certain provisions of the Obama administration's signature health care reform law.

Mark Filip.

U. Va. Reverses Decision on Lawyer to Lead Review of Sex Assault Policies

By Tony Mauro |

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring announced Friday morning that Kirkland & Ellis partner Mark Filip will not lead the study of sexual assault policies at the University of Virginia. The announcement came just hours after Filip was picked last night.

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh C. Johnson

Morning Wrap: Obama Moves on Immigration Plan, First Lawsuit Filed

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Obama unveils his immigration plan, law enforcement drug-house stings face scrutiny, Uber hires Hogan to quiet privacy uproar, New York prosecutors probe payday lenders.

U.S. Department of Justice.

Justice Dept. Affirms Obama Immigration Plan

By Zoe Tillman |

The arm of the U.S. Department of Justice that provides legal advice to the executive branch reviewed and approved the Obama administration’s immigration reform proposal, according to a memo the department released Thursday.

(l-r) Joel Jankowsky, Don Pongrace, and Jorge Lopez Jr., of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld.

Akin Gump Lobbying Deal Blooms From DLA Departures

By Katelyn Polantz |

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld is again a winner during a lobbying practice shakeup, this time creating a strategic partnership with consultants who’ve left DLA Piper: Kristen Ratcliff and Krista Drobac, who founded Sirona Strategies this month.

Clarence Thomas.

Justices Refuse to Block S.C. Same-Sex Marriage Over Scalia, Thomas Dissent

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday turned down a request from South Carolina to halt same-sex marriages there. Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas voted in support of the application to stay.

Williams & Connolly Loses Three Partners

By Katelyn Polantz |

Three partners—former Ambassador Laurie Fulton, Lisa Duggan and Dennis Black—have left Williams & Connolly in the latter half of 2014, an anomaly at the tight-knit firm.

Morning Wrap: Wiley Rein's McBee Talks Ongoing, NYPD Loses Secrecy Argument

By Katelyn Polantz |

Wiley Rein, Eric Cantor’s team and the attorney general of Missouri all consider changes in the lobbying industry: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit nlj.com and law.com.

Wiley Rein Nears Deal With McBee Strategic Lobbyists

By Katelyn Polantz |

Wiley Rein has been in talks to acquire McBee lobbyists, likely as a subsidiary, and a deal could be finalized by the end of the month. The McBee Strategic lobbyists received offer letters from a law firm late Monday night.

DOJ Wins Suit Over Contract for Terrorist Screening Center

By Nate Beck |

A federal judge Tuesday dismissed a company’s claims that a competitor’s low-bid $59.3 million offer to staff a terrorist screening center violated bidding regulations.

(l-r) Brett Kavanaugh, Judith Rogers, and Nina Pillard.

D.C. Circuit Saves Merits of CFPB Challenges for Another Day

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit spent several hours on Wednesday weighing whether corporations and state attorneys general had legal standing to challenge the existence of the federal Consumer Financial Protection Board, the merits of their challenges notwithstanding.

Eric Holder Jr.

Feds Collect $24.7B in Penalties—Mostly From Big Banks

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Department of Justice in fiscal 2014 secured $24.7 billion from its cases, more than tripling its haul from fiscal 2013, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. announced Wednesday.

NSA Surveillance Reform Bill a Bust in Senate Vote

By Andrew Ramonas |

Technology industry and civil liberties groups are in mourning after the Senate on Tuesday night all but killed legislation intended to curb National Security Agency surveillance powers.

Morning Wrap: South Carolina Seeks Marriage Stay, Keystone Rejected and Lady Gaga

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: South Carolina requests a stay on same-sex marriages; the Keystone Pipeline falls short in the Senate; Obama may hold off deporting undocumented parents of U.S. citizens.

Bob Goodlatte.

Optimistic Outlook for Patent Reform in 2015

By Andrew Ramonas |

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, on Tuesday assured the business community that congressional efforts to fight patent trolls will continue in 2015, saying he expects lawmakers to resume work on patent litigation reform "very early" in the next Congress.

U.S. Department of Justice.

DOJ Watchdog Wants Greater Attorney Ethics Oversight

By Zoe Tillman |

Investigating allegations of attorney misconduct—and giving transparency to the process—continue to pose challenges for the U.S. Department of Justice, according to a new report by the department’s independent inspector general.

Jonathan Turley.

Law Prof Jonathan Turley Takes Up Boehner Suit

By Mike Sacks |

Jonathan Turley is taking over as lead counsel in House Speaker John Boehner’s yet-to-be-filed lawsuit against President Barack Obama’s executive actions. The hiring of Turley comes after two other firms—Quinn Emanuel and Baker & Hostetler—backed out of pursuing any case.

Erik Autor.

Mayer Brown, DOJ Fight Over Fees in Lobbyists’ Case

By Andrew Ramonas |

Mayer Brown and the U.S. Department of Justice are quarreling in Washington federal district court over whether lobbyists who prevailed in a closely watched case against the Obama administration should get legal fees.

Douglas Gansler.

Maryland AG Douglas Gansler to Join BuckleySandler

By Marcia Coyle |

Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler will head to the Washington office of BuckleySandler when he finishes his second term of office in January.

Peter Keisler.

The Morning Wrap: AT&T Amicus Brief on Cell Tracking, and Morgan Lewis' 'Hybrid' Approach to Growth

By Mike Scarcella |

A roundup of legal news from ALM and other publications, including: AT&T's data privacy amicus brief in the Eleventh Circuit; a Baltimore judge gets irked over surveillance, and Morgan Lewis' growth strategy.

Patrick Leahy.

Near but Uncertain Future for USA Freedom Act

By Andrew Ramonas |

Google Inc., Microsoft Corp., Yahoo! Inc. and other technology companies have put new pressure on federal lawmakers to approve legislation intended to rein in National Security Agency surveillance practices as the full Senate prepares to take up the bill this week.

Federal Circuit Pick Already a Familiar Face to Court

By Scott Graham |

Federal Circuit nominee Kara Stoll has a lot going for her: a successful patent appellate practice at an Am Law 100 firm, strong connections in Washington and the patent bar, and a reputation for playing well with others—a valuable asset for a court with a history of factiousness.

Covington & Burling's revamped logo is displayed outside the firm's new Washington, D.C. offices at CityCenterDC.

Two Major Firms Finalize Office Moves

By Katelyn Polantz |

Covington & Burling and Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman will move into new office buildings Dec. 8, shifting two large chunks of the Washington legal community into different neighborhoods in one weekend.

Emmet Sullivan.

Ted Stevens Case Looms Over DOJ's Handling of Alleged FBI Misconduct

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan, in his own words, doesn’t play around when it comes to prosecutors’ obligation to turn over favorable evidence to defense lawyers—he presided over the prosecution of the late Sen. Ted Stevens, which collapsed amid revelations that prosecutors withheld information. That legacy has loomed large over recent proceedings before Sullivan about an FBI agent's alleged misconduct.

U.S. Department of Justice.

DOJ: No FCPA Jeopardy in This Corporate Acquisition

By Andrew Ramonas |

A U.S. corporation's planned acquisition of a foreign company received the blessing of U.S. Department of Justice lawyers tasked with vetting the businesses for potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, according to a DOJ opinion released Friday.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Loretta Lynch's past, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius partner additions, the effects of a 1996 death-penalty appeals law and surprise Drug Enforcement Administration inspections for the National Football League.

Bill Nelson.

Takata Called to Capitol Hill Over Air Bag Safety

By Andrew Ramonas |

Senators next week plan to put embattled Takata Corp. under the microscope, holding a hearing on the Japanese company's air bag safety defect that allegedly caused five deaths and prompted a U.S. criminal investigation and class action lawsuits.

Tom Carper.

Sen. Carper Urges Action on D.C. Court Nominees

By Zoe Tillman |

Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., this week called the Senate’s delay in voting on pending judicial nominees for the District of Columbia’s local courts one of “many injustices” faced by the city because of its lack of control over local affairs.

Nina Pillard.

D.C. Circuit Rejects Religious Nonprofits' Challenge to Health Care Law

By Zoe Tillman |

A group of religious nonprofits on Friday lost its challenge to the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive coverage regulations.

Royce Lamberth.

Judge Who Defended Military Grooming Policies Recuses in New Case

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Senior Judge Royce Lamberth hasn’t practiced law since he joined the bench in 1987, but he decided this week that his past experience defending military grooming policies required him to back out of a case recently assigned to him.

Tech Companies, Songwriters Air Competing Concerns Over Copyright Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

In-house counsel for eBay Inc., Google Inc. and the National Music Publishers' Association agreed Thursday that the U.S. copyright system needs improvement, but they offered different views about how to approach reform.

Clarence Thomas.

Morning Wrap: Justices Alito, Scalia, Thomas Pick Bones on Marriage, Free Speech, Magna Carta

By Katelyn Polantz |

Justices speak to conservatives and President Obama plans for immigration policy changes: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

E. Barrett Prettyman Court House.

Wilmer's Randy Moss Confirmed to D.C. Federal Trial Bench

By Mike Sacks |

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Randolph Moss to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia by a 54-45 vote. Moss faced resistance from Republicans, who took issue with statements he made in private practice supporting campaign finance reform and gun control.

Loretta Lynch.

Loretta Lynch on Voting Rights, Terror Trials and the Press

By Mike Sacks |

Loretta Lynch’s confirmation can turn as much on what she will say as on what she has said. Here's a look at past remarks on topics that include voting rights, terror trials and relations with the press.

Terror Victims Can’t Claim Domains to Satisfy Judgments, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Victims of terror attacks and their families have been largely unsuccessful in collecting billions of dollars in damages from state sponsors of terrorism. Earlier this week, a group of plaintiffs hit another roadblock when a federal judge in Washington ruled they couldn’t go after Internet domain identifiers to satisfy those judgments.

Antonin Scalia.

Magna Carta 101 With Justice Scalia

By Andrew Ramonas |

Justice Antonin Scalia on Thursday, addressing the annual Federalist Society convention in Washington, gives a history lesson on the Magna Carta.

Peter Shields.

Wiley Rein Mum on Any Lobby Shop Acquisition

By Katelyn Polantz |

Is Wiley Rein in talks to acquire a portion of the lobby shop McBee Strategic? Jim Slattery of Wiley Rein declined to comment on the possibility of the acquisition. “In the next year we’re going to be making a series of strategic hires,” Slattery told the NLJ.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Recent Supreme Court movements, Jones Day’s recent success and a Page Six flame war: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. October 30, 2014. Photo by Jenna Greene/NLJ.

Finnegan Litigator Tapped for Federal Circuit Seat

By Patience Haggin |

Kara Farnandez Stoll, a partner at Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett and Dunner in Washington, was nominated Wednesday to a seat on the Federal Circuit.

Sonia Sotomayor.

Supreme Court Lifts Stay on Kansas Same-Sex Marriages

By Tony Mauro and Marcia Coyle |

Over the dissent of two justices, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed same-sex marriages to go forward in Kansas.

Merrick Garland.

D.C. Circuit Puts Latest Health Care Challenge on Hold

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal appeals court in Washington will not wade into the latest fight over the federal health care reform law until the U.S. Supreme Court rules.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: A costly paralegal's slip-up at Squire Patton Boggs; five banks settle FX rigging charges; a Georgetown rabbi is due in court.

New Campaign Targets Supreme Court Accountability

By Tony Mauro |

A new organization targeting the U.S. Supreme Court over transparency will soon air television ads that describe the court as the "most powerful, least accountable" government institution.

LSAT Prep Company Ordered to Pay $927K in Legal Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

A test prep company has been ordered to pay more than $900,000 in legal fees and costs to plaintiffs who accused the company of violating District of Columbia consumer protection laws.

Samuel Alito Jr. receiving the Learned Hand Medal at the FBC 2010 Law Day Dinner.  May 4, 2010.

Alito Blocks Broadcast Coverage of Federalist Society Talk

By Tony Mauro |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Jr.’s speech to the Federalist Society lawyers’ convention on Thursday will be closed to broadcast media, the group announced on Tuesday.

Career Fair Planned For Lawyers in Military Service

By Katelyn Polantz |

Washington will host a first-of-its-kind legal career fair for military veterans next year, Orrick announced Tuesday. The fair will take place May 1 and May 2.

Sonia Sotomayor.

The Morning Wrap

By Mike Scarcella |

A roundup of news from ALM publications and other media outlets, including: Kansas takes same-sex marriage to the U.S. Supreme Court; an Oklahoma businessman's billion-dollar divorce settlement; and a judge reverses himself in a prior restraint dispute in Georgia.

Tom Daschle.

Daschle Group Snags Three DLA Lobbyists

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Daschle Group at Baker Donelson is beginning to take shape. The firm said Monday that three DLA Piper lobbyists will join former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle’s new group.

Barack Obama.

Taking Sides For and Against Obama's Net Neutrality Plan

By Andrew Ramonas |

President Barack Obama put telecommunications and cable companies in his crosshairs Monday, calling on the Federal Communications Commission to defend a free and open Internet by regulating broadband service like a public utility.

(l-r) Brett Kavanaugh, Judith Rogers, and Merrick Garland.

Ex-House Aide Asks Full D.C. Circuit to Hear Case

By Mike Scarcella |

A former House aide convicted for taking illegal gratuities from Jack Abramoff’s lobbying group wants the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to review the case.

Damon Smith.

Former Top Lawyer at HUD Joins Jenner & Block

By Andrew Ramonas |

A former top legal adviser to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has joined the Washington office of Jenner & Block, the firm announced Monday.

Charles Grassley.

Grassley Outlines Approach to Judicial Confirmations

By Mike Sacks |

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the presumptive chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, on Monday outlined his leadership plans—including his vow to confirm “consensus” nominations to the federal judiciary.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: President Barack Obama nominates U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch as the next U.S. attorney general, a U.S. Supreme Court review of same-sex marriages seems nearly inevitable, the legal industry picks up jobs and the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating an influx of drones.

Claire McCaskill.

Criminal Charges for Takata Over Air Bag Issues?

By Andrew Ramonas |

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., on Friday pushed the U.S. Department of Justice to think about filing criminal charges against Takata Corp. after a media report indicated that the Japanese manufacturer intentionally concealed information about a safety defect with its air bags.

Gerald Fisher.

Prosecutors Accused of Failing to Preserve Emails in Chandra Levy Case

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice may have deleted emails related to the Chandra Levy case that it was supposed to save, according to new court papers filed by lawyers for the man convicted of Levy’s murder.

Wiley Rein Parts Ways With Bankruptcy Group

By Brian Baxter |

The Washington, D.C.-based firm confirmed a decision to separate its eight-lawyer bankruptcy and financial restructuring practice following a strategic review.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the Sixth Circuit upholds same-sex marriage laws, a forthcoming ruling on the Detroit bankruptcy plan and sentencing related to the Boston Marathon bombings put on hold.

Robert Litt.

Intelligence Agency GCs Seek Surveillance Transparency

By Andrew Ramonas |

Top intelligence agency lawyers said on Thursday that the U.S. government can do more to increase the transparency of surveillance activities that have drawn rebukes from the technology industry and the public at large after the revelations by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Navajo Nation's flag with Arizona state and U.S. flags.

The Check Is In The Mail for Navajo Nation, BuckleySandler

By Jenna Greene |

It’s almost payday for the Navajo Nation—and BuckleySandler. The federal government on Wednesday greenlighted a payment of $554 million to settle charges that the Department of the Interior failed to properly manage, invest and account for tribal trust funds

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: indictments dismissed because of possible misconduct by an FBI agent, men with a drone arrested near a nuclear site and a reprimand for a Federal Circuit lawyer.

President Barack Obama answers questions during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Washington.

Obama: No Decision Yet on Pick to Replace Eric Holder

By Mike Sacks |

President Obama on Wednesday, addressing reporters about the midterm elections and his agenda, didn't give any hints on the timing of his pick to replace Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. And he didn't give up any names.

John Facciola.

Judge Criticizes Handling of Evidence in Mass Protest Case

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal magistrate judge issued a report this week criticizing the Metropolitan Police Department’s handling of evidence related to mass arrests more than a decade ago in downtown Washington.

After Referendums, Where There's Smoke There's Business

By Katelyn Polantz |

After two Western states and the District of Columbia voted Tuesday to allow wider legal use of marijuana, law firms are again sizing up potential business related to the drug.

Karl Racine.

Venable’s Karl Racine Wins D.C. Attorney General Election

By Zoe Tillman |

Venable partner Karl Racine will be the District of Columbia’s first elected attorney general, taking over an office that will be dramatically reshaped by the time he takes office.

2014 U.S. Supreme Court Clerks at Jones Day. From left to right are Andrew Pinson, Atlanta (Justice Thomas); Michael Murray, Washington (Justice Kennedy); Julia Fong Sheketoff, Washington (Justice Breyer); Sparkle Sooknanan, Washington (Justice Sotomayor); Aaron Tang, Washington (Justice Sotomayor); Ryan Walsh, Washington (Justice Scalia). Not pictured: Caroline Edsall, Washington (clerked October Term 2012 for Chief Justice Roberts).

Seven More Supreme Court Clerks Join Jones Day

By Tony Mauro |

Jones Day announced Wednesday it has hired seven former U.S. Supreme Court law clerks as associates in recent weeks. And if the news sounds familiar, that’s because Jones Day hired six former clerks last year and six the year before, for a total of 19 Supreme Court clerk hires in three years.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: A Republican landslide; GM's bankruptcy shield; the Supreme Court hears whistleblower case.

Lawyers answer voters’ questions from Pennsylvania and Florida in the Election Protection call center at DLA Piper Tuesday morning.

Answering the Call: D.C. Lawyers Work Election Hotline

By Katelyn Polantz |

Inside the Election Protection call center, where lawyers talk to voters from Pennsylvania and Florida on behalf of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. The voters have called the hotline for help—how to vote, where to vote, what to take, or if they’ve encountered an issue—and often don’t realize they’re conferring with some of D.C.’s greatest legal brainpower.

James Duff.

James Duff to Lead Judiciary's Administrative Office

By Marcia Coyle |

James Duff, president and CEO of the Freedom Forum and CEO of the Newseum and Newseum Institute, will take on a repeat engagement as head of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, effective Jan. 5.

Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty's Moment in the Spotlight

By Andrew Ramonas |

Leading business and technology groups have called on Congress to boost funding for U.S. Department of Justice work on certain international law enforcement requests.

(l-r) David Sentelle, Stephen Williams, and Janice Rogers Brown.

D.C. Circuit Skeptical of Challenge to NSA Surveillance

By Zoe Tillman |

In weighing a constitutional challenge to the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, a panel of federal appeals judges in Washington expressed doubts about whether the challengers had standing to be in court—let alone whether they could prove that the surveillance program violated the Fourth Amendment.

Election Day: The NLJ Guide to Campaigns, Ballots, Litigation

By Katelyn Polantz |

Voter ID laws, ballot referendums and law firms participating in the political process—this midterm Election Day brings a plethora of activity affecting the legal community. Brush up on the issues to watch tonight when polls close, and take a look back at the NLJ's best election stories.

Eric Holder Jr.

DOJ, Civil Rights Lawyers Set Out to Monitor Polls

By Zoe Tillman |

As the midterm elections kick off on Tuesday, U.S. Department of Justice lawyers and civil rights groups are heading to the polls to keep tabs on state and federal voting law compliance.

Protest against NSA surveillance (File photo Oct. 2013)

The Morning Wrap

By Mike Scarcella |

The D.C. Circuit today will hear a challenge to the NSA's bulk collection of phone records. The clocks were haywire Monday at the Supreme Court. And a decision nears on the president's pick to replace Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. Here's a news roundup from ALM publications and other media outlets.

James Walsh.

Ex-Lawmakers Predict Post-Election Return of Earmarks

By Katelyn Polantz |

Former Republican Congressman James Walsh, now at K&L Gates, has predicted that federal earmarks could return to Congress next year. The change could revive the lobbying industry and spark a now-stagnant Congress by giving it more discretionary power after the mid-term elections Tuesday, he said during a webinar sponsored by his firm.

Futures Industry Group GC Steps Down After 20 Years

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Futures Industry Association, the main advocacy group in Washington for futures commission merchants, is losing its general counsel, Barbara Wierzynski, who has served as the organization's top lawyer for 20 years.

Ethics Complaint Against Dickstein Shapiro Alleges Illegal Lobbying

By Katelyn Polantz |

Partners at Dickstein Shapiro didn’t register to lobby Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi despite meeting with, calling and emailing her and her staff, according to an ethics complaint filed in the state on Friday.

Hyundai, Kia to Pay $100M Over Clean Air Claims

By Zoe Tillman |

Hyundai and Kia have agreed to pay a record $100 million in civil penalties to resolve allegations they violated the federal Clean Air Act by misstating the fuel efficiency of their vehicles.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: a new target for the nation's most prominent plaintiffs firms, a growing army of lobbyists interested in a controversial tax-lowering tactic, the new executive director of the National Basketball Players Association and Democrats' scramble for votes before Election Day.

Maryanne Wells.

Could Law School Be Any Scarier?

By Katelyn Polantz |

Originally a joke among friends at Baylor, the Undead Bar Association is Wells’ series of mystery novels, all focused on the complicated legal questions in which zombies, ghosts, vampires and other spirits may become entangled.

Patrick Murck.

Bitcoin Lawyer Exchanges GC for Executive Director Title

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Bitcoin Foundation, the leading advocacy group in Washington for the controversial digital currency, has tapped general counsel Patrick Murck to serve as its next leader.

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. speaks about alternatives to incarceration programs in the Eastern District's ceremonial courtroom.

Holder Endorses Eastern District Alternatives to Prison

By Andrew Keshner |

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. said Thursday that alternative-to-incarceration programs taking root in the Eastern District of New York are "emblematic" of the sort of specialized programs that the nation needs in order to address overincarceration within the federal criminal justice system.

Redskins Argue to Keep Trademark Case in Virginia Court

By Zoe Tillman |

A Virginia federal judge seemed inclined Friday to allow the Washington Redskins to continue to fight in the trial court over the validity of the team's trademarks.

Va. Lawyer Gets Six Years for Theft From Clients, Family

By Nate Beck |

A former Virginia bankruptcy attorney was sentenced Friday to six years in prison for stealing more than $1.1 million from his clients and family, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday.

Black Aggie statue in the courtyard behind the Dolley Madison House on Lafayette Square.

Why Some People See Ghosts at the Federal Circuit

By Jenna Greene |

It’s hard to think of anything less supernaturally spooky than patent infringement or takings claims, but the two federal courts charged with hearing such cases are among the most haunted places in Washington—at least according to popular legend.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: censored documents concerning issues at Guantanamo Bay, no charges yet in Virginia embezzlement case and Whirlpool beats a moldy washer class action.

Rosemary Collyer.

D.C., California Next Battlegrounds Over Online Streaming

By Zoe Tillman |

Online television streaming service Aereo suffered a defeat last week in a New York federal court, but competitor FilmOn X is pressing on with similar fights against copyright lawsuits in Washington and California.

Google campus.

D.C. Judge Punts YouTube Video Suit to California

By Andrew Ramonas |

A federal trial judge in Washington hit the stop button on a suit over the removal of the YouTube video "LuvYa LuvYa LuvYa," sending the case against Google to a California judge to decide.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Cable pay-out, quarantine clash and a question over Patton Boggs’ billing practice: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Apple Headquarters at 1 Infinate Loop.

Apple Refreshes Its Line of iLobbyists

By Andrew Ramonas |

Apple Inc. has upgraded its roster of outside lobbyists in Washington for the first time in two years with the addition of three Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr lawyers.

Patton Boggs, Washington, D.C.

Patton Boggs Hid Client Payments from Court, Trustee Says

By Katelyn Polantz |

A bank in bankruptcy proceedings paid Patton Boggs nearly $575,000 that the firm never disclosed, a trustee said in a court filing Tuesday that asks for repayment. Patton Boggs was required to tell the court what it had charged and earned from the bank in the year before the bankruptcy.