Legal Times

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Sri Srinivasan.

Appeals Court Says It Can’t Fix Judge’s Sentencing Mistake

By Zoe Tillman |

Prosecutors and defense lawyers agree that a federal judge in Washington made a mistake when he sentenced Derrek Arrington to two back-to-back terms of supervised release. (They could only run concurrently.) But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Friday said it was powerless to fix the error.

Risa Lieberwitz.

University Professors Assoc. GC at the Head of the Class

By Andrew Ramonas |

The American Association of University Professors has tapped Cornell University law professor Risa Lieberwitz as its general counsel, the Washington-based trade group announced this week.

Stephen Leckar.

Drug Case Sentencing Dispute Pitched to Supreme Court

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court may decide next month whether to wade into a long-simmering debate: In deciding the length of a criminal sentence, can federal judges take into consideration conduct for which the defendant was acquitted?

Another Firm Iced: Arnold & Porter, Zuckerman Add Support to ALS Charity Campaign

By Katelyn Polantz |

Arnold & Porter and Zuckerman Spaeder were among a number of legal groups in Washington and elsewhere to take part in the ALS awareness-raising charity campaign that has gone viral on social-networking sites this month.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on race in America, a jury consultant quiz and another federal judge strikes down a same-sex marriage ban.

Frank Schwelb.

D.C. Court of Appeals Judge Frank Schwelb Dies

By Zoe Tillman |

District of Columbia Court of Appeals Judge Frank Schwelb, who served as a judge in the city’s local courts since 1979, died on Aug. 13.

US. Department of Labor headquarters at the Frances Perkins Building in Washington, DC.

6.1M Workers Could Benefit from Raised Overtime Threshold

By Andrew Ramonas |

Employers could end up paying 6.1 million more workers overtime if the U.S. Department of Labor moves ahead with a proposal to change salary regulations to adjust for inflation, according to an analysis [LINK: ] issued by a left-leaning think tank on Wednesday.

Alex Kozinski, left, and John Bates, right.

Chief Judge Kozinski Weighs in on Surveillance Reform

By Tony Mauro |

The federal judiciary, which usually presents a united front to Congress and the public, is showing some cracks over the issue of reforming the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Amy Berman Jackson.

Judge Orders DOJ to Disclose 'Fast and Furious' Records

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington has ordered the U.S. Department of Justice to release certain records about its response to a congressional investigation into a controversial gun sting operation, and to justify its decision to withhold others.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

A court case involving the late model Anna Nicole Smith, the U.S. Supreme Court weighs in on same-sex marriage in Virginia and a managing partner at Squire Patton Boggs discusses the mergers: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Attorney General Eric Holder shakes hands with Bradley J. Rayford, 22 following his meeting at St. Louis Community College Florissant Valley in Ferguson, Mo., Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014.

In Ferguson, Eric Holder Reflects on Personal History

By Todd Ruger |

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. met with community groups and law enforcement Wednesday in Ferguson, Mo., urging cooperation to reduce tension after days of clashes between police and protesters.

Demonstrations outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Justices Block Virginia Same-Sex Marriages

By Tony Mauro |

As expected, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday delayed enforcement of a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Virginia's ban on same-sex marriages.

Demonstrations outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Justices Block Virginia Same-Sex Marriages

By Tony Mauro |

As expected, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday delayed enforcement of a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Virginia's ban on same-sex marriages.

WMATA Settles Whistleblower's Fraud Claims for $4.2M

By Jimmy Hoover |

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has agreed to pay $4.2 million to the feds for allegedly giving out uncompetitive software contracts that used federal funding, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Rick Perry's legal team; Eric Holder promises robust action in Ferguson; Squire Patton Boggs loses Middle East group.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr.

Eric Holder Pledges 'Robust Action' in Ferguson

By Todd Ruger |

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. on Tuesday took his message directly to the residents of Ferguson, Mo., pledging in an op-ed "robust action" to bridge gaps between law enforcement officials and their communities.

Texas Governor Rick Perry

Two D.C. Lawyers Join Rick Perry Defense Team

By Angela Morris |

Gov. Rick Perry has assembled a legal team of state and national power players to fight his felony charges.

Fourth Circuit Divides Over Warrantless GPS Tracking

By Mike Scarcella |

City police in Baltimore acted in good faith in using a tracking device without a warrant, a divided federal appeals court said Tuesday in upholding a firearms conviction.

Jay Rockefeller IV.

Senator Launches Look at Airline Fees and Data Privacy

By Andrew Ramonas |

American Airlines Group Inc., United Continental Holdings Inc. and other U.S. air carriers are facing questions from Sen. Jay Rockefeller IV, D-W.Va., over concerns about how they reveal extra fees to their customers and protect their passengers' personal information.

William Moore.

Texas Businessman Seeks New Retaliation Trial Against Feds

By Zoe Tillman |

Texas businessman William Moore Jr. wants a new trial after a federal jury in Washington earlier this summer rejected his claims that he faced retaliation for speaking out against the U.S. Postal Service.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. heads to Ferguson, Washington considers challenge to gun ban ruling, and a chemical company pleaded guilty to violating the Clean Air Act.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

Bank Group Gives Thumbs-Down to CFPB Complaints Plan

By Andrew Ramonas |

A trade group that represents Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and other major financial services firms has ratcheted up the pressure on the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to reconsider an agency plan to post more detailed complaints about banks online, launching a public relations offensive against the proposal.

Larry Craig.

Larry Craig Defends Campaign-Funded Legal Expenses

By Zoe Tillman |

Lawyers for former U.S. Sen. Larry Craig filed court papers late last week defending his use of campaign money to pay legal bills related to his 2007 arrest in a Minnesota airport sex sting.

Outside US Supreme Court, June 2013, when the Court announced its decision on Prop. 8 and DOMA.  Proponents of same-sex marriage in Virginia on Monday asked the justices not to stay the Fourth Circuit ruling that struck down the state ban on gay marriage.

Va. Same-Sex Marriage Advocates Fight Stay Request

By Tony Mauro |

Groups supporting same-sex marriage are urging the U.S. Supreme Court not to delay enforcement of a federal appeals court ruling that struck down Virginia's ban on such marriages.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: The federal government is getting more involved in Ferguson, Mo., a Texas grand jury indicts Gov. Rick Perry, former Morgan, Lewis & Bockius partner Robert Manfred Jr. is named Major League Baseball's next commissioner and opponents to Comcast Corp.'s pending $45 billion purchase of Time Warner Cable Inc. and AT&T Inc.'s $49 billion deal for DirecTV LLC are lawyering up.

Grand Jury Indicts Gov. Rick Perry on Two Felonies

Breaking news: Texas Governor Rick Perry indicted on two counts. NLJ affiliate Texas Lawyers covers the story.

Venable attorneys and others participate in the Ice Bucket Challenge on the rooftop of the firm's D.C. offices.

Dunked and Cold, But For a Good Cause

By Katelyn Polantz |

Venable dedicated an afternoon "ice-bucket challenge" to partner Michael Gollin as they raised money for research for the disease ALS.

Sixth Circuit Revives Michigan Lifer’s Hope for Parole

By Jimmy Hoover |

A Michigan man serving a life sentence for a 1987 drug offense will get a chance at parole after an appeals court revived his claim that the state parole board violated the Eighth Amendment in choosing not to review his case.

Dick Durbin (D-IL).

Senators Putting Tax-Inversion Deterrence on the Agenda

By Andrew Ramonas |

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., is urging pharmaceutical giant Hospira Inc. not to move its headquarters abroad to lower its taxes through the so-called corporate-inversion process—a tactic that he and other members of Congress are trying to discourage in the U.S. business community.

Hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, where the Ebola virus samples are tested. June 2014.

Ebola Outbreak Halts Some Deportations to West Africa

By Jenna Greene |

As the Ebola outbreak rages in West Africa, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on Friday announced it would provide new options to forestall deportation for people from Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone.

Fiancée Can’t Sue Divorce Lawyer for Malpractice, Court Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

By the time a malpractice lawsuit against Washington attorney Nigel Scott reached the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, Scott didn’t fight allegations that he negligently handled a divorce case. Instead, he argued—successfully—that his client’s fiancée couldn’t sue him.

Washington Metro's Silver Line Tempts Virginia Lawyers

By Katelyn Polantz |

In the large law offices scattered across the Northern Virginia business corridor, a handful of attorneys have fashioned practices around the Washington Metro extension. Other Northern Virginia lawyers have started riding the Silver Line—though those taking mass transit are still light in number.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications are around the web: a more peaceful scene in Ferguson, Mo., immigrant children's expedited court cases and the Washington Redskins go to court over the team's name.

James Smith.

Chief Patent Judge Discusses Board's Growing Pains

By Jenna Greene |

Faced with an enormous caseload and a damning inspector general’s report, James Smith, the chief administrative patent judge of the new Patent Trial and Appeal Board, on Thursday said the court was focused on building a “more efficient and effective structure” and issuing “high-quality legal decisions.”

John Elwood.

KBR Fights Review of Document Privilege

By Andrew Ramonas |

Lawyers for Kellogg Brown & Root Services Inc. are fighting back against a petition for a full federal appeals court in Washington to hear a dispute over company documents that a three-judge panel decided are privileged.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

The ‘pregnant man’ divorce case, second quarter financials for law firms and overviews of online privacy laws and firm mergers: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

US. Department of Labor headquarters at the Frances Perkins Building in Washington, DC.

OSHA Wants More Workplace Injury Data, Less Retaliation

By Andrew Ramonas |

After facing pressure from labor unions, President Barack Obama's administration is considering enforcement tools to deter companies from discouraging workers from reporting work-related injury and illness information—data that the government is looking to collect and make public.

Lorraine Mullings Campos

Defense Agencies Swayed by Single Comment

By Jenna Greene |

For those who wonder whether it’s worth it to comment on proposed agency rules, lawyers from Reed Smith have proof that the answer is yes. Based on a single comment, the U.S. Department of Defense, the General Services Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration changed a final rule covering the allowability of legal costs, according to partner Lorraine Mullings Campos and associate Joelle Laszlo.

Alan Gura.

Lawyer Wants Fees in D.C. Gun Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Alan Gura, the attorney who won a court ruling last month striking down a District of Columbia law barring individuals from carrying handguns in public for self-defense, is seeking an award of more than $50,000 in legal fees.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications are around the web: Google's trail of Post-it notes; a compliance hiring boom; Facebook denied attorneys fees.

Rosemary Collyer.

No Attorney Fees for Challengers in Texas Voter ID Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Texas won't have to pay more than $300,000 in attorney fees to a group that challenged the states' voter identification law in court, a federal judge in Washington ruled on Monday.

Richard Cordray.

CFPB Fines Bait-and-Switch Mortgage Scheme $19M

By Jenna Greene |

Online mortgage lender Amerisave Corp. on Tuesday was ordered to pay $19.3 million by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for deceiving tens of thousands of borrowers with a bait-and-switch mortgage-lending scheme.

Merrick Garland.

D.C. Circuit Upholds Ex-Congressional Aide’s Conviction

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal appeals court in Washington on Tuesday upheld the conviction of Fraser Verrusio, a former congressional staffer convicted on corruption charges related to the Jack Abramoff scandal.

Erik Autor.

Obama Administration Relaxes Lobbyist Ban

By Andrew Ramonas |

Some lobbyists can serve once again on federal agency committees and boards after the Obama administration changed a White House rule that barred them from the panels, according to guidance released by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget on Tuesday.

An oil distillation tower is transported to a state-run oil refinery in Arak, Iran.

Man Found Guilty of Violating Iran Embargo

By Jimmy Hoover |

A Maryland man faces up to 140 years in prison after a federal jury found him guilty on Monday of seven counts of exporting industrial goods and services to the embargoed country of Iran.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: A new ABA president, law school reforms, and a federal judge jailed in domestic dispute.

A Pot Primer for Legal Practitioners

By Katelyn Polantz |

This week we wrote about how large law firms are eyeing businesses related to the marijuana industry, a legal market still in its infancy that could yield millions of dollars in transactional work if it continues to expand. A number of other publications have also written about the marijuana industry and its economic effects.

CFPB Gets Real About Bitcoin Risks

By Andrew Ramonas |

Consumers should be cautious when using bitcoin and alert the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to any problems with the virtual money, the agency said Monday after a government watchdog this summer urged the CFPB to engage more on the currency.

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr.,

Roberts Hails Magna Carta In Appearance Before ABA

By Tony Mauro |

Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. made a rare appearance on Monday before the American Bar Association’s House of Delegates, hailing the importance of the Magna Carta as a foundation of “our fundamental freedoms” on the eve of its 800th birthday next year.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Lawyers are eyeing business as marijuana laws loosen, a judge sides with college football and basketball players in a case on broadcast and videogame licensing and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office doesn't tell the whole story about telework abuses.

N.J.'s Lowenstein Now in D.C., Grabs Lawyers from Dickstein

By Katelyn Polantz |

Lowenstein Sandler, New Jersey’s most profitable law firm, has opened a branch in Washington, an expansion made possible by moving three existing partners and hiring four insurance lawyers from Dickstein Shapiro.

James Brady, left, and President Bill Clinton in 1993

Gun-Control Advocate James Brady’s Death Ruled a Homicide

By Zoe Tillman |

The death of former White House Press Secretary James Brady Jr. has been ruled a homicide. The ruling opens the door to potentially new criminal charges against John Hinckley Jr., accused in the 1981 shooting that was deemed the cause of Brady’s death.

U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.

Senators Call for PTO Changes, Better Patent Quality

By Andrew Ramonas |

As legislation to fight abusive patent litigation languishes in Congress, a handful of Senate Democrats have called on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to turn up the heat on patent trolls by reducing "low-quality, vague patents" and improving the patent examination process.

Ron Wyden.

Senators Oppose Tax Change for Law Firms

By Todd Ruger |

A bipartisan group of 46 senators signed a letter this week to oppose a proposed tax reform provision that could harm large law firms and lawyers.

Demonstrations for and against same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

Virginia Asks Supreme Court to Take Same-Sex Marriage Case

By Tony Mauro |

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring on Friday petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to review an appeals court decision that struck down the commonwealth’s ban on same-sex marriage, even though he supported the ruling.

U.S. District Chief Judge Richard Roberts, right, overturned Magistrate Judge John Facciola's refusal to grant a search warrant for a mac.com email address.

Judge Reverses Order Denying Feds Access to Email Account

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington on Friday ruled prosecutors should be allowed to search the entire contents of an email account, overruling a magistrate judge’s concerns that the request was too broad and violated privacy rights.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: an unauthorized practice mystery, closing remarks in the Oscar Pistorious trial and no class for plaintiffs who claim Apple double-charged.

Parties Back at Federal Circuit in Important Patent Case

By John Council |

Litigants have filed briefs in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit to reargue an important patent decision in a Texas case.

Barack Obama.

Equal Pay: Obama Wants Compensation Data From Contractors

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Department of Labor is moving toward ordering federal contractors and subcontractors to reveal statistics on employee compensation by race, sex and ethnicity as part of President Barack Obama's effort to encourage equal pay in the workplace.

Larry Craig.

Larry Craig To Detail Legal Expenses for Sex-Sting Defense

By Todd Ruger |

Former U.S. Sen. Larry Craig must file papers next week that detail why he thinks $216,000 in legal bills rooted in his 2007 arrest in an airport sex sting were an appropriate use of campaign funds.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country, from advice for law firm restructuring to another round of same-sex marriage arguments. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Walgreens Stays, But Can Washington Stop Tax Inversion?

By Andrew Ramonas |

The decision by Walgreen Co. to forgo a plan to lower its taxes by moving its headquarters out of the United States was met with praise in Washington as federal officials look to make the so-called corporate tax "inversion" process harder.

James Boasberg.

Judge Finds DOJ and FBI Secrecy Arguments 'Wanting'

By Zoe Tillman |

A former securities lawyer serving 23 years in jail for fraud won an early victory in his fight to obtain documents from the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI about his case.

Victoria Nourse.

Georgetown Law Prof Victoria Nourse Joins Biden's Legal Team

By Todd Ruger |

Victoria Nourse, once a senior adviser to Joe Biden on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has rejoined her old boss in the White House.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Sprint drops its bid for T-Mobile; the 50 best law firms for women; Maureen McDonnell v. The World.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Reports Cast Wary Eye on Latin American Litigation Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

Companies doing business in Latin America face an enhanced risk of lawsuit abuse in the region under proposed changes to the countries' court systems, according to reports from the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform released Tuesday.

Mick Jagger.

'Can't Always Get What You Want,' Court Tells Tea Party Group

By Jenna Greene |

In an opinion sprinkled with references to the Rolling Stones, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled that Tea Party organization Stop This Insanity Inc. "will get no satisfaction" in its bid to use an all-but-obsolete campaign-finance provision to bypass disclosure requirements.

Cozen O'Connor Sues Ex-Clients for $500K in Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Cozen O'Connor claims two former clients failed to pay more than $500,000 in legal fees and costs for the firm's work on patent matters over nearly two years.

National Labor Relations Board.

NLRB Ratifies Actions Affected by Noel Canning Ruling

By Tony Mauro |

The National Labor Relations Board has ratified all of its administrative, personnel and procurement decisions from the 18-month period that were cast in doubt by the U.S. Supreme Court’s Noel Canning decision in June.

Don Young.

DOJ Owes $70K in Fees for Withholding Corruption-Probe Docs

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice must pay more than $70,000 in attorney fees to a government watchdog group after refusing to disclose documents about a congressional corruption probe, a federal judge in Washington ruled on Monday.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s general counsel departs the company, LinkedIn settles wage lawsuit, and a new federal judge in Vermont sworn in.

James Armstrong

Edwards Wildman Moves From West End to Downtown D.C.

By Katelyn Polantz |

Edwards Wildman Palmer has moved its 20-lawyer Washington office from Washington's West End to downtown, the firm announced Monday. The move comes at a time when a number of Washington law offices are preparing to swap spaces.

National parks and museums close their doors during the federal government shutdown in October 2013.

Feds Violated Labor Law During Shutdown, Judge Says

By Zoe Tillman |

The federal government violated labor laws by requiring certain employees to work without pay during last year’s government shutdown, even though they were paid later on, a federal judge has ruled.

Mobile Shopping Apps Face FTC Scrutiny

By Andrew Ramonas |

Companies behind mobile shopping apps have work to do to ensure consumers don’t face problems with payment accuracy or data security when they use the software, according to a Federal Trade Commission study released Friday.

James Brady, left, and President Bill Clinton in 1993

Gun-Control Advocate James Brady Dies at 73

By Zoe Tillman |

Former White House Press Secretary James Brady Jr., who became an influential voice on Capitol Hill on gun-control issues after he was shot during the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, has died at age 73.

Gregory Craig, seen here in 2008, served as honorary chair of this year's Legal Aid Society for the District of Columbia's fundraising campaign.

Legal Aid Breaks Fundraising Record in Annual Campaign

By Zoe Tillman |

The Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia raised more than $1.2 million in an annual law firm fundraising campaign, breaking previous records and crossing the $1 million mark for the first time.

Dentons office in Washington, D.C.

Dentons Sues Republic of Guinea for $10M in Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Dentons is suing the Republic of Guinea for more than $10 million in allegedly unpaid legal bills, plus interest.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: new doubts about the conviction behind a 2004 execution, the 40th anniversary of Nixon's resignation and a billion-dollar judgment against Russia.

Jill Pryor

Senate Moves on Longest-Pending Judicial Nominee

By Todd Ruger |

The Senate moved forward Thursday on the nomination to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit of Jill Pryor, who was first picked for the spot more than two years ago.

U.S. Capitol.

Lawyers Get Key Roles in New Majority Whip's Office

By Todd Ruger |

New House Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., announced that four lawyers will fill key positions in his office, including a former chief legislative counsel for outgoing Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

Nomination Group Recommends Three for D.C. Judgeship

By Zoe Tillman |

Two private attorneys—Philip Andonian of Bredhoff & Kaiser and Morrison & Foerster partner Robert Salerno—and federal prosecutor Darlene Soltys were recommended this week to the White House as potential nominees to an open spot on the District of Columbia Superior Court.

D.C. Circuit Rejects Gitmo Access-to-Counsel Challenge

By Zoe Tillman |

Requiring detainees held at the U.S. military installation at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to undergo genital searches before meeting with their lawyers is a “reasonable” security precaution, a federal appeals court in Washington ruled on Friday.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: Eric Cantor is quitting early, an anti-gay law is struck down in Uganda and the latest in the soap opera that is the federal corruption trial against former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell.

Amit Mehta.

Zuckerman Spaeder Partner Nominated to D.C. Federal Bench

By Zoe Tillman |

Amit Mehta, a Washington-based partner at Zuckerman Spaeder, is President Barack Obama’s latest nominee for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

SEC Pays Whistleblower $400K

By Jenna Greene |

A whistleblower who first tried to report wrongdoing internally got a $400,000 award from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the agency announced on Thursday.

Broker Who Exploited Dying Patients Settles SEC Charges

By Jenna Greene |

A broker charged with scouring nursing homes and hospices for terminally ill patients so wealthy clients could reap death benefits from annuities contracts agreed to pay $850,000, admit limited wrongdoing and be barred from the securities industry, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday.

Richard Leon.

Prosecutors Can’t Treat D.C. Defendants Differently, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Federal prosecutors can’t bring a charge against criminal defendants in Washington that they couldn't bring against defendants in the rest of the United States, a federal judge in Washington has ruled.

Airlines Say TSA Fee Hike Will Make Ticket Prices Soar

By Andrew Ramonas |

Advocates for American Airlines Group Inc., United Air Lines Inc. and other air carriers are contesting a U.S. Transportation Security Administration directive that they say inappropriately increases security fees for travelers.

Michelle Lee

Patent Official Calls for Clarity on Fee-Shifting

By Todd Ruger |

A top official at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office told lawmakers that companies need more clarity on how legal fees are awarded in abusive patent litigation disputes, even after two U.S. Supreme Court rulings on the issue this year.

Katie Couric, left, interviews Ruth Bader Ginsburg, right.

Ginsburg Says Colleagues Have "Blind Spot" on Women's Issues

By Tony Mauro |

In an interview with Katie Couric released Thursday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg defended her position in the landmark Hobby Lobby case, and said her male colleagues have a "blind spot" when it comes to women’s issues.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

The U.S. House voted to sue the president and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sat for an interview. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Barack Obama, left, and John Boehner, right.

House Republicans Move Closer to Suit Against Obama

By Todd Ruger |

House Republicans moved a step closer Wednesday evening to filing a lawsuit against President Barack Obama over what they say amounts to a breach of constitutional duties to follow the law.

David Ogden answers questions during his confirmation hearing for the position of Deputy Attorney General. February 5, 2009.

David Ogden Presses Changes to False Claims Act

By Todd Ruger |

A former top U.S. Department of Justice official under Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. on Wednesday pressed his call for changes to the False Claims Act, telling lawmakers that one of the law's provisions is "completely irrational."

William Lee, a partner at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr

Apple Jabs at Samsung's Academic Allies in Smartphone Appeal

By Scott Graham |

When Samsung Electronics Co. appealed the $930 million in damages awarded to Apple Inc. in the "trial of the century" over smartphone design, it had help from 27 law professor amici curiae who argued that the law of design patent damages "makes no sense in the modern world."

Illustration supporting the USA Freedom Act

Senate Updates Bill to Restrain NSA Surveillance

By Andrew Ramonas |

Leading technology and civil liberties organizations are putting their support behind an updated Senate bill to curb the National Security Agency's wide-ranging surveillance and make its activities more transparent.

Metro Center.

Class Action Challenges Metro Background Check Policy

By Zoe Tillman |

A civil rights class action filed on Wednesday accuses the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority of having a criminal background check policy that is “unduly harsh” and discriminatory.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: NLRB holds McDonalds jointly liable for franchisee violations; the McDonnell trial gets personal; a retroactive application of juvenile life sentence bans.

Victor Bolden.

Court Nominee's Article on Dead Justices Draws Concern

By Todd Ruger |

Victor Bolden just graduated from law school in 1990 when he published an article that uses imaginary and colorful dialogue between a deity and dead justices to explore how judges should decide race discrimination cases.

Jurors Log Off After Being Sworn In, Court Survey Shows

By Zoe Tillman |

All those warnings judges give jurors about not tweeting, posting on Facebook or otherwise sharing information about a trial online seem to be working. A new study shows jurors are mostly behaving when it comes to social media.

Mark Cady.

Iowa Chief Justice Reflects on Politicization of Judicial Elections

By Tony Mauro |

Judges must do a better job of educating the public about their roles in a democracy to counteract the politicization of state judicial elections, Iowa’s chief justice said on Monday.