Legal Times

blog-of-legal-times

Businesses Boost Bill to Kill ACA Mandate

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Retail Industry Leaders Association, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and more than 160 other business organizations are looking to deal another blow to the Affordable Care Act after it faced both a major setback and a key affirmation Tuesday.

Stuart Delery.

Software Maker Symantec Faces False Claims Suit

By Jenna Greene |

The Justice Department will intervene in a False Claims Act suit against Symantec Corp., which allegedly over-charged the government for hundreds of millions of dollars worth of software and related products.

Supreme Court Gets ‘Incomplete’ Grade for Transparency

By Tony Mauro |

A coalition formed to urge the U.S. Supreme Court to increase transparency criticized the justices on Tuesday for not doing more to boost public access to court proceedings in the term just ended.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: A senator's Affordable Care Act lawsuit tossed, a murder conviction vacated and Obama's administration fights to keep secret records.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Coalition Blows the Whistle on Whistleblower Retaliation

By Andrew Ramonas |

Labaton Sucharow, the Government Accountability Project and more than 250 other whistleblower advocates are pushing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to improve its program that was created four years ago as part of Dodd-Frank’s efforts to help workers report corporate wrongdoing.

Alvaro Bedoya.

Hill Lawyer Runs New Georgetown Law Center on Privacy

By Todd Ruger |

Georgetown University Law Center has created a center focused on preserving privacy and civil rights in the face of advancing technology, and it has hired one of Capitol Hill's top lawyers to run it.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: The unremarkable rise of gay judges, reduced sentences for certain federal drug offenders, an arrest on Capitol Hill and a court battle between the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and Congress.

Claudia Wilken.

Judges Describe Pitfalls of Long Vacancies

By Todd Ruger |

Judicial vacancies in the nation's federal district courts means litigation costs increase, judges spend less time on cases and civil disputes are harder to settle, a new report from The Brennan Center for Justice found.

Brian Sutter, the staff director of the subcommittee on health of the House Ways and Means Committee.

Congress Fights Subpoenas From SEC in Trading Probe

By Mark Hamblett |

The Securities and Exchange Commission is urging a federal judge to enforce two administrative subpoenas for congressional committee records and the testimony of a staffer in an insider trading investigation.

Patti Saris.

Sentencing Guidelines Lowered for Certain Drug Offenders

By Jimmy Hoover |

The U.S. Sentencing Commission on Friday unanimously approved a measure to reduce sentences for certain federal drug offenders by an average of 25 months.

Stewart Baker.

Debating the Efficacy of NSA Surveillance Oversight

By Andrew Ramonas |

The question of whether the oversight of the federal government's surveillance activities is effective came to a head on Capitol Hill on Friday as former National Security Agency general counsel Stewart Baker and representatives of technology industry and civil liberties interests butted heads.

Sonia Sotomayor.

Clinton Docs Reveal Concerns About Court Nominees

By Marcia Coyle, Tony Mauro and Todd Ruger |

Clinton White House documents released on Friday predicted a "vicious attack" against the possible nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court.

R. Allen Stanford.

D.C. Circuit Rejects Payback for Stanford Fraud Victims

By Jenna Greene |

In an unsuccessful bid to win compensation for investors swindled by R. Allen Stanford in a massive Ponzi scheme, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission was rebuffed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which ruled Friday the investors are not eligible for protection as customers.

Sexual Assault Claims Against U.S. Armed Forces Fail in D.C. Circuit

By Marcia Coyle |

Senior officials in the military and the U.S. Department of Defense cannot be held liable for the alleged rapes, severe sexual harassment and retaliation suffered by 12 current and former sailors and Marines, a federal appellate panel ruled Friday.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: General Motors Co. general counsel Michael Millikin testifies before Congress, Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are clashing over attorney fees, Bingham McCutchen is looking to merge with another major U.S. law firm and Army private Chelsea Manning, who was sentenced last year for leaking national security secrets to WikiLeaks, will start gender treatments.

FedEx is charged in an indictment in California for its alleged role in the distribution of controlled substances.

FedEx Indicted In Alleged Drug-Distribution Conspiracy

By Amanda Bronstad |

FedEx Corp. was indicted on Thursday on charges of shipping illegal drugs to online pharmacies that ended up in the hands of dealers and addicts.

Apple, Samsung on the Same Side in New ITC Case

By Jenna Greene |

Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are usually fierce opponents in patent battles, but they're on the same side of the table as codefendants in a new complaint filed at the U.S. International Trade Commission by Luxembourg-based Enterprise Systems Technologies SARL.

James Sandman.

D.C. Expands Pro Bono Practice Rule to In-House Lawyers

By Zoe Tillman |

Legal services lawyers in the District of Columbia are hoping a recent change in the local practice rules will bump up pro bono involvement by corporate in-house lawyers.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Movement at Microsoft and 21st Century Fox, Haley Barbour’s political spending and Lady Gaga’s court documents: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Ronnie-White.

Denied the Bench Under Clinton, Ronnie White is Confirmed

By Marcia Coyle |

Ronnie White, the first African-American judge on the Missouri Supreme Court, beat the odds by winning confirmation to a federal district court seat that the Senate denied him 15 years ago.

D.C. Attorney General Candidates List Grows

By Zoe Tillman |

Five Washington lawyers so far have announced their candidacy for District of Columbia attorney general, including Perkins Coie partner Lorelie Masters and Venable partner Karl Racine.

Miami Lawyer to Pay $4M to Fraud Victims

By Jenna Greene |

A Florida-based lawyer will pay nearly $4 million to harmed investors in a prime bank investment scheme, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced.

Wallace

D.C. Bar Withdraws Controversial Request for Rules Change

By Zoe Tillman |

The D.C. Bar’s Board of Governors is no longer pursuing a rules change that would have given bar leaders more control over the disciplinary arm’s spending—a proposal opposed by disciplinary officials.

Toney Anaya.

Former New Mexico AG Settles Fraud Charges

By Jenna Greene |

The former governor and attorney general of New Mexico settled fraud charges brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission stemming from his role as head of a company that the agency said was secretly controlled by two ex-crooks.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: BoA profits take a $4 billion hit due to litigation; FCC deluged with net neutrality comments; is Hillary running?

Aereo television streaming.

After Aereo, Rethinking Copyright Online

By Andrew Ramonas |

The U.S. Copyright Office wants to know what the public thinks about the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling last month against Aereo Inc. as the agency studies the state of copyright law in the digital age, according to an announcement Tuesday in the Federal Register.

Building that used to house the National Bank of Washington on the corner of G & 14 streets, N.W.

D.C. Circuit: Legal Fight Over Armenian Genocide Museum 'Regrettable'

By Zoe Tillman |

A group of Armenian-American philanthropists have been fighting each other in court for years over stalled plans for an Armenian Genocide Museum and Memorial in Washington. Two decades after plans for the museum began, its future is still uncertain, but the legal wrangling is coming to a close.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: The U.S. Supreme Court has fun too, the White House calls marijuana a states' rights issue, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren bashes Wall Street.

Peter Zeidenberg.

Jack Abramoff Can Keep His Lawyer, Judge Says

By Zoe Tillman |

As convicted ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff fights with federal prosecutors over how his latest tax refund should be spent, he’ll get to keep his lawyer over the government’s objection.

Eric Holder Jr., left, and Brad Karp, right.

Holder Touts Consumer Relief Provision in $7B Citigroup Deal

By Todd Ruger |

The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday continued to squeeze the country’s biggest banks for their roles in the financial crisis, securing a $7 billion global settlement with Citigroup over misrepresentations about residential mortgage-backed securities.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

SEC Lawyer to be GC at Investment Company Institute

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Investment Company Institute, a leading fund-industry trade group in Washington, D.C., is picking up senior U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission lawyer David Blass as its general counsel.

Pastor Mike Metzger, right, in March leads a prayer at the start of the Greece Town Board meeting. The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in May in Town Greece v. Galloway that local legislative bodies could start meetings with religious invocations without violating the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

Atheist to Deliver Opening for Town in Public Prayer Dispute

By Tony Mauro |

After winning a U.S. Supreme Court battle to allow religious invocations at monthly board meetings, the town of Greece, N.Y., will open its session July 15 with a greeting by an atheist.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round up of news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Citigroup Inc. agrees to a $7 billion settlement, President Barack Obama's plan to hire more immigration judges and lawyers falls short, a lack of communication between federal and local authorities posed difficulties in the search for the Washington Navy Yard gunman last year and Frederick Nance, a Cleveland-based regional managing partner at Squire Patton Boggs and lawyer for basketball star LeBron James, talks about the athlete's return to the city.

Merrick Garland, left, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit administers the oath to Christopher Cooper, right, district judge for the District of Columbia.

D.C. Federal District Judge Casey Cooper Takes Oath

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Judge Christopher “Casey” Cooper was sworn in to the federal trial court in Washington on Friday, taking the oath before a courtroom filled with friends and family representing the upper echelons of government and private practice.

Cadillac Exec Put in GM Lobbying Driver's Seat

By Andrew Ramonas |

General Motors Co. executive Robert Ferguson on Thursday returned to his old job as the chief lobbyist for the embattled automaker as it tries to ease anger in Washington, D.C., over its ignition-switch defect and ongoing recall crisis.

William Hubbard.

ABA Presses Concern Over Tax Reform Proposal

By Todd Ruger |

The American Bar Association warned Congress that law firms and lawyers would face substantial hardship under the leading tax reform proposals on Capitol Hill—and could be forced to reduce their number of contingency and pro bono cases.

Oil in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Ex-Patton Partner Loses New Pillsbury Job Over Chevron

By Katelyn Polantz |

Patton Boggs’ fight with Chevron Corp. has cost one of the firm’s former attorneys his new job. Litigator Benjamin Chew resigned from the partnership at his new firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman in the past two weeks, barely four months after moving to the firm.

The Morning Wrap

By Zoe Tillman |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Germany wants U.S. spy expelled, Third Circuit okays forcible medication for sentencing and a California man gets 15 years in prison for economic espionage.

Aereo: OK Then, We're a Cable Company

By Lisa Shuchman |

Aereo Inc., the video-streaming service the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last month was violating copyright law by using dime-sized antennae to broadcast television content to subscribers, has spelled out a new plan for its survival, one that ironically uses an argument put forth by the Court.

Ted Cruz, left, and Harry Reid, right.

Senate Democrats Fight Contraceptives, Campaign Finance Rulings

By Todd Ruger |

Senate Democrats on Thursday moved to counteract recent U.S. Supreme Court actions on two fronts, advancing a campaign finance amendment to the Senate floor and announcing a floor vote next week on legislation to undo the contraceptive-mandate ruling.

Emmet Sullivan.

D.C. Federal Judge Examines IRS Email Controversy

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington wants answers from the Internal Revenue Service about a cache of missing emails that belong to former IRS official Lois Lerner and about other ways the government can find the information in those lost records.

US Critical Infrastructure Unprepared for Cyberattack

By Andrew Ramonas |

Utility, oil and gas, energy, and manufacturing businesses in the United States and other countries are still unprepared for cyberthreats, with hundreds of information technology executives at the organizations reporting at least one breach in the past year, according to a study released Thursday by a data security think tank and a technology company.

J.A.

Former Steptoe Chairman Returns to Firm

By Jenna Greene |

Leading energy lawyer J.A. "Lon" Bouknight Jr. has returned to Steptoe & Johnson LLP, a firm he once chaired, after serving as general counsel to energy giant Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. for nearly five years.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: OPM gets hacked; Jesse Ventura's defamation suit; Commerzbank AG nears settlement for sanctions violations.

L. Andrew Zausner.

Greenberg Traurig Snags Government Law Team From Dickstein

By Katelyn Polantz |

Shrinking Washington law firm Dickstein Shapiro has lost its government law and policy practice group to Greenberg Traurig.

Ski Makers Settle Collusion Charges

By Jenna Greene |

Two ski makers accused of illegally agreeing not to compete for one another’s ski endorsers or employees reached a final settlement with the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday.

TROL Act Targets Patent Demand Letters

By Andrew Ramonas |

Patent demand letter legislation that a House panel is set to consider Wednesday is getting the attention of technology industry groups that are hoping the bill can curb at least some patent troll activity.

National Security Operations Center floor.

Report: Two Muslim American Lawyers Target of NSA Surveillance

By Zoe Tillman |

A report released Wednesday identifies two Muslim American lawyers whose communications were targeted in U.S. surveillance efforts.

Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) and other lawmakers introduce the Protect Women’s Health from Corporate Interference Act on Capitol Hill  Wednesday.

Legislation Seeks to Undo 'Hobby Lobby' Ruling

By Todd Ruger |

Democratic lawmakers introduced legislation Wednesday to undo the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that struck down the contraceptive mandate in the federal health care law for some corporate owners who object on religious grounds.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: Obama wants 40 more immigration judges; U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara's winning streak ends; Apple loses a patent case in China.

Patrick McPherson of Duane Morris.

Duane Morris Names I.P. Litigator D.C. Managing Partner

By Katelyn Polantz |

The new leader of Duane Morris’ Washington branch has legal experience that matches the largest practice area in the office: intellectual property. Patrick McPherson, a 51-year-old litigator, joined Duane Morris in 2002 to establish its Washington intellectual property group.

Barack Obama, left, and John Boehner, right.

Boehner Faces Challenges in Any Suit Against Obama

By Jimmy Hoover |

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, pressed his threat to sue President Obama over his executive orders, saying that Obama has “consistently overstepped his authority under the Constitution.” Legal scholars question the viability of any suit.

Christopher “Casey” Cooper.

Judge in Benghazi Case Discloses Ties to Justice Dept.

By Zoe Tillman and Jimmy Hoover |

The presiding judge in the criminal case against a suspected ringleader of the attack on an American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, disclosed his wife’s former ties to the U.S. Department of Justice during a hearing on Tuesday.

Obama Requests More Immigration Judges

By Todd Ruger |

The U.S. Department of Justice would get $64 million and about 40 additional immigration judges under President Obama's new plan to address the increased number of immigrants illegally crossing the Southwest border.

John Devaney

Perkins Coie's New Managing Partner to Head Firm from D.C.

By MP McQueen |

In its continuing effort to raise its national profile, Perkins Coie has named John Devaney as its first firm leader outside of its Seattle headquarters. Devaney will be based out of Washington, D.C., when he takes the reins as managing partner on Jan. 1, 2015. Perkins Coie will keep its headquarters in the Pacific Northwest.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: Behind the scenes at the Squire Patton Boggs merger, a napping baseball fan sues, and rookie advocates win at the U.S. Supreme Court.

NSA headquarters.

More Surveillance Revelations, More Calls for Reform

By Andrew Ramonas |

Organizations representing the technology industry and focusing on civil liberties have found more ammunition for U.S. government surveillance reform in a new report that says the National Security Agency collects far more communications from normal Internet users than it does from legally targeted foreigners.

FCC Building.

FCC Names Merger Review Lawyers in Comcast and AT&T Deals

By Jenna Greene |

With two megamergers pending, the Federal Communications Commission on Monday announced the legal teams that will review the $45 billion combination of Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable and the $48 billion merger of AT&T Inc. and DirecTV Inc.

Michael Rankin.

Judge Asked to Recuse in Discrimination Case Against Booz Allen

By Zoe Tillman |

Lawyers for a woman suing Booz Allen Hamilton Inc. for gender discrimination have asked D.C. Superior Court Judge Michael Rankin to step down, citing his son’s ties to the company.

Cheryl Krause.

Senate Confirms Dechert Partner Cheryl Krause for Third Circuit

By Todd Ruger |

The Senate voted 93-0 to confirm Dechert partner Cheryl Krause for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: The National Security Agency collects far more communications from normal Internet users than it does from legally targeted foreigners, the legal industry adds 1,200 positions in June, a court fight quickly escalates over the future of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Electronic Privacy Information Center has filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission concerning the news-feed study Facebook Inc. conducted on emotions.

Andrew Tulumello.

Gibson Dunn Files Challenge to Corcoran Deal

By Zoe Tillman |

A court fight is quickly escalating over the future of the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Two weeks after the gallery’s trustees asked a judge to approve a plan that involved transferring control of the museum’s building, art and school, a group of faculty, students and others—represented by Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher—filed papers opposing the deal.

Morning Wrap

By Katelyn Polantz |

Thomas M. Cooley Law School’s troubles, Hobby Lobby responses and the biggest law firm merger of the year: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

NSA headquarters.

NSA Privacy Report by Fed Watchdog Seen as Too Weak

By Andrew Ramonas |

Leading technology and civil liberties groups are disappointed with a study [PDF] the U.S. government's privacy watchdog released in support of a major U.S. foreign surveillance program that collects vast amounts of Internet user data.

Stephen Immelt.

Hogan Lovells' New CEO Steve Immelt on Strategy, Identity

By Katelyn Polantz |

Litigator Steve Immelt assumed the management role at the top of Hogan Lovells yesterday. He took about a half-hour to talk with us about his vision for the sprawling full-service firm. We also spoke about changes that the industry faces and how he’ll fill the shoes of Warren Gorrell Jr., who led Hogan & Hartson through its merger with Lovells in 2010.

Heavy security presence outside the DC federal courthouse in Washington on Wednesday, July 2, 2014, as a suspect charged in the 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya appeared for a detention hearing.

Benghazi Suspect's Lawyer Complains About Limited Discovery

By Zoe Tillman |

A lawyer for Ahmed Abu Khatallah—the suspect charged in connection with a 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya—agreed Wednesday that her client should remain in government custody, but raised concerns about the lack of discovery provided so far by prosecutors.

W. Neil Eggleston.

Salaries at White House No Match for Big Firms

By Todd Ruger |

The White House list of staff salaries for 2014 reveals just how much income lawyers can sacrifice for the privilege of working with the president.

The Morning Wrap

By Jenna Greene |

A round up of legal news from ALM-affiliated publications and around the web: The U.S. Supreme Court adds eight cases to its docket; Burford Capital talks about its ill-fated investment in Patton Boggs' Chevron suit; did Hilary Clinton violate attorney-client privilege?

Holland & Knight Boosts Energy Practice

By Katelyn Polantz |

Holland & Knight has acquired a group of 11 energy lawyers in Washington and Austin, effectively splitting in two the Washington-based energy boutique Brickfield, Burchette, Ritts & Stone.

Aereo television streaming

Aereo Rallies Customers: 'Make Your Voices Heard'

By Andrew Ramonas |

Aereo Inc. is looking to Congress to keep its online television-streaming service running after the U.S. Supreme Court dealt it a crippling blow last week, telling its backers to "raise your hands and make your voices heard" by lawmakers.

Peter Zeidenberg.

DOJ, Former Prosecutor Clash Over 'Switching Sides'

By Zoe Tillman |

The U.S. Department of Justice this week escalated the war of words in a fight over whether former federal prosecutor Peter Zeidenberg should be allowed to represent convicted ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

John Roberts Jr.

Roberts Announces Supreme Court Staff Retirements

By Tony Mauro |

Just before adjourning for the summer, Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. on Monday announced several retirements—not from the U.S. Supreme Court itself, but from its workforce.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: Defamation lawsuit against law school dismissed, the genesis of a Justice Department case against a big bank, and the fallout of a case based on deceit.

U.S. Department of Justice Deputy Attorney General James Cole, at mic, and Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell. June 2, 2014.

In BNP Case, Prosecutors Warn Companies About Cooperation

By Todd Ruger |

Government officials want to use the case against the French bank BNP Paribas—which has agreed to plead guilty and pay nearly $9 billion for transactions with countries that are subject to U.S. sanctions—as an example to companies about what path not to take.

NLJ Publisher Ken Gary Steps Down

By Andrew Ramonas |

Kenneth Gary, the former publisher of The National Law Journal, has joined OmniVere LLC after leaving the newspaper last week, the e-discovery company said Monday.

Vice President Joe Biden on June 5 met with the board of directors of the Association of Pro Bono Counsel and senior management from board members’ law firms.

White House Touts Law Firm Pro Bono Work

By Zoe Tillman |

Vice President Joe Biden expressed his support for law firm pro bono programs during a meeting this month with representatives from more than a dozen firms.

Lori Windham.

Outside the Supreme Court, Chants of "Hobby Lobby Wins!"

By Todd Ruger |

Dozens of antiabortion protestors gathered outside the U.S. Capitol cheered news that the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the contraceptive mandate in the federal health care law for some companies.

Samuel Alito, left, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, right.

Alito vs. Ginsburg: Twelve Quotes From Hobby Lobby Ruling

By Zoe Tillman |

Highlights from Justice Samuel Alito Jr.'s ruling that the contraception mandate violated the religious rights of corporate owners and from Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissent.

The Morning Wrap

By Andrew Ramonas |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: The National Law Journal releases its annual Washington Litigation Departments of the Year report, a suspect in the September 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, pleaded not guilty Saturday, Paul Zukerberg campaigns for D.C. attorney general and Aereo Inc. has stopped its online-streaming service for the time being.

E. Barrett Prettyman Court House.

Suspect in Benghazi Attacks Pleads Not Guilty in D.C.

By Zoe Tillman |

A suspect in the September 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, pleaded not guilty Saturday in Washington federal district court, where he is charged with conspiracy to provide support and resources to terrorists.

John Roberts Jr.

Lawyers Nervously Await Supreme Court Term’s Final Day

By Marcia Coyle |

The Roberts Court wraps up its ninth term on June 30 and, as has become its tradition, the final day brings the most closely watched case of the entire term.

Doctor Joins D.C. Judicial Review Commission

By Zoe Tillman |

A Georgetown University School of Medicine professor and researcher is the newest member of the District of Columbia commission that investigates complaints against local judges and reviews judges for reappointment.

John Elwood.

Appeals Court: KBR Can Keep Docs Secret From Whistleblower

By Andrew Ramonas |

Kellogg Brown & Root Services Inc. doesn't have to disclose certain documents to a whistleblower, a federal appeals court ruled on Friday in a dispute that raised concern among companies about the confidentiality of communication with in-house lawyers.

D.C. Tour Guide Regs Unconstitutional, Appeals Court Rules

By Zoe Tillman |

Regulations requiring tour guides in the District of Columbia to pass a 100-question exam about the city are unconstitutional, a federal appeals court in Washington ruled on Friday.

The Morning Wrap

By Todd Ruger |

A round-up of news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country: a federal judge is "clearly peeved," how immigration reform failed in the House, and uncertainty at the National Labor Relations Board for months or years to come.

Howard Baker.

Ex-Sen. Howard Baker, Once Considered for Supreme Court, Dies

By Todd Ruger |

Former Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee, whose Washington career included stints as majority leader and White House chief of staff for Ronald Reagan, has died at age 88 from complications of a stroke, his law firm and Senate Republicans said Thursday.

Major Media Mergers Spur Antitrust Debate

By Andrew Ramonas |

Silicon Valley Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) said on Thursday she isn't worried about the effects of mergers on major companies, as the U.S. government reviews the proposed Comcast Corp.-Time Warner Cable Inc. and AT&T Inc.-DIRECTV Group combinations.

Mike Lee.

Senate Republicans Laud Recess Appointments Decision

By Todd Ruger |

Senate Republicans lauded the U.S. Supreme Court decision Thursday that invalidated President Barack Obama's recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board.

Morning Wrap: SCOTUS decisions and more

By Katelyn Polantz |

Supreme Court decisions on technology, presidential power and abortion clinic restrictions; Eric Holder’s career retrospective; and lawsuits in lower courts: This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Amazon Prime Air drone.

Lawyers, Hobbyists Bemoan New Drone Rules

By Jimmy Hoover |

Entrepreneurs like Jeff Bezos looking to incorporate drones into their business practices will have to wait a little longer, according to a proposed rule from the Federal Aviation Administration about safety procedures for the operators of unmanned aerial systems. The message was clear: hobbyists only.

Paul Williams, president of ASCAP

Music Industry Discord on How to Tune Up Copyrights

By Andrew Ramonas |

As the House tries to walk the line between competing copyright interests in the music industry, advocates for songwriters, record companies and radio providers on Wednesday pointed fingers at each other for problems they see in the song licensing system and the efforts to reform it, giving lawmakers little clarity on a path forward.

Patrick Leahy.

Voting Rights Bill Stalls on Capitol Hill

By Todd Ruger |

A year after the U.S. Supreme Court gutted a key antidiscrimination provision of the Voting Rights Act, a congressional push to undo the justices' ruling is stalled because of opposition from Republicans, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said Wednesday on Capitol Hill.

Supreme Court Rules Against Aereo in TV Streaming Case

By Zoe Tillman and Marcia Coyle |

Online streaming startup Aereo Inc. violated the copyrights of major television broadcast networks by retransmitting programs to users’ Internet devices for a fee, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday.

Justices Endorse Privacy in Cellphone Search Cases

By Mike Scarcella |

Law enforcement must generally obtain a warrant before searching the contents of a cellphone that belongs to a person under arrest, the U.S. Supreme Court said on Wednesday in a major ruling on digital privacy.

Morning Wrap: Squire Patton Boggs reshuffles, Aereo decided

By Katelyn Polantz |

Patton Boggs sees changes in its groups leaders, the Supreme Court decides the Aereo case, some U.S. oil may be shipped abroad and an American book chain splits in two for trading purposes. This is a round-up of legal news from ALM affiliated publications and news outlets around the country. For more legal news, visit law.com.

Ellen Segal Huvelle.

D.C. Federal Judge Recovering from Injury After Fall

By Zoe Tillman |

U.S. District Senior Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle will be away from the federal court in Washington for several months as she recovers from a spinal cord injury.

Brad Smith.

Microsoft G.C.: Surveillance Reform Needs to Rebuild Trust

By Andrew Ramonas |

Microsoft Corp. general counsel Brad Smith on Tuesday pressed the technology giant's case for National Security Agency surveillance reform in Washington, saying the U.S. government hasn't done enough to build trust in the year since the revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Rosemary Collyer.

Texas Fights Million-Dollar Legal Fee Award in Voting Case

By Zoe Tillman |

A federal judge in Washington reached a "remarkable result" when she ordered Texas to pay $1 million in legal fees to groups that challenged the state’s electoral redistricting plans—a result that Texas Solicitor General Jonathan Mitchell called "unprecedented" and wrong.

Larry Klayman.

D.C. Attorney Larry Klayman Agrees to Censure in Ethics Case

By Zoe Tillman |

Larry Klayman, the Washington attorney who won a landmark trial court ruling against government surveillance, has agreed to accept a public censure for violating attorney ethics rules.

Pamela Harris.

Fourth Circuit Nominee Pamela Harris Defends Statements on the Law

By Todd Ruger |

Federal circuit judge nominee Pamela Harris spent much of her confirmation hearing Tuesday on Capitol Hill explaining away past public statements, including legal analysis and political comments that raised opposition from Republican senators.