Legal Times

Blog of Legal Times

U.S. Capitol building.

Texas GCs Lobby in DC for Lone Star State Courts

By Andrew Ramonas |

General counsel for Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc., iHeartMedia Inc., Frito-Lay North America Inc. and other Texas-based companies are looking to a well-connected lobbyist to help ensure the needs of the state's federal courts are met in Washington.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

High Court Fixes Mistake in Ginsburg Voter ID Dissent

By Tony Mauro |

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dissent in a Texas voter ID case last week contained an error that has now been deleted, the U.S. Supreme Court said Wednesday.

In this Sept. 25, 2007 file photo, an Iraqi traffic policeman inspects a car destroyed by a Blackwater security detail in al-Nisoor Square in Baghdad, Iraq.

Blackwater Guards Vow to Appeal Convictions for Iraq Shooting

By Zoe Tillman |

Former Blackwater security guards convicted Wednesday of killing unarmed Iraqi civilians will challenge the verdict, according to defense lawyers. The case, they said, isn't over.

Secret Service Faulted For 'Serious Lapse in Judgment'

By Jenna Greene |

Faulting the U.S. Secret Service for "a serious lapse in judgment," the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's inspector general in a memo released Wednesday said there was "no legal or procedural justification" for deploying of a team of agents to monitor a fellow employee’s neighborhood dispute.

Paul Smith.

Jenner's Paul Smith Joins Chelsea Manning’s Legal Team

By Zoe Tillman |

Paul Smith, a longtime appellate advocate at Jenner & Block, has joined the legal team representing Chelsea Manning in her fight for medical treatment in prison.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: An army of lawyers for election day; patent trolls; an SEC settlement

Chris Christie.

At Chamber Legal Summit, Christie Talks Up Tort Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was in Washington on Tuesday railing against what he said is a "cottage industry" of class actions targeting businesses, calling on President Barack Obama to help enact tort reform.

Larry Klayman, left, and Cindy Cohn, right.

Who's Arguing in the DC Circuit Over NSA Surveillance?

By Mike Scarcella |

Veteran appellate lawyer H. Thomas Byron III will defend the government’s bulk collection of phone records next month in a Washington federal appeals court, according to court papers filed Monday. Byron goes up against Larry Klayman, the challenger and lead plaintiff.

Brazilian Steakhouse Beats Feds in Fight Over Chef's Visas

By Zoe Tillman |

Victory is sweet—or, more appropriately, savory—for Brazilian steakhouse chain Fogo de Chao, which prevailed on Tuesday in a visa dispute with federal immigration officials.

The Morning Wrap

By Mike Scarcella |

A roundup of legal news from ALM publications and outlets around the country, including: the suspension of a Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice; Facebook's suit against law firms; and the high court's intent to review warrantless searches of hotel records.

Brian Brooks.

Former O'Melveny MP Named Fannie Mae's New GC

By Nate Beck |

Fannie Mae announced Monday that a former bank executive and managing partner at a Washington law firm will join its leadership.

CityCenterDC.

Brokers Report Real Estate Traffic Jam for D.C. Firms

By Katelyn Polantz |

Washington’s ocean of law firm square footage has decreased in size in recent years, but the city has one of the tightest office building markets in the country, according to a new study to be published Tuesday.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden exits an Ebola treatment unit.

Squire Patton Boggs Hired to Lobby on Ebola Drug

By Katelyn Polantz |

Squire Patton Boggs has inked a pharmaceutical lobbying client that’s pushing to develop a drug to treat Ebola, the company announced Monday.

Rick Kaplan, left, and Jane Mago, right.

Broadcast Group Names Insider for Fall Legal Lineup

By Andrew Ramonas |

The National Association of Broadcasters has tapped Rick Kaplan, a senior executive at the Washington, D.C.-based organization, to anchor its legal department, after NAB general counsel Jane Mago announced her retirement last week.

Ahmed Abu Khatallah.

Benghazi Suspect's Defense to Get More Resources

By Zoe Tillman |

The suspect charged in the deadly 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate complex in Benghazi, Libya, pleaded not guilty on Monday to new charges, including some that could carry the death penalty. As prosecutors decide whether to seek the death penalty, the court is set to appoint at least one new lawyer for the defendant.

Pro Bono Week: The Ultimate Roundup of Giving and Representing

By Katelyn Polantz |

In recognition of Pro Bono Week, National Law Journal lists recent coverage of legal aid projects and Big Law pro bono.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A roundup of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: Lawyers advise clients on Ebola, President Barack Obama chooses veteran Washington lawyer Ronald Klain as his Ebola point man, the U.S. Supreme Court issues a rare Saturday morning order and General Motors Co. general counsel Michael Millikin announces his resignation.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Divided Supreme Court Allows Texas Voter ID to Take Effect

By Tony Mauro |

A rare Saturday morning order from the U.S. Supreme Court allowing a strict voter ID law to take effect in Texas “risks denying the right to vote to hun­dreds of thousands of eligible voters,” three justices warned in dissent.

Demonstrations for and against same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation.  March 26, 2013.

High Court Declines to Block Gay Marriage in Alaska

By Marcia Coyle |

The state of Alaska on Friday moved onto the list of states with same-sex marriages when the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block a federal district court decision striking down the state's marriage bans.

Former Fannie Mae Exec Denied Access to Confidential Docs

By Nate Beck |

A federal claims judge has barred a former Fannie Mae executive from viewing a trove of confidential documents in a shareholder lawsuit against the government.

Attorney Mark Kuller, at his soon-to-be operating restaurant Proof, in May of 2007.

Mark Kuller, Tax Lawyer Turned Restaurateur, Dies at 61

By Tony Mauro |

Mark Kuller, a D.C. tax attorney who left his practice behind to open restaurants, died Thursday of pancreatic cancer at age 61. Kuller opened Proof, an acclaimed wine-centric restaurant, in Penn Quarter in 2007, and since then opened several others, including Estadio and Doi Moi.

Michelle Lee.

Tech Sector Sees 'Strong Leadership' in PTO Director Pick

By Andrew Ramonas |

President Barack Obama has secured the support of the technology industry with his nomination for director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, former Google Inc. lawyer Michelle Lee.

Cathy Lanier.

Judge Reaffirms Order Striking D.C. Ban on Carrying Guns in Public

By Zoe Tillman |

A judge on Friday denied the District of Columbia’s request to reconsider his ruling striking the city’s ban on carrying firearms in public.

Ronald Klain.

Longtime Washington Lawyer Ron Klain to be Named Ebola Czar

By Andrew Ramonas |

Veteran Washington lawyer Ronald Klain will be named as the Obama administration’s point man on the response to the Ebola outbreak, according to the White House.

How Labor and Employment Practices, Squeezed, Have Survived

By Katelyn Polantz |

Robert Smith’s retirement this month from Morgan Lewis, with one of the first and largest labor and employment groups in Washington, puts into perspective how a practice, squeezed by the commoditization of Big Law services, can still manage to survive.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A roundup of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: a possible Ebola "czar," disability lawsuits on the rise and a former Google lawyer is nominated to lead the U.S. patent office.

Detainees are shown to their new living quarters in a medium security facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

DOJ, Media Groups Fight Over Release of Guantánamo Videos

By Zoe Tillman |

A Washington judge Thursday temporarily put on hold her order requiring the public disclosure of 32 videos that depict cell extractions and forced feeding at the Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, detention facility.

Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010.

Two Covington Lawyers on BP Matters Leave for Kirkland

By Nate Beck |

Two Covington lawyers who have long defended energy companies and drugmakers have left the Washington firm for Kirkland.

James B. Comey.

FBI Director Assails Tech Cos. Over Data Encryption

By Andrew Ramonas |

FBI director James Comey Jr. on Thursday pressed Apple Inc. and Google Inc. to rethink the default encryption they offer on mobile devices, saying that the security feature could lead the United States to a "very, very dark place."

James Cole.

James Cole, DOJ's No. 2, to Resign

By Zoe Tillman |

Deputy Attorney General James Cole, second-in-command at the U.S. Department of Justice since 2010, is stepping down.

Paul Clement.

Clement Marks Milestone of 75 Supreme Court Arguments

By Tony Mauro |

Surrounded by friends, rivals, judges, family and even some clients, former solicitor general Paul Clement celebrated an enviable milestone Wednesday night: his 75th oral argument before the U.S. Supreme Court. “I learned from Ted Olson that you have to celebrate life’s events,” Clement said.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Bob McDonnell trial aftermath, disability access lawsuits and a new leader in the DOJ’s civil rights division: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

The U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in the aftermath of the August 7, 1998, al-Qaida suicide bombing.

D.C. Judge Awards $622M to Victims of 1998 Embassy Bombings

By Nate Beck and Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington on Wednesday awarded $622 million to victims of the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, resolving the last remaining claims in the D.C. court against the governments of Iran and Sudan for their role in the attack.

Vanita Gupta.

First South Asian-American to Lead DOJ Civil Rights Division

By Katelyn Polantz |

Former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer Vanita Gupta will temporarily lead the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, the department said today. Gupta will serve as acting assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division and principal deputy assistant attorney general.

Edith Jones.

Why It Took Months to Reveal Fifth Circuit Misconduct Dismissal

By Zoe Tillman |

In August, a panel of federal judges in Washington dismissed a misconduct complaint against Judge Edith Jones of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. The decision was announced on Wednesday—not by the court, but by the group that filed the complaint.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: a key IP case before the Supreme Court; AG pick timeline; a banner year for failed mergers.

U.S. Supreme Court (Oct. 5, 2014)

Justices Block Texas Abortion Law

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court late Tuesday halted enforcement of several parts of a federal appeals court ruling that shuttered abortion clinics throughout Texas. Three justices voted in dissent.

Andrew Ceresney, left, and William McLucas, right.

SEC Enforcement Leaders Debate Broken-Windows Policy

By Jenna Greene |

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Enforcement Division head Andrew Ceresney on Tuesday defended the agency’s “broken windows” policy of cracking down on minor violations during a panel discussion with five former directors of the division, who argued the agency is being too harsh.

Banks Want Exemption from Robocall Rules

By Andrew Ramonas |

The American Bankers Association has called on the Federal Communications Commission to eliminate telemarketing restrictions that pose "unreasonable and excessive litigation risks" to banks, as they try to send automated notifications to their customers about data breaches and fraud.

Inside the Michael Jackson Memorabilia Forfeiture Case

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice reached a settlement in a civil forfeiture case against a senior official in Equatorial Guinea accused of corruption. The federal government will sell the official's Malibu home and Ferrari, but he'll get to keep his private plane and most of his Michael Jackson memorabilia.

Eric Holder, Jr.

Feds Roll Out New Right-to-Counsel Policy

By Mike Scarcella |

Federal criminal defendants who plead guilty will no longer be asked to give up future claims that their lawyer was ineffective, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday in a policy shift.

Justices Thomas, Ginsburg, and Scalia joined in dissent Tuesday over the court's denial to review a sentencing dispute from the D.C. Circuit.

Scalia, Thomas and Ginsburg Align in Sentencing Dispute

By Tony Mauro |

An unusual lineup of three U.S. Supreme Court justices on Tuesday scolded the majority for declining to resolve a long-running dispute over judicial discretion in sentencing.

Justice Dept. Phone Data Memo to Remain Secret

By Mike Scarcella |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to step into a dispute over public access to a secret U.S. Department of Justice memo about the government’s ability to acquire phone data without a court order.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: terrorists are talking, NFL defeats ex-players' publicity rights suits and the Supreme Court of Canada considers physician-assisted death.

John Roberts, Jr., 2000.

Roberts Considered Representing Clinton in Jones Supreme Court Case

By Tony Mauro |

John Roberts Jr., then in private practice, did not rule out representing President Bill Clinton before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1997 in the legal battle surrounding Paula Jones’ allegations of sexual harassment. Roberts’ cameo role was not known until the latest release of papers from Clinton’s presidency.

Ford SYNC.

Ford, GM Argue They Don’t Owe Any Music Royalties

By Andrew Ramonas |

Ford Motor Co., General Motors Co. and two electronics companies are refuting claims that they owe recording artists and record labels royalties, arguing in federal court that certain audio devices in vehicles don't violate U.S. copyright law.

James Clyburn.

Two U.S. Reps. Defeat Subpoenas in Shirley Sherrod Defamation Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Reps. Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., and James Clyburn, D-S.C., won’t have to testify in Shirley Sherrod’s defamation case against the late conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart, a federal district judge in Washington ruled on Saturday.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the U.S. Supreme Court's opening week, more documents from President Bill Clinton's administration, asset seizures by police agencies and J.C. Penney Co.'s new leader.

Anthony Kennedy.

Kennedy Lifts Hold on Idaho Same-Sex Marriages

By Mike Scarcella |

Justice Anthony Kennedy on Friday vacated his order that temporarily blocked same-sex marriages in Idaho.

Elena Kagan.

Clinton Docs: Kagan Memos, Marc Rich Pardon and John Roberts

By Zoe Tillman and Jenna Greene |

The latest trove of newly released documents from President Bill Clinton’s administration cover a range of topics that include the pardon of Marc Rich and Elena Kagan's service as a White House lawyer during the Paula Jones scandal.

Barack Obama.

Obama Comes Out Again for Patent Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

President Barack Obama on Thursday said he is committed to patent litigation reform, as legislation to rein in patent trolls languishes in the Senate.

Another 5-5 Split for 7th Circuit in Wisconsin Voter ID Case

By Zoe Tillman |

The full U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit voted on Friday not to rehear a challenge to Wisconsin’s voter ID law, meaning the case may move more quickly up to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Stuart Delery.

Nursing Home Chain Pays $38M in False Claims Act Suit

By Jenna Greene |

One of the nation’s largest nursing home chains agreed to pay $38 million to settle federal and state charges that it wrongly billed Medicare and Medicaid for “effectively worthless” services and failed to provide proper care for some residents.

Theodore Newman, left, and Michael Farrell, right.

Three D.C. Appeals Judges Up for Reappointment

By Zoe Tillman |

Three senior judges serving in the District of Columbia’s highest local court—Michael Farrell, Theodore Newman Jr. and William Pryor—are seeking reappointment.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded, new plans to close Guantanamo Bay detention facility and a call for action on D.C. court nominees.

Wells Fargo Settles Claims it Denied Mortgages to New Moms

By Jenna Greene |

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage on Thursday agreed to pay $5 million to settle charges by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that it discriminated against home-loan applicants who were pregnant or on maternity leave.

Timothy Hester.

Covington Chairman Defeats Antitrust Trial Subpoena

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Boston on Thursday agreed to block a subpoena that would have forced Covington & Burling chairman Timothy Hester to be on call for an unspecified number of days to testify via video in an antitrust trial.

Obama Administration's ‘myRA’ Program Sued For Trademark Infringement

By Zoe Tillman |

In his State of the Union address in January, President Barack Obama announced a new government-backed retirement savings program called “myRA.” This week, a private retirement account services company sued the U.S. Department of Treasury, claiming the program’s name infringes on its trademarks.

Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

'Upskirt' Photos Case Dropped in D.C.

By Zoe Tillman |

Prosecutors in the District of Columbia have abandoned their criminal case against a man accused of taking photos of women, including their exposed private areas, at the Lincoln Memorial. The judge had suppressed evidence of the photos, finding the women didn't have a reasonable expectation of privacy.

Burger King Serves Up Deluxe Lobbying Team, To Go

By Andrew Ramonas |

Burger King Worldwide Inc. has ordered up two former congressmen with a value menu of 13 other lobbyists from Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld in Washington, as the U.S. fast-food giant faces backlash from federal lawmakers who see its planned merger with a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain as a tax-lowering ploy.

Rick Renzi.

Ex-Rep. Rick Renzi Loses Fight Over Public Corruption Conviction

By Zoe Tillman |

Former Arizona congressman Richard Renzi’s conviction on public corruption and racketeering charges will stand, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled on Thursday.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Supreme Court steps in on same-sex marriage and North Carolina voting, soft drink buyers may get hard case and AmLaw Daily sniffs out which firms are soaring and which are sinking.This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Bill Clinton.

Thousands of Pages of Clinton Docs Set for Release Friday

By Tony Mauro |

The next batch of previously restricted papers from the Bill Clinton White House, set to be released to the public on Friday, will include documents of potential interest about Elena Kagan, Richard Arnold, Lani Guinier, Vince Foster, affirmative action and presidential signing statements.

Eric Schmidt.

Tech GCs Call NSA Surveillance Reform a Matter of Trust

By Andrew Ramonas |

Google Inc. executive chairman Eric Schmidt and the top lawyers from Microsoft Corp., Facebook Inc. and Dropbox Inc. on Wednesday implored Congress to pass National Security Agency surveillance reform legislation, arguing that the U.S. technology industry faces grave threats to its business at home and abroad without action by federal lawmakers.

D.C. Lawyers Line Up to Fight Subpoenas in Antitrust Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Two weeks after Covington & Burling chairman Timothy Hester filed court papers opposing a subpoena for live video testimony in an antitrust trial, two more lawyers in Washington have joined the fight.

Jeffrey McFadden.

Philadelphia Firm Nabs Steptoe Securities Leader

By Katelyn Polantz |

Jeffrey McFadden, former head of Steptoe LLP’s securities litigation and enforcement practice, has jumped to Philadelphia’s Stradley Ronon, a regional firm half of Steptoe’s size.

Anthony Kennedy.

Idaho Gay Marriages on Hold, But Nevada Stay Is Lifted

By Marcia Coyle |

Justice Anthony Kennedy on Wednesday temporarily blocked same-sex marriages from going forward in Idaho following an appellate court decision striking down the state's ban.

Walter DeKalb Kelley Jr.

Hausfeld Hires Former Virginia Federal Trial Judge

By Katelyn Polantz |

A former Eastern District of Virginia federal judge who traded criminal cases for corporate private practice has moved to the plaintiffs litigation firm Hausfeld. Walter DeKalb Kelley Jr. joins the firm as a partner.

Reggie Walton.

Russian Company's Suit Against Former DLA Partner Survives

By Nate Beck |

A Russian railway company’s lawsuit, claiming that allegedly stolen money ended up in the hands of a Washington partner at DLA Piper, can proceed, a Washington federal trial judge says.

Roderic Boggs.

Washington Lawyers' Committee Ups Litigation Staff

By Katelyn Polantz |

The Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs, one of the metro area’s most prominent pro bono organizations, is reshaping its internal structure to focus more on litigation, executive director Roderic Boggs said Tuesday.

Microsoft Seeks Clearer Federal Data Rules

By Andrew Ramonas |

Mary Snapp, a deputy general counsel for Microsoft Corp., on Tuesday pushed for clearer federal data laws as her company fights a U.S. search warrant for user information overseas.

Jason Doss.

Investors Bar Blasts FINRA Arbitration as Biased

By Jenna Greene |

Old men. That’s who decide most investor disputes in the United States, according to a study by the Public Investors Arbitration Bar Association, which found that 80 percent of arbitrators associated with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Inc. are men, with an average age of 69.

Eric Washington.

New Rules For Law Students' Legal Work in D.C.

By Zoe Tillman |

The first major overhaul in decades to rules dictating how and when law students can practice in the District of Columbia was approved last week by the D.C. Court of Appeals.

The Morning Wrap

By Mike Scarcella |

Roundup of legal news from ALM publications and other media outlets, including: Waiting for the next moves on same-sex marriage; Tony West explains his move to PepsiCo.; Guantanamo force-feeding on trial; and big banks brace for another round of charges.

Pamela Jones Harbour.

Herbalife Hires a Safe 'Harbour' to Head Compliance

By Andrew Ramonas |

Herbalife Ltd. has brought on former Federal Trade Commission commissioner Pamela Jones Harbour to oversee the nutritional supplement provider's compliance work amid an investigation by the agency into the company's business practices and structure.

(l-r) David Sentelle, Stephen Williams, and Janice Rogers Brown.

Meet the D.C. Circuit Judges Who Will Decide NSA Case

By Zoe Tillman |

When the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit convenes Nov. 4 to consider the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of phone data, lawyers will make their case to one judge steeped in surveillance issues in recent years.

Behind the Scenes: SCOTUS Media Room on Opening Day

By Marcia Coyle |

There hasn't been an opening day at the U.S. Supreme Court quite as chaotic in the high court's pressroom as Monday's start of the October 2014 term.

Demonstrations for and against same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation. March 26, 2013.

Justices Decide to Stay Out of Same-Sex Marriage Cases

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to resolve the nation's constitutional debate over whether states may ban same-sex marriages.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: the U.S. Supreme Court's relatively low-key docket, the justices' church outing, fewer legal jobs and Hewlett-Packard Co.'s planned split.

Monsignor Peter Vaghi, Rev. Paul Loverde, bishop of Arlington, Va., Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., and his wife, Jane, left to right, leave Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington on Sunday after the annual Red Mass.

Six Justices Attend Annual Red Mass in D.C.

By Tony Mauro |

Six U.S. Supreme Court justices attended the Roman Catholic Red Mass in Washington on Sunday, an annual ritual that heralds the new judicial season that begins on the first Monday in October. Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. and justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan were in the front pews.

How a Health Care Lawyer Preps Clients Amid Ebola Scare

By Katelyn Polantz |

Health care industry lawyers have a role to play as the threat of the Ebola virus bears down on the United States, with one confirmed case in Dallas and a possible case in Washington as of Friday afternoon.

Therese Pritchard.

Bryan Cave's First Female Chair Plans DC Growth, Innovation

By Katelyn Polantz |

D.C.-based Therese Pritchard became the first female chair of Missouri-founded Bryan Cave Wednesday and spoke with The National Law Journal about her strategy.

Detainees are shown to their new living quarters in a medium security facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Guantánamo Force-Feeding Videos Will Be Unsealed

By Zoe Tillman |

Over the objection of the U.S. Department of Justice, a federal trial judge in Washington on Friday ordered the unsealing of 28 videos depicting the cell-extraction and force-feeding of a Guantánamo detainee.

Supreme Court's Website Makeover Debuts Monday

By Tony Mauro |

The U.S. Supreme Court's 14-year-old website is undergoing a makeover that will launch on Monday, when the justices return to the bench from their summer recess.

Superior Court of the District of Columbia.

Retired D.C. Judges Settle Suit Over Pay

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Treasury has agreed to readjust the retirement salaries of District of Columbia Superior Court senior judges who sued over their pay, the judges’ lawyer said on Thursday.

Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. speaking at the 50th anniversary celebration for the Neighborhood Legal Services Program at Howard University.

Holder Celebrates D.C. Legal Services Group’s 50th Anniversary

By Zoe Tillman |

Marking the 50th anniversary of Washington’s Neighborhood Legal Services Program, Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. on Thursday reaffirmed the U.S. Department of Justice’s push to expand legal representation for low-income individuals.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: a cyberattack on JPMorgan, legal concerns facing the Texas hospital treating a patient for Ebola and a judge rejects the feds' bid for secrecy in a Guantanamo Bay case.

Rosemary Collyer.

For-Profit Colleges Win Ruling Over Incentive Payments

By Nate Beck |

The U.S. Department of Education can’t deny for-profit colleges federal funds because they offer postgraduation bonuses and reward employees for high enrollment, a federal judge ruled Thursday.

Gladys Kessler.

Judge Rejects DOJ Bid to Seal Guantánamo Hearing

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington denied a request by the U.S. Department of Justice to seal an upcoming hearing over force-feeding practices at the Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, detention facility. The request was “deeply troubling,” U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler wrote.

Merrick Garland.

Howard Law to Host D.C. Circuit

By Zoe Tillman |

Howard University School of Law will temporarily become the seat of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on Nov. 5, hosting the judges as they hear arguments in three cases.

Temporary, secondary barriers outside the White House separates passers-by from the main, permanent fencing due to a recent trespass situation.  October 2, 2014.

O'Melveny Veterans to Lead White House Intruder Investigation

By Jenna Greene |

Two former O’Melveny & Myers partners have been given the formidable task of coleading the investigation into the White House fence-jumping incident.

John Elwood.

High Court ‘Quality Control’ Might Explain Marriage Case Delay

By Tony Mauro |

A new U.S. Supreme Court "quality control" procedure for handling incoming petitions may help explain why the justices were silent on Thursday about the seven same-sex marriage petitions pending before them.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Suits pending over celebrity photo hacks and voting rights while two women take the helm at large firms. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Will Rogers, left, of New York, and Cris Elkins, right, of Maryland demonstrating outside the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of arguments in the case challenging California's Prop 8 legislation. March 26, 2013.

No Action—Yet—on Same-Sex Marriage Petitions

By Marcia Coyle |

Same-sex marriage advocates and opponents will have to wait a little while longer to see what the U.S. Supreme Court will do with petitions urging it to finally resolve the nation's constitutional debate.

Melissa Sherry.

Latham Hires Melissa Sherry From SG's Office

By Marcia Coyle |

The ranks of another top U.S. Supreme Court and appellate practice is growing by one, courtesy of the Office of the Solicitor General of the United States. Former Assistant to the Solicitor General Melissa Arbus Sherry is returning to her roots as a partner in Latham & Watkins.

Emmet Sullivan.

Constitutional Challenge to D.C. Tax Sales Can Proceed, Judge Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

A constitutional challenge over how the District of Columbia handles the sale of homes with delinquent tax bills has survived the city’s bid to dismiss the case.

T.S. Ellis III

Gilbert LLP to Get $1.9M in Dispute Over Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Gilbert LLP is entitled to $1.9 million in fees and costs for its work securing a $26 million jury award for a former client, a federal judge in Virginia ruled earlier this week, rejecting the firm’s claim for more than $6 million.

Rudolph Contreras.

Judge Denies Broad Access to FTC Consumer-Complaints Database

By Zoe Tillman |

Legal services providers in the Washington metropolitan area can’t get access to a wide swath of information from the Federal Trade Commission’s consumer-complaints database, U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras in Washington ruled on Tuesday.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and around the web: NetApp wins fees and costs; Eric Holder's awkward exit; the SEC stretches the boundaries of insider trading.

Judicial Reform Group Shutting Down After 101 Years

By Tony Mauro |

The American Judicature Society, a powerful advocate for judicial reform, ethics and research, is shutting its doors after 101 years in existence.